Paris this springtime has seen new waterfronts, quite miserable for anyone wedded to the old margins.  Click on the image to read the story.

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But I’m not focusing here on “paris,” but rather “pairs” that have been “pairing” around the sixth boro.  And that appears to be Flinterland over beyond the warehouses just arrived from Paramaribo.   Both Paris and Paramaribo are on my list of “gotta got there soon” places.  In the foreground and eastbound on the East River, it’s Foxy 3 and Rae.

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I caught Marie J Turecamo and Mary Turecamo doing the do-see-doe allemand left recently just off Caddell.

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The background margins seemed to be trying to add a script.

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With the Turecamos, the background served as a record of change on the Bayonne Bridge.

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And Mary appears to have just had a makeover.

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And what’s this on the margin of the sixth boro and Brooklyn . .  other than a surplus military vessel in the Navy yard?  Here’s a previous allusion to IX-514.

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Are there pairs in those boxes?  Yes, I know these are the flocks of pigeons that are said to create art when they fly.  Here though in daylight they look like Joseph Perkins boxes with living creatures in them, mimicking a microcosm of the residents of NYC.

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But I’ve somehow gotten myself off topic, but no matter, it’s springtime.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who took a break from catfishing and stumbled onto an answer thanks to the site naturalareasnyc.org.  According to them, NYC includes over 76,000 acres of open water, i.e., the sixth boro.  That number of acres converts to about 119 square miles (mi2).  Manhattan, in comparison is only 23 mi2.

Here are the other land boros’ areas:

Bronx, 42 mi2

Staten Island,  58 mi2

Brooklyn, 71 mi2

Queens, 109 mi2

And size matters.  It’s time for the 119-acre-boro to have its own official name and status.

OK, I’ll hand this back to the robots and reel in my catfish.

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