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Soon after this shot, the queen of hearts and troupe danced for the judges with this on a loud sound box.  That makes for a good day, even though I can’t remember Alice, a rabbit, or the dormouse.  But that’s one of the things I love about the parade . . . good music and dancing.

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After then parade, Gypsy Funk Squad played on . . .  Here’s my phone-recorded sample of King Jack Neptune playing the oud, with a mermaid queen, percussion and dancers.  Hear more oud–related to the lute–here.

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Of course, Dick D. Zigun, honorific mayor of Coney Island,  always leads off the parade with his drum and band.

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I’ve never seen this sort of Mexican dancer in the parade, but they surely raised the bar for quality.

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And of course, mermaids can make politics much more palatable than most politicians or media marketeers.

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But mostly, it’s exuberant music and ecstatic dancing.

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How many starfish have you seen trumpeting?

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And high octane drumming overcomes stasis.

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Enjoy the photos, the solstice, and the strawberry moon.

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Click here for mermaid parade years and here for annual solstice mermaid migration years.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who WAS a judge!

 

NYC DEP has a diverse set of vessels in its fleet, from sludge tankers to this water quality testing vessel.  It even had a skimmer at one point called Cormorant.

HSV (hydrographic survey vessel) Osprey has been around for a quarter century already.  I caught it being refurbished here earlier the spring.

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Here she is under way a rainy morning a few years back.

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Now osprey and cormorant are winged creatures.  And I’m posting one hour earlier today so that more of you reading this can still make it to the annual migration of winged and scaly creatures coming ashore on Coney Island, and that’s where I’ll be, documenting my heart out in the name of science, of course.  STEM needs you.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts with references to wind.  Sunday and Monday were windy but commerce went right on.

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The weight of these units is manifested by the smooth ride in the harbor chop.  Offshore it would be a different matter in the swells.

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I wouldn’t call it spindrift, so maybe

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it’s just spray?

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All photos last weekend by Will Van Dorp.

And here, thanks to Aleksandr Mariy and unrelated but interesting, it’s Black Douglas, in its many forms.  And if you like that, you’ll love Roosevelt, especially that photo off Newburgh NY.

And finally, thanks to Isaac Pennock, who caught Dylan Cooper down bound passing Detroit on a run between Green Bay and Montreal.

I started a series called transitioning, but here’s something new.  Actually I did a transit post a few years back when a Boston ex-fireboat transited the sixth boro on its way to  Lake Huron to reinvent as a dive boat.

This post started with Glenn Raymo catching a shot of NOAA 5503 northbound in Poughkeepsie.

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Then, unprompted, Mike Pelletier, engineer of Urger noticed it between locks 2 and 3 in Waterford, westbound.  When I noticed it on AIS, southbound on the Welland, I knew she was doing a long haul.  So here’s what I’ve since learned:  this vessel “was transferred to NOAA from the CG in Fort Macon NC.  Its final destination is Muskegon MI,  where it will undergo a full overhaul and be refit for service as a research vessel on the Great Lakes.”   Many thanks to Glenn, Mike, and my other sources.

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But if NOAA is transiting far, Sand Master is going much much farther.  Any ideas what HN RTB is?

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Here’s a photo of Sand Master I got just over a month ago at the Great Lake just west of the Bayonne Bridge.

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Try Roatán, Honduras.

Thanks all for the photos and the information.  And please help keep eyes open for unique transiting vessels and those who work mostly here.

Barrel comes up with unusual photos . . . and this one below,  Merritt,  shows a side-cast dredge with a draft of less than 5′.

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It appears she’s still in use.

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Here’s the info.

bb1USACE DREDGE MERRITT FACT SHEET-2

I wish that tree was not obscuring the tug, but the real star here is the ship, an oddity that began life in the last years of the nineteenth century as a battleship, BB-5.   The first in her class was USS Indiana, BB-1. 

bb1USS Kearsarge as crane ship AB-1 transiting Panama canal

After 20 years as a battleship, she was idled for 20 years, at which point she was converted into arcane ship, Crane Ship No. 1, with lifting capacity of 250 tons, a weight more impressive then than now.  It does qualify this as a “second lives” post, though.  Finally, in 1955, she was sold as scrap.

bb2USS Kearsarge FORMER BATTLE AHIP CONVERTE4D TO CRANE SHIP PHILA NAVY YARD 1923

Click here for navsource’s great photo documentation–including the dramatic graving dock view below– of her entire half century career.

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Here’s a 1936 derrick boat, with a sign over the stern house that would get my attention.

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I’m not sure when she went out of service.

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Many thanks to barrel for these glimpses into the archives.

Given the history and range of projects of Elsbeth II, you might imagine how thrilled I was to see her for the first time yesterday.  And she has to be among a small set of working vessels based in North America with brightwork!  She truly fits under the category exotic.

