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Let’s stay in Leiden for two more posts. Here’s a 3:32 minute time lapse showing the city, about the same size population as Elizabeth NJ.

The Dutch seem to understand the touristic attraction of old boats, making available–I was told–free docking for vessels fitting certain parameters of restoration. They’re yachts, no longer work boats although they COULD do light work.    I wandered until I located the docks for old tugboats.  This “block” is about 1000′ north of the one we saw yesterday here, just south of the first “o” in “Noorderkwartier” in the map below.

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From a bridge looking east, we see the 1916 Amor first in line and she’s for sale (“te koop“).

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Then looking north from the same spot, that’s Gerda on the left and Alba on the right.  We’ll get back to Alba at the end of this post.

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Here’s a side view of Gerda, about which I found no information.

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Let’s walk northward along the land side of photo above, Oude Herengracht Straat.   The third boat back in the photo above is Lodewijck, 

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a 1927 build.

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Notice her towing hook.

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This one, Grietje, two farther northward along the right side of the photo #2 above.

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Notice her pelican hook for towing.

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Behind her is Obsessie, dating from 1925.  Click here for an incomplete alphabetical listing of the restored tugboat fleet, aka motorsleepboot vloot.

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Here she is as seen from the other side of the canal.

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Jan dates from 1920.

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Here were are on the other side looking at the first in line in photo #2 above.  Alba is a beauty that dates from 1911.  Click here for another set of her.

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These and others–actual steam vessels–will make their way through the waterways to events like this one in late May.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will post about a different historic vessels “block” in Leiden tomorrow.

 

I’m back at the helm and have switched the robots off.  I’ve been in Netherlands (Nederland, in the language), which translates as “low lands.”  Where it’s low, you find water, of course, and where you have water, you’ll find boats and bridges.

You also find moats.  See the jagged blue rectangle in map below showing the center–the historical starting point–of the city of Leiden, a city of 122,000 midwayish between Rotterdam and Amsterdam.  All the photos in this post show one” block” of the Nieuwe Rijn (New Rhine), attached to the Oude (old) Rijn.   In fact, the Nieuwe Rijn (NR) is only a little over a mile channelized portion of the Oude Rijn, a 30-mile stretch of river no longer attached to the Rhine, the 750-mile river that everyone knows.  Think oxbow lakes along the Mississippi, only straight.

Imagine the blue rectangle as a clock;  you locate this one-block area on the map below at around the 4:00 position of the moat, at the intersection of the NR and the Herrengracht, a main vertical canal you can see there.

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At this intersection there’s this old fuel barge.

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I don’t know if it still functions.

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Here’s the real focus of this post, low airdraft tugs like Jason.  The wheelhouse roof and windows are hinged, as you can see in this short video where Jason tows a barge through one of these low bridges.

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See the blue/white sign near the left center;  it reads “Herrengracht.”  I love the paint job on that Smart.

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The blue tour boats are operated by a company called “bootjes en broodjes,” or small boats and rolls.

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Eat. Drink. Tour.   Also, learn about Leiden.  Talk.  Duck!

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And among low air draft tugs in this block of waterway, here’s the real focus, the tug on the waterside of the small covered barge is called Triton.

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Notice the fuel barge and Jason?   In a lot of places in the waterways in Leiden, those smooth but curved top barges have seating on them as bars and restaurants.

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Here’s Triton with a house to get out of the weather.  She’s 100 years old exactly, a mere youngster compared with the buildings surrounding the waterways.

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Triton reminds me a lot of Augie and Heidi.

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Now if the spelling “rijn” seemed familiar, think of this guy . . . a favorite son whom we all know by his first name, Rembrandt.

Many more Dutch photos to come;  remember this is just one block of waterway. All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

I’ve taken this photo from Facebook, on a thread started by Aleksandr Mariy.  He wondered what it was.

Look at the stern, the shape of the house, and the bow apart from the upper bulwarks shaped up to and around the bowsprit.

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Speculation in that thread was  and I change the words slightly and add a few of my own   . . . old Moran tug that got turned into a sailboat back in 1983. Work was done at a yard in Port Arthur. Wheelhouse was moved to aft position, bulwarks modified, bowsprit and masts added. Believe it was one of the Thomas Morans, maybe the 1926 one. It was a diesel electric. Owner was a Moran captain who planned to go tuna fishing with it.

Anyone want to weigh in?  Does anyone have photos either before or after?

And while I’m commenting on FB, here’s a photo shared there by Robert Silva, showing self-propelled barge Toledo Sun from days of yore.

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Click here to see it out of the water, showing although not clearly enough the power configuration.  Anyone know the manufacturer of the propulsion?  I believe she’s now operating out of Singapore as Marine Success.   Here’s more of the Sun Oil fleet.   Is this the same vessel?

