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To repeat what I said yesterday, this was supposed to be a visit to get photos of tugs and ships in ice.  The Cuyahoga may be quite cold, but no ice . . . .

This shot is taken from the Carter Road Bridge looking toward Collision Bend and the bug venues.

Under the Rte 2 Bridge, Alpena awaits her 76th season!  She makes me feel young!

In resplendent light last summer late, I caught her heading northbound mid-Lake Huron.

Again, I imagined ice;  two weeks earlier and I likely would have seen it.

The yellow of the water makes more vivid the yellow of her hull.

Some crew is maintaining boiler pressure.

And when the season begins, Alpena will back out of this dock on the old river, turn to port and head back to work for her 76th season.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who looks forward to seeing her steaming on the Lakes again this summer.

Previous Cleveland posts on tugster include this and this with laker Buffalo,  and this with–among other things–Iowa towing Sea Eagle II up the Cuyahoga.   There are others also if you just use the search window.

 

I’d planned a gallivant along the coast of Lake Erie to see ice, maybe even walk and fish on it, as I did many decades ago.  February would normally be a good time for that, but my actual schedule depended on someone else, my son.  Well . . . I was told that a week earlier, ice fishing was happening here . . .  Click on the map below to make it interactive.

Huron OH?  I admit never having heard of it.  It’s just east of Sandusky, which I saw here, and roughly between *7 and *8, posts on the Great Coast that I did last fall.

This two-part panorama (above and below) shows the turning basin near the mouth of the Huron River, which might be fun to canoe one of these years.

I use AIS to determine which roads I take on a gallivant like this, and this surely is not the green icon I saw, but I’m thrilled the icon led me here.  Adam E. Cornelius is not as old as it looks–launched 1973–and I’ve no idea what her fate will be.  And she’s Toledo’s pride.

 

One of these years, I hope to see her, under this name or another, back hauling Great Lakes minerals around our Great Coast.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  And that green icon that led me here, I’m guessing it was either R/V Kiyi or R/V Kaho.  anyone help?  Chain link stood in the way of my getting any reasonable picture.

For the many previous “port of” posts on tugster, click here and scroll.

 

Wendell Sea . . . she started out as Scott C, in 2007, meaning she worked as a SeaBoats vessel for only around a third of its life.  I got these photos of her last week.

She’s larger than I imagined:  104′ x 37′ and powered by 4800 hp. That’s Dean Reinauer in the background.

 

 

Back in April 2010, she looked like this.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Some of you likely know where this tug–  Normandy–worked before it arrived in the sixth boro.  I did not.  Nor did I know other unusual features of the boat . . . which some of you also know.

She’s attractive, smartly painted, and compact:  79′ x  27.’

But I didn’t know until now that she was triple screw, nor that before coming to NYC, she’d operated for Vale Coal Ltd. of  Barranquilla.

Other tugs in Colombia can be seen here, here, and here.

All photos by will Van Dorp.

On January 10 Emily Ann was moving crane barge eastbound in the Kills.

Columbia New York has lift capacity of 400 tons.

Any time I see Emily Ann, I think of a story shared here by a reader about her role in saving lives in the Florida Strait.

A reliable source tells me that even juvenile loons know this story, although they’ve not yet seen a crane like this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

What does a 70+ degree temperature day in February in the sixth boro look like?  Well . . . see for yourself.  Cornell light and likely back from a TOAR training, rafts up to Mary Whalen in Atlantic Basin.

Along the Brooklyn shore, there was Genesis Glory with GM11105.

Brooklyn–ex-Labrador Sea–light was headed for the Kills.

An anchored Crystal Cutler stood by with Patricia E. Poling.  Over in the distance is Malik al Ashtar, another 13,000+ teu container ship.  See Crystal light, high and dry here.

Over near the foot of Atlantic Avenue, Linda Lee Bouchard stands by alongside B. No. 205.

And finally, along the BQE and Brooklyn Heights, C. Angelo with EMA  1152, the EMA standing for Express Marine, the outfit that used to deliver fuel to the sixth boro’s coal-fired plants.  Express Marine tugs Consort and Escort used to be regulars in the port.  I believe they are currently “laid up.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Traffic on the East River captivates, in part, because of the context, the vertical density shrinks even large vessels, or flotillas like this.

Weeks 531, I’m thinking, must be fairly new, not only because I’ve seen her only in 2018, but more so because she doesn’t show up on the Weeks crane pages.  For a 500-ton lift capacity crane, she’s strangely absent online.

Unlike most crane barges that I’ve seen, she has a prominent superstructure.

When she was “west” bound the other day, Katherine was out front, tailed by

Susan and Michael (ex-Freddie K) Miller.

Back in January I caught the next two photos of Weeks 531 headed directly from the AK into Newark Bay.   At first view, I assumed Weeks had a huge new tug.

That’s Bergen Point between the equipment and my lens.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Can anyone fill in more info on the 531?

Previous posts featuring Weeks equipment can be found here with the Shuttle Enterprise and here with USAirways Flight 1549, in both cases involving Weeks 533, another 500-ton capacity crane.

Here’s a good view of the props on a z-drive boat.  The 8.5′ props are part of the Schottel SRP 1515 FP drive system.  Note the port-a-potty between the stacks, a dry-dock worker convenience?

The scale of the cranes at Howland Hook belies the fact that Jay Michael and Bosco, passing Shooters Island, are still at least a mile closer to the lens than HH port.

In different light, here’s a Bosco closeup.

James E. Brown before dawn;  the structure like a lighthouse beyond JEB‘s stern is the control tower at Newark Airport, which celebrates its 90th anniversary this coming October.

The Statue salutes Little C.  I’ve often tried for a photo that suggests the Statue’s eyes are fixed on something in the foreground, and I’d say here Little C has helped me make that happen.

Barge John Blanche is returned homeward through Hell Gate by Diane B.

OK . . .  Is it Joan or Doris?

I’ll stop here.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Definitely some sort of military truck, probably FMTV made by Oshkosh.  Some of the numbering is Hebrew.

And there’s a bunch of them, up there

squeezing under

the Bayonne Bridge, as they and the rest of the cargo

aboard the Norddeusche ship

rounds Bergen Point on the way to Port.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has seen military trucks and other vehicles atop the boxes previously here, here, here, and here.   Once I even spotted a cigarette boat way up there.

What?!@#!!  See the end of this post.

 

For the past few years now, NYC municipal trash has traveled by barge and train to landfills in several states.  Captain D here is pushing this barge with containerized trash from a transfer point in Queens to a rail loading facility in Staten Island. Click here for animated explanation of trash movement overseen by DSNY.

As I understand it, the green containers are covered by a Waste Management contract, whereas the black ones, the older slightly contract, by Covanta.

One constant in the harbor has long been the Staten Island ferry; the new “constant” is these trash containers.

 

 

As a resident of NYC now for almost two decades, I have to say that for all the population density and numbers, NYC’s five terrestrial boros are relatively “tidy.”

You just can’t do what we did in my youth . . . set up a burn barrel at the hedgerow end of the farthest field and stoke it once a week.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who got photos of the new DSNY container cranes moving to the SW Brooklyn transfer station here.

And the first photo was taken from the mouth of the Bronx River, where the trash barge lined up with the Arthur Ash Stadium with a LaGuardia runway in between. Captain D was coming out of Flushing Bay.

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