I’ll identify this one in a bit, but try guessing?  Here’s the helm and

the engine room.  It was re powered in 1952–3 and has proven its value in both fire and ice.

While you ponder that–if you so choose–check out these related vessels.  I’m not sure the one below has a name.

Curtis Randolph‘s namesake was a Detroit firefighter.  Click here for a site dedicated to Detroit fireboats.

Hogan is NEITHER a government boat nor a fireboat, but it berths near Randolph and does perform emergency duties in the Detroit River.

Ditto Mackinac Marine Rescue, although it can fight fire as well.

And this returns us to the two photos at the top of this post:  it’s the Elizabethport NJ built E. M. Cotter, built in 1900 in the area right across from Howland Hook.

She’s lovingly kept immaculate by her very proud crew with some funds raised independently. 

Click here for an article from a few days ago on needs of this, the world’s oldest working fireboat. At that link, there are also photos of Cotter‘s operations over the years.

As that article also says, it’s the fine Swedish steel that explains her longevity.

If you’re from Elizabeth NJ or anywhere in northern NJ,

it’s well that you know about this fine vessel and the shipyard where she was first launched,  where the first class of USN submarines were also built.   Also, John Purves, the museum-based tug in Sturgeon Bay, was also built in Elizabethport.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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