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Given the number of posts I’ve done on names, you’re right to assume they fascinate me.  Of course, the names are just placeholders, but much preferable these names to numbers.   This recent salt ship, for example, could be called Ever Lion . . . if Evergreen had chosen to use animals rather than qualities for their “L” class.  I suppose “ever lion” might be misunderstood for “ever lying,” not a great name for several reasons. Ocean Lion used to be called Ocean Lyra, in fact.

I was planning to do a whole series of these Evergreen ships, but I missed Ever Liberal, Ever Legend, and a few other ones that recently called in the sixth boro.

Leader surprised me . . . the hull was black . . . but maybe that was a primer coating.

Global Andes . . . an intriguing name.

Genco Warrior . .  another one of their ships is called Knight . . .

Grouse Arrow seems to assume the opposite perspective, not predator but prey or rather projectile to render a being prey.

Tugela is a river in South Africa. That fleet uses place names all starting with T.

Obsidian . . . well, a mineral name seems appropriate for a mineral carrier.

The best name I’ve seen this fall is El Babe.  I’d pronounce it as one syllable, even though it’s probably intended as two.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who accepts the fact that it’s okay to miss a lot of traffic.

But here’s one more from Alaska, New General, thanks to Bob Heselberg. She’s in Skagway Alaska, loading ore for Asia.  Taken Dec 02 2017.  Thanks, Bob.

 

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