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We came across this bridge inspection operation

between E-13 and E-12 eastbound on the Canal

in the town of Fonda, NY, not far from the speedway, which has hosted motor racing for 90 (!!) years,  and the fair, which is way older.

But the other day, Arnold D, of Seaway Marine Group, stood by and placed inspectors in the basket where they need to put eyes on the infrastructure.

 

For context on Fonda and lands immediately to the east, enjoy these shots.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, one of whose previous Seaway Marine posts involved stocking fish

here.

My sidekick and I caught glimpses of Helen Laraway over a period of about 30 hours starting in Coeymans.

At the first sighting, Helen seemed to be moving astern with a load of scrap, whose origin I wondered about.  SS Binghamton perhaps?   My sidekick?

Oh, I borrowed this beauty from Diana, who had been called away on a mission.

 

Whatever my sidekick was thinking, I’ll never know, as she spoke not a word

in spite of watching with intensity.

While we were on the crag, Helen passed southbound and we caught up a bit later.

 

 

Safe travels.  Notice the Left Coast Lifter near the left margin of the photo above?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts with Helen can be found here.

Here are previous posts in this series.

Floragracht hurries upstream just north of Montreal

with a mixed cargo

on its deck.  The sail might be re-named Wet Autumn Dream.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The cities of Sorel and Tracy surround the Richelieu River –flowing under those bridges–at the point it empties Lakes Champlain River into the Saint Lawrence.  I’ll admit from the start that I can hardly say I know this place, but here are some photos taken as we passed.

Sunny Young was taking on a grain cargo, I believe, and

 

Federal Caribou was tied up across the river’s mouth.

Laker Ojibway–a straight decker–I’m guessing was having its cargo discharged.

Sorel-Tracy is a steel and metallurgy center, although I can’t tell you much more than that.

 

Florence Spirit was at the dock slightly south of town.

What product is generally stored under these domes . . . can I get some group-sourced info?

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous in this series.

As we depart downstream on this rainy day, Ocean Pierre Julien  heads upstream.

Ocean Intrepide stands by Silver Manoora and Mars S.

 

Over alongside Sorel-Tracy, Ocean Jupiter heads upstream for reasons beyond my ken.

 

The twins wait in Quebec City, and

Ocean Serge Genois, farther upstream.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

What gives the location away . . . if you’ve never seen Albany, is the prolate spheroid along the right side of the photo.   Prolate spheroid?  Think football.  But actually that one is called the egg.  It’s a performing arts center, and I’ve never been inside. Albany is the new home of Marie J. Turecamo.

You’ll often see a Reinauer unit parked here, this time it was Haggerty Girls with RTC 107.

Two of these Liebherr Mobile Harbor Cranes serve to transfer heavy cargoes.

 

Although Albany is over 120 miles from the Atlantic, ocean-going vessels call here regularly.

Road salt was the

cargo delivered by Siirt.

Mary Kay stands by;  she previously appeared here as Mary Loy Turecamo.

Closing out this look at the port of Albany, a common barge cargo out of Albany is scrap metal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will post again after finding reliable wifi.

The previous post in this series shows the port in  the late 19th century, so I’d say it’s high time to update.  This lighthouse dates to 1934, and I’ve long wondered why the buildings have not received a much-needed re-painting.

Oceanis appears not to be a commercial vessel, at least not now, but the hull was surely inspired by something large and seaworthy.

 

Stephen B. Roman, however, carries her weight among all the hard working vessels on the Lakes.  Any guesses what the B. stands for?    Answer follows.

 

Essroc is one of two cement companies delivering to the port of Oswego.

And these ingots regularly delivered by Wilf Seymour and Alouette Spirit?  You may see them next as Ford F-series parts stamped out by Novelis Oswego.

x

The B. is for Boleslav.  Stephen Boleslav Roman was a mining engineer.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For starters, let me say I should have visited the Chittenango Landing Canal Museum a long time ago.  And if you’re in the Syracuse area, it’s certainly worth a visit.

Now the museum is much, much more inclusive than this diorama, but the subject matter intrigues me . . .   My all-time favorite circus movie was Something Wicked This Way Comes, stemming from Ray Bradbury’s ripe imagination.  But I’d love to see a movie doing a rendering of life in central New York set in Sig Sautelle’s floating circus…   so many strands . . . 200 years of canal history, Civil War drummer boy turned circus guy, meow man cats, ventriloquism and maybe a split personality, and to

juice it up, there needs to be a murder or a sordid affair.

Maybe it involves a rival circus, and it could all get

scented up by a wayward whale . . . westbound, crossing paths with the eastbound circus!

More canal spectacle here, although additional surprises may lie around each bend.

 

 

Crown Princess moves lots of people; the collection of all the newest ferries in the sixth boro move even more people, and although one might expect that the addition of this new fleet would be a win-win for the city and the builder.  I rode one of the ferries on the first day of operation and reported here.   Well, has it been a win-win?   . . .

maybe not so much.   Here’s one of the new ferries cruising the East River with background that 10 years ago was just not there.  Click here for more on NYC ferry

Seeing Great Republic in the Brooklyn Navy Yard serves to remind me that I’ve not taken Bridgeport  & Port Jefferson Ferry in more than 10 years, a fact to be remedied.

I’m not sure why WMEC-906 Seneca was there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who stumbled across some advance planning on the part of some companies like Cunard.  

 

Here’s what’s on the surface and

here’s a bigger picture.  That trio in the sky following Bruce A McAllister tails us as well!

Big Jake once

trafficked the sixth boro as Juliet Reinauer.

Over at the Brooklyn passenger terminal, Jonathan C waits,

canvas on the fenders, to assist Crown Princess out.

And given my scarceness in the sixth boro, the only image I have to date of the new Capt. Brian A. McAllister has the tug concealed by Alex and Eric.

And then out on the Sound, it’s John P Wronowski and escort,

headed for the barn.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recently stumbled onto an interesting blog, now added to my blogroll under a seamsters.org  Damn autocorrect . . . I really typed aa seasisters.org          the “aa” being there to keep this near the top of my links.

 

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