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I saw this tugboat six years ago in the Delaware River, but Sarah D looks spanking new  in NYS Marine Highway colors.

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Happy flag day.  Do you know the significance of this date?

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OSG Courageous, she’s one large tugboat and an infrequent

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visitor in this port.  I can’t quite make out the barge name. Of course, she’s not as colossal as her big sister –OSG Vision–who spent some time here . . . four (!!) years ago.

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Sassafras is a fixture in the sixth boro, but she rarely looks as good as she does when many shore dwellers in the other boros are just waking up.  Here she

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lies alongside Petali Lady.

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Mister Jim here is lightering (?) bulker Antigoni B, who seems to have since headed upriver.

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And since this is called random tugs, let me throw in two photos from the Digital collections of the New york State archives . . . SS Brazil entering the sixth boro on May 31, 1951.  What the photo makes very clear to me is how much traffic in the harbor has changed in 65 years.   Can anyone identify the six tugboats from at least three different companies here?  I can’t.

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Here the party passes a quite different looking Governors Island.

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All photos except for the last two by Will Van Dorp.  These last two come from a treasure trove aka Digital Collections of the New York State Archives. 

Unrelated:  If you’re free Saturday, it’s the annual mermaid migration on Coney Island.

 

and so much more!  Never have I seen so many barges in such close proximity one to another.  What if you woke up and saw this from your bunk?

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I’d thought to call this a whatzit post, but

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the prime mover is a tug I’d long hoped to see . . . Elsbeth II, of the Smith Maritime fleet, and that link is to Burkhard Bilger’s article from the New Yorker a few years back.

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6000 hp and three screws.

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Built in Palatka, Florida, Sarah D was another of my subjects this morning, since she’s a new acquisition for NYS Marine Highway.  .

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I never got her and the tow–aka Atlanta Bridge–in the same frame until here. Cargo barge Atlanta Bridge has transported some interesting cargoes.

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Here Sarah D has pulled ahead of Elsbeth II.

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You can see how windy it has been for the past 24+ hours in the sixth boro.

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I hope there’s someone upriver getting photos of the ballasting and floating off, aka the second half of the FLO-FLO ops.

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The first photo comes from Seaman Sou-Sobriquet, whom I thank;  all the others were taken by Will Van Dorp.

 

Part of the way up in the Chesapeake watershed, Roaring Bull works daily for the better part of the year.   Take a ride on it.  from Harrisburg I-81, it’s a mere 30 miles north.  From West Milton I-80, 40 miles south.

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Baltimore . . . 100 miles, Philly 130, NYC 200, and Pittsburgh 225;  and

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and it’s lost in time.

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It’s a must-see, and inspected by the USCG.

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Unlike double ended ferries, this one has the best bow and stern thrusters.

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with a name that conjures up this taurus pining for love. 

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And yes, it’s in a part of the Susquehanna River valley where there are lots of horses pulling buggies.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  For sights and sounds of the ferry under way, click here and here.

Oleander has to be the most regular ship coming into the sixth boro.  Put it this way:  if it’s Thursday, Oleander will arrive from Bermuda, the B in BCL.

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Ever Diamond seems basically to shuttle between eastern Asia and eastern US.

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Some day I should see how many of the 10 Ever Dainty-class of Evergreen Marine container ships I have photos of in the sixth boro.

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IMHO, vessels like Anthem of the Seas are most interesting under some unusual light, like dawn here last week.

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I lamented the fact there were no dancers in the glass ball.

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MV Loujiane Loujaine is part of GBX, serving, I gather, as both bulk storage of cementitious material and movie set.

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Has anyone ever seen photos of Loujaine, ex-Abu-Loujaine, ex-Bahma . . . arriving in the sixth boro?  She must have arrived here at some point in the 1990s, by the photo comments here.

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Over in Walkabout Bay in the spot where Alice often discharges, Pagona was working the other day.

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Rounding out the post, it’s the vessel everyone in NYC should be familiar with, especially her being in proximity to the bridge she nearly brought down.  Recognize her?

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It’s Chemical Pioneer.   During the decade I’ve been watching she’s been a hardworking vessel, but

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here’s the NTSB report.  Click here for one of her ITB fleet mates, now scrapped.

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All photos, WVD.

 

See the US flag flying off the stern here and

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here?

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That makes this 1999 built container vessel somewhat unique among traffic in the Kills.

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Enjoy it.

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I’m not sure what purpose that primer-red upfolded arm serves or what it’s called.   rs4

Here Ellen McAllister 

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retrieves the docking pilot.

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while Robert continues the assist.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s still out cat fishing.   And while the fish were not biting, I read this Rick Bass collection, which I highly recommend if you’re looking to read.

 

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