You are currently browsing the monthly archive for September 2015.

Click here for this series.  “Fifth dimension” designates these as not contemporary, i.e., archival.

“HT” here is Harry Thompson, who sent me these photos, all from 1986.  I’m not going to say much about the photos because I don’t know much.   I was not in New York then.  I will say what I know, but please  . . . comment away.

Elise M was then a Poling boat;  now you might know her as Morgan Reinauer.

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The three identifiable boats here are all still around:  Jane McAllister is in Eastport, Dragon Lady is now Bridgeport, and Mary Turecamo is still Mary Turecamo.   Anyone know the excursion vessel and container ship out beyond?

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Here’s another of Dragon Lady.

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Dragon Lady . . . has been mentioned, Tilly has had a sad demise, and Emily S I have no info about.  There is a fourth tugboat beyond Emily S, but I can’t identify it.

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Here’s another of Tilly and an unidentified Berman vessel beyond here. Tilly was built in the Bronx.

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This is a CROWDED harbor as it’s not seen anymore.  I can’t identify anything there, but it reminds me of a hypothetical photo I’d love to see . . . Grand Erie (scroll)  was in the harbor for this centennial celebration of Lady Liberty.  Might anyone have a photo of her in the harbor for that fest?

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And we’ll end here with a mystery three-masted schooner.  Anyone identify her?

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All photos by Harry Thompson . . . and done on film.  More tomorrow, so please send in your comments now.

Sometimes I get queries about collaboration;  I really enjoy doing it like this.

Unrelated:  Here are the results of the Erie Canalway photo contest.

T-boats are up today, and seeing some in Baltimore led me into the archives.  Click here for a short history of Carina, a T-boat I saw in Clayton NY but never got a good photo of.   Here’s a database of the existing ones, although the info looks dated. Here’s another article on T-boats and Sea Scouts.

Enjoy.  Higgins hull #424 from 1952.

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taken in January 2011

Higgins hull 434 from 1952

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taken in September 2015

Higgins hull 504 from 1953

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taken in September 2015

Higgins hull 513 from 1953

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taken in July 2014

same boat . . . stern

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All photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but fascinating to me:  the October 2015 National Geographic article on river transport on the Congo River in the DRC.  The article describes conditions not unlike those I encountered on my travels on the River in 1973 and 1974.  Click here for a post I did about that time.

Totally related:  Here’s the book to read on Higgins.

 

Here’s looking back at the Maryland Rte 213 Bridge at Chesapeake City, as we exit the C & D Canal and enter the Chesapeake at sunrise.

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On call on the north side of the waterway is Delaware Responder, one of a fleet of 15 nationwide.  Here and here I’ve previously posted.

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We pass the unmistakeable Dann Marine docks and

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head into the Chesapeake, water level of the largest watershed in the East, which stretches northward nearly to the Mohawk and the Erie Canal.   The area is the southern end of a flyway that extends to the Saint Lawrence.

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You’d think that almost obscured light would be called Eagle Point Light, but the turkey gets the name.

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The Bay sees a lot of traffic, although Amara Zee, a traveling theatre show,  has to be one of the more unique vessels navigating it.  I have more photos of Amara Zee, which I saw up close more than 10years ago, but I’ll put them up only if I hear from readers about experience with the group, which traveled from the Hudson to the Saint Lawrence, could not enter their homeport in Canada without being arrested, and are now headed south for winter shows.   Note Turkey Point Light in the distance directly off the stern.

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The Chesapeake is to crabs as Maine water is to lobster.

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Aerostats, though, surprised me.  This one is over 200′ loa, in spite of its appearance.  The tether is monitored by

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patrols from APG, Aberdeen Proving Ground, a facility that replaced the outgrown Sandy Hook Proving Ground.

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As this post began with a bridge, so it ends . . . the Key Bridge marks the entrance to Baltimore.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Following up from yesterday’s post . . . tug Chesapeake is larger, more powerful than the other Patapsco-class tugs.  It also has more windows in the wheelhouse.  In addition, the photos of Chesapeake and Susquehanna were taken in Baltimore and Savannah, resp.; not in NYC’s sixth boro as were the others.

For today I’ll start with a mystery tug, one I’ve not found any info on.

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I’d love to know more.

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Also, in Baltimore, it’s Annabelle Dorothy Moran.

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Click here to see my first shots of Annabelle almost three years ago as she sailed underneath the Brooklyn Bridge.

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And another boat I know nothing about . . . McL?

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Donal G. McAllister is Baltimore’s McAllister ex-YTB.

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New England Coast is another boat I’d never seen before . . . docked here at the Dann Marine base in Chesapeake City, MD.

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And approaching Chesapeake City from the south, it’s Calusa Coast, a frequent visitor to the sixth boro. I photographed her first here, over eight years ago.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous posts in this series, and I’m finding that in the four years since the last installment, things have changed . . . and not.  Most of these boats haven’t appeared in the previous four.    The livery and logo remain the same, but there are some new boats.  Can you figure out how two of the following photos differ from then others?

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Chesapeake, launched 2006

Once while listening on VHF, I thought there was a new boat in town called “honey creek.”

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Hunting Creek, 2011

 

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Quantico Creek, 2010

 

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Wicomico, 2005

 

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Red Hook, 2013

 

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Tangier Island, 2014

 

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Fells Point, 2014

 

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Susquehanna, 2006 with Savannah

 

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Christian . . .  1981

 

So, obviously, Christian, being a crew boat, differs from all the others.   Another difference, though, is that Chesapeake and Susquehanna were not photographed in the sixth boro.  Identifying one location might be easier than the other.  Guesses?

By the way, I know I’ve seen Kings Point, but I seem not to have a photo.