 

 

 

Let’s start with Marie J. Turecamo (1968).  And then let’s look at others out around this springtime morning:

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Like Joan Turecamo (1980), built near the confluence of the Hudson River and Erie Canal,

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heading out here with James D. Moran (2015);

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Caitlin Ann (1961) doing a recycling run;

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Emerald Coast (1973) leaving the U-Haul;

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North Sea (1982) heading for the Kirby yard;

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Robert E. McAllister (1969) heading out for a ship;

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Quenames (1982) moving a barge alongside;

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Crystal Cutler (2010) getting some maintenance; and

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that brings us back to Marie J. Turecamo and a photo taken only a minute of so before the lead-off photo in this post.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous 6.  If you want to guess what these are, try;  then check against the answers below.

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And the order is Wavertree starboard bow, Ever Lyric starboard bulb with Ellen McAllister and Liberty IV in the distance, line between c-ship and Kirby Moran, house of MSC Luisa, decorative welds on a backhoe bucket, stern of a twin-screw tug, panama chocks on CMA CGM Dalila, and container bracing gear in use.

All photos taken recently by Will Van Dorp.

Liberty Island is a Wisconsin-built dredge from 2002.  Here’s a long history of other vessels from her same yard.

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Here’s Swarna Mala (2010) being lightered by Dolphin and Quantico Creek and anchored slightly south of Fidelity II (2011).

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White Pearl (1985) ha left the sixth boro and is headed for

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Veracruz.

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UASC vessel Al-Kharj heads for sea.

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It almost looks like a container escaped off the deck of CMA CGM Dalila  and is now southbound on 440, along with three persons of interest walking in the same direction.

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That can’t happen, right?

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A deep-laden Maersk Sarnia meets Barney Turecamo near the same bridge.

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And we will call it quits here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has left the robots in charge of posting them.

 

I should have waved . . .

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I can’t imagine what they were thinking . . .

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Evergreen operates 30 of the L-type vessels;  others have names like Ever Logic, Ever Lively, Ever Liberal, Ever Lawful, Ever Learned . . .

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Of course the fourth largest container fleet  operates other classes also.

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Evergreen founder Chang Yung-fa died earlier this year.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Frying Pan came back to Pier 66 yesterday after several months at Caddell Dry dock, assisted by Dorothy J.  I use this photo with permission from Renee Lutz Stanley.

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It turns out that I also recently received a photo and spec sheet from barrel, formerly of the US Army Corps of Engineers.  When I looked up where Liston, the vessel below, was built, I

Tug Liston

 

tug liston build sheet

learned that it was being built the same time as the lightship listed as Frying Pan Shoal.  First, it makes me wonder whether a photo exists that shows them both on the ways.  Second, I wondered if there was an error in shipyard site here about the initial name of the lightship, or if there was a time when the word “shoal” got dropped from the name of the vessel.  Third, the shipyard site says that LV115 became a museum in Southport, NC.  Click here and scroll through for a photo I took in Southport five years ago showing where some folks had wanted to build a museum with LV115 as the centerpiece, but it had never happened.

Some years ago, I used to spend a good amount of summer evening time at Frying Pan/Pier66.  If you’ve never been, you should try it once.  Here are some photos I took way back then. I must have many more somewhere.  Pier 66 opens in early May, and I think it’s time to have a large gathering there once again.  Let’s agree on a date and meet there, eh?

Many thanks to Renee and barrel for use of these photos.

But a closing shot, barrel writes:  “USACE TUG LISTON    became ARGUS of Salter Towing in 1970. #561597. At a later date became fishing vessel MR. J.C. now out of documentation.”

USACE TUG LISTON

Why gild then lily?  Why add a lot of text when a well-operated machine looks this good?

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For a curriculum vitae of this machine, click here.

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All photos byWill Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts in this series.

And today, April 1, I’m not fooling;  Noble Maritime Collection is a “must see” in NYC.  You can actually see their buildings from the KVK, just west of the salt pile.  Their latest exhibition is called “Robbins Reef Lighthouse:  A Home in the Harbor,” a collection of works by contemporary artists asked specifically to depict the light.  The painting below “The Barbican of the Kill van Kull” is by Pamela Talese.

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What follows below are just a few of the pieces from that one exhibit.

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The photo above is by Michael Falco.

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William Behnken and

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L. F. Tantillo 

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and others also have pieces.  If you’ve never been to the museum and you devote two hours to all the fine maritime treasures there, you’ll still feel rushed.

Here and here and here are some previous posts I’ve done about the museum.

 

 

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