Let’s look at these from a different perspective . . . whether they can escape the inland seas shared by the US and Canada or not.  The maximum size the Seaway aka Highway H2O can accommodate is 740′ x 78. x 30.’

So Kaye E. Barker . . . 767′ x 70′ x 36′ . . . Nope.    But when she first came off the ways in Toledo in 1951, her loa was 647′ and she had no self-unloader, so back then she could have,

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although there was no St. Lawrence Seaway then either.  So Nope again. But she was not lengthened until 1976, so Yes.  Her tonnage capacity is 25,900.

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Mississagi comes in at 620′ x 60′ x 35,’  so if she’s carrying a partial load . . . maybe.  She came out of the River Rouge in 1943.  Her capacity . . . 15,800 tons.

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In photo #2 above and the one below, notice the RenCen of Detroit.

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American Mariner came out of Buffalo in 1979 at 730′ x 78′ x 45.’

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So with a light load, yes.

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Her capacity is 37,200 tons.

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I don’t know if she ever leaves the Upper Lakes.

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Chemtrans Elbe is a saltie, so obviously she’s a global traveler.  She was built in Korea in 2009 and measures 423′ x 75.’

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Edzard Schulte was built in China in 2011, 475′ x ’75.’

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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