Here was 25.

Read those place names:  Shellsea, Rowboaten, Flushwick, Rikers Reef, and Yankee Aquarium.  Then there are landmasses like CUNY Island.  The map called NY Sea is the creation of Jeffrey Linn, an Urban Planner/Designer, focusing primarily on walkable communities and Safe Routes to School issues. He writes, “I do a lot of mapping and GIS in my career. These maps are a bit of a tangent, but I’ve always focused on how sea level rise will impact cities, so it fits in well with my urbanist background.  What got me interested in creating these maps is a fascination with how landscapes can change over time.”  Jeffrey adds that although it can be “depressing for some to look at the maps . . .  the place names help to lighten the mood.”

Click on the map itself for more of Jeffrey’s work.   I wonder what the sixth boro would look like if there map were extended about 40 miles in either direction.  I know Mount Mitchill (scroll) would be the high point of the area.  And as water levels rise, there may be a day like Seth Tane captures here in the subway . . .

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For a similar treatment of San Francisco, click here.

And vessels currently or recently in the sixth boro . . . I wish I’d gotten a photo of Ernest Hemingway.

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And this one . . . Ice Base, which I noticed the first time bowsprit one day when my imagination was working faster than my eyes, and I saw Ice BABE.    At least I though I did.  Well, previously I had seen and my camera still thinks it saw Surfer Rosa!

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Then last week . .  I saw Charles Oxman venture into the Kills for the first time in ages with destination Casablanca.  Seriously, I thought it had been sold foreign!  In fact it was headed to the newly dubbed Rio Blanco, a fitting moniker for the frozen North River, which appears only briefly some years.

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As I write this from just west of Murky City and Bergen Bar . . . I am grateful to Jeffrey Linn for use of his intriguing maps, another of which you can see here.