Below is one of my all time favorite photos of Pegasus, taken July 4, 2012.   In fact, a print of this hangs over my dining room table.  The boat that night was in her 105th year.  Click here if you don’t remember life in 1907, when her keel was laid.   If you are unfamiliar with her long and storied life, click here on the Pegasus Preservation Project site.

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The Erie Lackawanna terminal in Hoboken also dates from 1907.

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She received a visit from an even older Urger in July 2012.

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Pegasus (1907) with Urger (1901) at Pier 25

An important announcement follows at the end of this post, so for now, enjoy these looks back.

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Sizing up Lincoln Sea in September 2012

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The tug and barge campaign, August 2011

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She had a major dry-docking five years ago.

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At Caddell Dry Dock in March 2010

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Meanwhile over the years, lots of people have fulfilled their dreams of “riding on a tugboat” aboard Pegasus.

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Some will remember this trip for the rest of their lives.

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“Tug Pegasus Moving On

The tug Pegasus is looking for new leadership, new ideas and ultimately a new home. After many years of hard work and hundreds of thousands of funding raised for capital improvements, the 1907 Tugboat Pegasus has been lovingly restored to a ship shape condition and is no longer in debt. Since 2001, under the care of the Tug Pegasus Preservation Project, the popular vessel has educated tens of thousands about the importance of the NY Harbor as a vital water highway. Tug trips and work programs taught youth about maritime jobs. Tug & Barge ports-of-call included tour visits to Hoboken, NJ and Brooklyn Bridge Park, Hudson River Park, Poughkeepsie, Kingston, Cold Spring and Hudson in New York.

However, after being awarded a berth at Hudson River Park’s Pier 25 in 2011, the organization continually experienced difficulty obtaining the necessary funds required to operate a historic boat as well as keep up with the high costs of insurance associated with getting the public onto the water. Regrettably, we are no longer able to sustain our operations.

Tug Pegasus Preservation Project is looking for exciting and creative ideas that will help transition the boat to a new leader or another organization that will continue the mission of getting the public out onto the water and informing them about vitality of New York Harbor’s maritime activity and it rich culture.

One thought we have is what the City of Baltimore has in a historic ships maritime alliance. Instead of each vessel having the arduous tasks of writing grants, raising administrative funds, insurance, etc., an umbrella organization spreads the costs and time requirements between a host of historic vessels.

As a positive solution is sought, the Board of Trustees of the Tugboat Pegasus Preservation Project welcomes serious individuals to present their ideas and proposals by contacting them at pamela@tugpegaus.org. And while our hope had been to continue operations this summer, without funding, we will not be able to do so. We thank those who have supported our project over the years.”

While you contemplate that announcement, enjoy one more Pegasus photo.   I’d be happy if this blog could serve as a discussion board of Pegasus‘ future.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for previous “whitherward” posts.

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