Answer soon.

Here’s the series . . . .

And the intention of this post is to prompt a discussion, not just be vain.  Let me explain:  thanks to HL for taking this photo the other day during a 33-hour delivery of a Nautor Swan 42 from NY to Baltimore.  Off NJ, conditions were described as a confused sea.

The reason for the photo and this post is to ask about seasickness, which I’ve never experienced but this time I did.  I lost breakfast as soon as we departed the Ambrose Channel and set sail.  I’d taken dramamine, but it only made me drowsy.  Ironically, between gags, I felt very happy;  stomach sick but spirits good.  It hurt to talk much but smiles soothed.  And when I was told to steer a course, all was better.

Here’s a set of 50 suggestions for dealing with seasickness I found on gCaptain.   A dear friend wrote that there are two kinds of people:  those who get seasick and those who haven’t YET.  My brother traveled to Vietnam by ship, said he was seasick for weeks, and has scorned water travel every since.  I used to pack a ginger root when I went fishing and keep a slice between my teeth and inner cheek.

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Thanks to HL for sharing the photo.

You might enjoy this article on the subject from the Atlantic.

Sail Amsterdam ended a month ago, but these photos come from a relative who works for Dutch law enforcement and could mingle freely with his vessel.  Thanks cousin.

New Yorkers should easily recognize this vessel, in spite of some slightly different trappings.

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Guayas, the Ecuadorian tall ship, called in the sixth boro three years ago.  

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Guayas was assisted by Aaron on the bow.  Can anyone identify the tug hanging on the stern?  Aaron appeared here once a year ago.

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Sirius is an Iskes tug that outpowers Aaron by about four-fold.

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Steam tug Scheelenkuhlen (70′ x 21′ x 6′ draft and 65 tons) dates from 1927.

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Anny, built 1957, has a telescoping wheelhouse visible here and works Amsterdam’s canals, as seen here.

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A876 Hunze, launched 1987, is one of five large tugs operated by the Royal Dutch Navy.

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Shipdock VI measures 52′ x 13.’

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I can’t tell you much about Jan.

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Voorzan III dates from 1932.  Stadt Amsterdam has called in the sixth boro several times.

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Triton 2008 is another Iskes tug. 

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They’re all beauties . . . from Zeetijger to

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Maasstroom.

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And this has to be a tanker that delights when she calls into port at the end of the day.

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Let’s call it quits for today with a tug operated by the Port of Amsterdam . . . PA5 aka Pollux

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All photos by “Hans Brinker.”

She’s here–to the right–it’s Manhattan II, Classic Harbor Line’s latest tour boat in the sixth boro.  The Manhattans operate parts of three seasons.

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And along the same stretch of dock, earlier this year was Lady May, a 150′ Feadship.  Last year in Netherlands, I kayaked with a Feadship employee who loved building these vessels but loved kayaking the canals there even more.

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Also, back in August I espied Knickerbocker on the Sound, so I came down to North Cove to see her close up.

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I’m not sure the size of her crew. Anyone know?  And where does one apply?

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Here’s more of the Scarano sixth boro fleet.

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Here’s a Robert Frank article inside a recent edition of the NYTimes about a 274′ Feadship yacht with a crew of 26 and a hybrid power plant capable of 18 knots.

Click here and here for some other megayachts.  Here’s a Feadship heading out to sea.

 

Click on the image below and enjoy the music.  Come out and hear this traditional American music by the Paradise Mountain Boys–and stories about the port of New York history this coming Thursday night in Red Hook.  Details here.

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I hope you listened to the song above.  Here’s the kicker:  the band is from Norway.  Here’s their take on “Man of constant sorrow,” one of my favorites.

For the Red Hook connection, here’s Lars Nilsen, co-chairman of the Norwegian Immigrant Association, “One hundred plus years ago, Red Hook ( including what is now Carroll Gardens ) was the center of a hard-working maritime-related Norwegian speaking community of about 10,000 people.”  And here’s a thought from John Weaver, son-in-law of Alf Dryland, deceased Captain of PortSide NewYork’s flagship  Mary A. Whalen “Norwegians in America playing Blue Grass music! If Alf Dyrland were still with us, he would be smiling. Every new adventure is the continuation of his dream come true. He would be proud of the heritage celebrated and future welcomed aboard his Mary Whalen. Thank you PortSide NewYork.”

Click here for Rick “old salt” blog’s take on this event.

Here are a few of the many posts I’ve done on PortSide NewYork.

Unrelated, here’s another unlikely interpretation of American bluegrass performed at South by Southwest.

 

Tis the season . . .  to keep your eyes and ears on the weather.  In 1938 . . . before hurricanes had names or we had satellites to track them thousands of miles off, a big one came ashore on Long Island, a once-a-century-or-longer storm.   Do you know this structure below?

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Here’s the ocean side view . . .

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and the inland side.  To the right and up the Acushnet River are the ports of

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New Bedford and Fairhaven.  Click here for info and photos on the building of the barrier.

The benchmark storm for the sixth boro is Sandy, and an event this past weekend happened on a location wiped out by the storm, Rockaway Beach at 106th Street.  Click here for posts/photos from my friend Barbara that chronicle the before/after in that part of NYC.  Welcome to the first annual Poseidon parade.

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and a temporary replacement for Whalemina, the glacial erratic rolled away by Sandy.

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Of the 10 worst hurricanes of the 20th century (judged by impact on the US), almost all happened  in September.  Since that link leaves off Katrina (??), I add this one.

Thanks to Barbara Barnard for the Poseidon Parade photos;  the ones from the Achushnet are by Will Van Dorp, who will have photos from up the Acushnet soon.   Technically, this fits into my “other watersheds” series.

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