You are currently browsing the monthly archive for May 2017.

Enterprise seems a great title for a post on National Maritime Day, but here’s a question answered at the end of this post:  Why–other than the 1933 proclamation by Congress–is May 22 chosen for this day?  Answer at the end of this post.

Jake van Reenen took these photos yesterday in Clayton, NY.  The title evokes my Salvor post from eight plus years ago.

Atlantic Enterprise and crane barge are headed to the sixth boro, still many sea miles ahead.

Jarrett M assists with the tow, a role it played about a month upstream through the same waters here.

 

 

I’m eager to see this Salvor twin back in the sixth boro.

This post from nearly 10 years ago features my first view of this vessel–then called Barents Sea–under way.

Many thanks to Jake for these photos.  If all goes as planned, Enterprise will arrive here in less than two weeks.  Eyes peeled?

So, May 22 . . . it’s National Maritime Day because of Savannah, that’s SS Savannah, she who began the first Atlantic crossing on this date under steam power 199 years ago . . . well, at least steam powered her wheels for a little over 10% of the trip, but you need to start somewhere, eh?  And this fact is alluded to in the 1933 proclamation, as well as in the 2017 proclamation.

 

Click on the photo to get the source of the photo and the story of her short life.  And the 199 years ago, that just begs for some sort of memorializing in 2018…

Did Hurricane Sandy unearth SS Savannah wreckage?  Read here.

 

Here from Lock E-28A, Bob Stopper’s photo of Canal Corp’s efforts to get the Canal open for season 200!

The rest of these photos come from Jan van der Doe, starting with Sandra Mary, 1962,  in McNally colors and built by Russel-Hipwell at Owen Sound in 1962.

W. N. Twolan, also 1962 built, alongside Menier Consol.

At the end and off the stern of W. N. Twolan, it’s the last side-wheeler ferry to operate on the Great Lakes, PS Trillium, launched in 1910.  To see Trillium after a 1975 refit, click here.

In what I first thought was an unusual military dazzle pattern is actually a 1966 Davie Shipbuilding former cargo vessel that’s been reborn as a floating dry dock.  Click here for Menier Consol transporting pulpwood. 

Last but not least, it’s William Rest, 1961.  Toronto Dry Dock is one of so many places I need to visit.

Many thanks to Bob and Jan for these photos.

Here are previous posts with this title.  Another unusual cargo that passed through here were these barged US, British, and Russian jets five years ago also in May.

I owe all these shots to Mike Pelletier and other folks who were at E2 in Waterford yesterday, as the Erie Canal opened for its 200th consecutive season.  It’s cause for celebration that Day 1 brings significant commercial cargo into the Canal.

The job will entail moving a total of 12 identical tanks from the Hudson River level to the Rochester level. At the end of this post, I share a photo I took at the Rochester area a few years ago in the fall.  Can you imagine what that part of the Canal looks like?  But I digress.

If you don’t know the story, let me highlight some details, although you can read more here.  The cargo here consists of three tanks, each 20′ x 60′ and fabricated of stainless steel.  If each tank holds 2000 barrels, or 661,000 cans, and if I drink an average of two six-packs a month, one tank holds a 4,500 year supply of Genesee for me….  Another way to think of it . . . if a party was held and each guest had three beers, all twelve tanks would contain enough beer for 2,644,000 guests!  That would be enough beer @ two or three beers each for every 21+ person in Wyoming, Vermont, North Dakota, and Alaska . .  and quite a bit more left over.  But I’ve really digressed.

Here the tow lies alongside the wall below E2. #Toast the tanks is the tag Genesee wishes “social media makers” to use to group-document this journey.

Here CMT Otter pushes the tow into the opened lower gates of E2.  Here is a previous post featuring Otter and fleet mates.

So, here the tow is inside and the lower gates closed. The shot above was shot from midpoint on the catwalk over the gates beyond the stern of the tug.   The lock chamber valves are now set to fill. The two crew lower photo are radioing distances to the captain.

 

Now the camera is back to that same catwalk.  What else do you see?   I missed it the first times I looked at this photo….

