What’s that vessel in light battleship gray primer?

She’s been cleaned right down to the bilge . . .

Recognize this riveted hull?

There’s a William Francis Gibbs design surrounded by that 900-ton travel lift.

Here’s the new look bow,

profile,

and stern.

In new paint and old colors, it’s Fire Fighter.

Here’s a note from Mike Hibbard, Museum VP and Historian, “This work was made possible by grants from the National Parks Service National Maritime Heritage program, as well as the NY State Office of Historic Preservation, and our supporters and benefactors who provided matching donations to allow us to access the grant funds. We’re still taking donations for shipyard work thorough our donation page on our website, and presently have a benefactor willing to provide a 100% match on any donations up to $50K received for additional yard work.
When Fighter emerges from the shipyard, she’ll no longer be sporting the red coat of paint applied to the FDNY fleet in the 1960’s. We’re taking her back to her 1938 appearance – which means she’ll have a black hull, white topside house, black decks and a buff stack. All the monitors, bitts and nameboards will also be returned to their original polished brass appearance.”

Here is the post mentioned I’m updating.  I’m eager to see this resurrected vessel back in Greenport.  According to Museum President, Charlie Ritchie, ETA back in Greenport is before Memorial Day.

Enjoy some more process photos . . . hydroblasting the hull . . .

rivet head welding below the waterline, and

more of those great lines in light battleship gray.

Come see her in Greenport soon.

 

 

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