See the drone?  It’s between the catwalk rail and the portside stern of CMT Otter.  I’m guessing this is CMT’s camera team.

Believe it or not, this is the Canal through which these tanks will travel near the end of their journey to Gates . . . Rochester, beyond E33.   From the Canal, Rochester is mostly invisible.

Now some speculation . . . I believe the tanks arrived in the US aboard Wladyslaw Orkan on a voyage that began in Shanghai around March 13.  My guess would be that the manufacturer is Lehui, possibly in Xiangshan Ningbo.  If all this is true, I’m curious about this stated goal on the Lehui site:  “During a two-decade-plus journey, Lehui exercises “European Quality, Chinese Price” philosophy, which won Lehui “the most outstanding beer/beverage equipment manufacturer” in China.”  Where were previous Genesee tanks fabricated?  With concerted several decades effort, a 21st century plan to return more manufacturing to the US might be held on course with a mantra something like ““European Quality, Chinese Price, US Essence, ”    . . . concerted effort . . .

Click here to see the tentative schedule.

Thanks again to Mike Pelletier.

 

What’s that vessel in light battleship gray primer?

She’s been cleaned right down to the bilge . . .

Recognize this riveted hull?

There’s a William Francis Gibbs design surrounded by that 900-ton travel lift.

Here’s the new look bow,

profile,

and stern.

In new paint and old colors, it’s Fire Fighter.

Here’s a note from Mike Hibbard, Museum VP and Historian, “This work was made possible by grants from the National Parks Service National Maritime Heritage program, as well as the NY State Office of Historic Preservation, and our supporters and benefactors who provided matching donations to allow us to access the grant funds. We’re still taking donations for shipyard work thorough our donation page on our website, and presently have a benefactor willing to provide a 100% match on any donations up to $50K received for additional yard work.
When Fighter emerges from the shipyard, she’ll no longer be sporting the red coat of paint applied to the FDNY fleet in the 1960’s. We’re taking her back to her 1938 appearance – which means she’ll have a black hull, white topside house, black decks and a buff stack. All the monitors, bitts and nameboards will also be returned to their original polished brass appearance.”

Here is the post mentioned I’m updating.  I’m eager to see this resurrected vessel back in Greenport.  According to Museum President, Charlie Ritchie, ETA back in Greenport is before Memorial Day.

Enjoy some more process photos . . . hydroblasting the hull . . .

rivet head welding below the waterline, and

more of those great lines in light battleship gray.

Come see her in Greenport soon.

 

 

The last leg for now goes from Newport to Warren RI, but given the favorable wind before the torrent, let’s watch those contemporaries who play in this N-Bay city with such a long colonial and post-colonial history.

I’m quite unschooled about these speedsters, like the one showing her red belly.  A 12-meter, I suppose?

Northbound past Beavertail Light?

 

Madeleine heads out to play.

This racer is sponsored by the Danish wind energy company, quite appropriately, as I would hardly expect an ExxonMobil sponsored wind boat, although petroleum energy companies have started investing heavily in renewables . . . so someday soon there might be an Exxon sail racer.   Here’s BP’s portfolio.

 

Aurora has been featured here almost two year ago.

Marilee (1926)  is a classic, as is Pam (1921), once a whiskey runner.

Just as the wind boats use moving air currents to speed, this red tail benefitted from it to hover over a snake, which he eventually dropped, caught, and hauled off behind the tree line . . .

This is not a great photo, but Wallace Foss (1897!!) can be yours for a mere $165,000.  Those winds eventually brought lots of rain, which we

saw as we did the last short step . . . Newport to Warren.

I’d love to have seen NOAA’s Gunter and Bigelow closer up . . .

Gracie M. Reinauer (2016) waited for more favorable offshore weather before heading to the sixth boro.

And finally, after over a 1000 miles on our itinerary, we return to home base, where Niagara Prince welcomes us back.  So does anyone have photos to share of Niagara Prince in the Champlain Canal, the western Erie, Chicago Sanitary Canal, or any other inland waterway where scale make her look immense?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  For a similar focus on sailing vessels associated with a specific water mass, click here for photos from the Great ! Chesapeake Schooner race.

And if you’ve not caught the connection of this journey to Albert Gallatin (a US founding father), click here.

This leg from New York harbor, aka the sixth boro,  to Narragansett Bay was not proposed in Gallatin’s report, but we have gotten here by means after much time and miles in his ditches. We depart a few hours after dark and head into the

East River under some puffy clouds.

The 1903 Williamsburg Bridge seemed especially iconic this night…

At Hell Gate, we passed Evening Light towing a fuel barge.

Then we headed under the spans between Queens and the Bronx.

I shot once, a look back before getting too far eastward.

At foggy daylight, we passed Patuxent with barge and

some draggers with nets filtering through the Sound.

Block Island dashes ahead of us between Point Judith and its namesake island.

Lights at Point Judith and

Castle Hill guide us in, as they do

other vessels.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Actually, only part of this leg is through the ICW, or another way to say this is that from Cape May to NYC you need to be in the ocean.  For a map that shows this, click here. This leg takes us from Baltimore to New York City, which in this case is not the end of the trip.  More on that later.

Below, Key’s Anthem is Baltimore’s new Inner Harbor water taxi, the first vessel of 10, one that’s all local vernacular . . . a Hooper’s Island drake tail.

Tiwai Point prepares to discharge a load of sugar, from Colombia, I think . . .

Bridget McAllister (and other McAllister boats) waits at the dock.

We head out past Natty Boh and Brooklyn . . . ,

Vane’s Carlyn,

and Justin with an unidentified load.

Was it Justin that towed Tamaroa out to the reef site last week?

At the Chesapeake side of the C & D Canal, it’s Dann Ocean’s home base, with (l to r) First Coast, Diamond Coast, New England Coast, Sea Coast, and Gold Coast.  By the way, Gallatin called this the Delaware & Chesapeake Canal and estimated it as 22 miles long with 18 locks.  The current Chesapeake & Delaware is 14 miles long and all water is at sea level, i.e., no locks.  Here’s the history.

Defender (I think) steams inbound for Pennsauken with Cape Cod tailing a Crowley barge.  Depending on which barge this was, capacity is 400–500 teus.

Gulf Venture/Carrier anchors off Salem . . .

And then morning brings a jagged island up out from the deeps and we

line up some towers . . . while Le Grand Bleu waits in Gravesend Bay.

Note the unusual wake and splash pattern on Jonathan C.‘s stern?

And an unfamiliar Kirby vessel– Mount St. Elias–moves DBL 77 upriver.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

As we head up the Bay to Baltimore, we pass many things, including Island Pilot,

Kismet from a port I once knew well,

 

Sea Crescent,

Capt. Henry Knott,

 

je ne sais quoi,

Indian Dawn and some others,

Miss T, 

and some surprises at the John W. Brown dock:  Z-One, April Moran, and James R. Moran.

And we’ll leave this post here with arrival in Baltimore.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the reference on Gallatin’s 1808 report proposing the ICW.

This post focuses on the in-port stay in Norfolk, starting with Thunder and

showing her in context with Storm and Squall.

Since we’re starting with small tugs, check out Beverlee B at work and

light.

Hoss is a sister of the sixth boro Patricia, here light and

here at work.

To close out, it’s Ann Jarrett,

Maxwell Paul Moran and Clayton W Moran, 

Emily Ann McAllister,

and a whole slew of boats I’ll get back to later, here leaving the East branch of the Elizabeth river.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, in Norfolk.

Leg 3 took us from Beaufort NC to the Elizabeth River, Norfolk.

Again, when I’m back, I’ll catch up on identifying in words what you can identify yourself.

 

Morehead City is a deepwater port.

 

 

After some rough weather spent in port, the shrimp fleet heads back to work . . . parade style.

Yup . . . I like it.

The long bridge at the top end of NC.

I can’t wait to play with night images I took as we approached Norfolk.  Just enough water vapor in the air traced the line of the spot light as we confirmed location buoy by buoy . . . 0300.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,134 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

May 2017
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031