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This was the Narrows at 0730 this morning.

I joined the ‘scapegoats for morning contemplation . . . to the east and

north.  That orange tanker down there, they said, had a name I’d find interesting.    But I couldn’t read it yet.

Below us, yacht Dofle Dust was bound for sea past Ratna Shalini.

A closeup showed this was Dodge Island, not Padre Island, as I’d supposed.

The camouflaged goat was too busy scratching to notice that the herd had headed down the slope.

Wow!  SKS Tugela . . . what a name.  i should have gotten a closer-up shot.   And without google, I’d never have know a river by that name exists.

October dawn light is unique as it paints the stern here of Sea Valour.

Here’s a shot looking south  . . .

and another as I walked to catch the ferry.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who was actually hoping to catch anything but also Crowley Innovation, which sneaked into the Kills via Raritan Bay.

More accurately . . . I could call this “off Duty’s starboard,” as all this traffic passed Duty in a 45-minute period while she was herself “off duty” and on the hook in Gravesend Bay.   Less than 24 hours after I took these fotos, Duty raised the hook and sailed off south.

Two years back I snapped this foto of Duty out of the notch.   Here, if you doubleclick to enlarge the foto below, you can see two smudges on the horizon, one on either side.  Currently off Duty‘s starboard is a dredger . . . probably Padre Island.  Off her port is a Zim container ship.

And something astern of that . . . and

that!

Zim Tarragona is a regular in the sixth boro, although I’ve possibly never posted/identified a foto of her.

Following her is this array, and

outbound, meeting her is MSC Pilar, now Europe-bound.

Together those two vessels carried a lot of containers . . .

Next into the Narrows and meeting MSC Pilar are APL Garnet and a ketch (?) named Bee, about which I know nothing.

Pilar (okay . . . I just like that name) moves under the Bridge at 13 knots . . .

And as they move into the Upper Bay, APL Garnet and Bee meet

Histria Gemma, a sister of whom I included here some six months back.

All this traffic went unnoticed by this fisherman, who . . . by the way . . .  caught nothing from the depths either.

Next vessel in was the speedy Atlantic Compass, itself carrier of some mighty interesting cargoes.

And the final vessel of this 45-minute flurry of traffic . . . . Bow Clipper, previously featured here.  Out beyond Bow Clipper is the slope where the ‘scapegoats do roam.  Click here for a sense of her own roamings.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who  . . . during all this traffic, was wondering what was happening on Duty.

What I’ve ben reading lately?  Check out the Arthur Kill deepening project/blasting as negotiated by NYTugmaster here.

Happy 5th anniversary and the demise of Oriental Nicety at Oil-Electric here.

And how does a wind turbine blade arrive in Gloucester?  Check out Joey’s blog here.

Finally . . . from the NYTimes, a new museum in Antwerp looking like shipping containers here.

The glimpse I caught while crossing westbound on the Verrazano Bridge told me to head for Fort Wadsworth:  fog with defined geographical boundaries lay at least 175′ deep over the waters’ surface at the Narrows.  Once standing on the overlook at the fort, the stacks of  two vessels (l to r) Stuttgart Express and Celebrity Summit seemed not unlike the sails of two submarines, sub-fogs in this case.

Celebrity Summit was crawling forward bellowing like a lost bovine and

as it sank deeper, left a distinct wake.

When I say geographical boundaries, I mean dynamic ones, and they expanded upward as I watched.

Keeping watch over this shifting masses with me were the previously mentioned ‘scapegoats, the ones minding the grassroots, poison ivy roots,  . . . any sorts of roots on the slopes near the Fort.

After convincing the watchers that I was no more interested in their political predictions as in anyone else’s,  the spokesgoat suggested I follow Celebrity Summit‘s path to the stable, as he phrased it.

And this seemed as good a location as available.  Ongoing bellowings from the vessel confirmed my choice.

Celebrity Summit moves stern first into BCLCT.

The rising sun began to cut through the fog and project a golden sheen onto the low clouds lying on the waters of the Upper Bay.

Pegasus (last seen here last week) makes for the North River . . . taking the Celebrity Summit‘s bow.   Here’s a foto of Celebrity Summit sans fog and post-Irene.

Guiding Summit through much of her voyage through the fog is Laura K. Moran (I believe).

All fotos yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

Guess what this is?  I’ll call it T-time on Kraken.

Then this is T minus five minutes.  Note the orange mass just forward of the channel marker.

T minus five seconds!

Believe it or not . . . this is T PLUS five seconds.  So, there was a thud that resonated through the concrete barrier I braced myself behind on shore at least 600 feet away, and then the sound of spray seen in the first foto above.  But five seconds beyond . . . mist had dissipated and some gurgles formed in the water.

T plus fifteen seconds . . . the first bird arrives and the water turns muddy.

T plus a half minute, the gurgles have grown, appear grainy and muddy, and a yellowish mist forms.

One minute beyond . .  birds have heard the dinner bell . . . er . . . blast.

I wonder what the cormorant on lower right of center is thinking . . ..

Two minutes beyond . . .

And the zone reopens to traffic.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who has a blast every time he goes down to the water.  The last blast depicted on this blog–taken in Panama–was the final foto in this post from back in March.

I didn’t take these fotos quite right, but  . . . look closely, on the left side of the foto and the channel are three orange channel markers, as they appeared on October 10.  That’s Bayonne in the distance.  Behind the camera and off the right side is Howland Hook terminal.

Of course Patrick Sky cleared that nearest marker without a slightest scratch.

But a few days later . . . October 14 and after a tip-off, I returned and

only two markers remained.

Of course, Irish Sea and Bering Sea had nothing to do with the lost marker. Nor did Kraken.

But one was gone, vanished, disparu!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who hasn’t returned here since . . . but might there now only be one?  Click here for some background info on Patrick Sky.  The Kirby unit in the top foto is Beaufort Sea.

I thought I’d used this title before, but I was thinking about this one, backgrounds.  The idea here is similar.

From this angle, can you identify this vessel?

It’s a shipshape Pegasus!

From the same perspective, Justine McAllister and Franklin Reinauer leaving the KVK for the AK.

Ditto equally shipshape Mary Turecamo, from a perspective such that the visor practically obscures the house windows.

What’s the tale of three wakes . . . one recent and the others less so?

This is a good view of how a model bow fits snugly in the notch.

Where’s this and what’s this?  Although it looks like a building being overrun by tropical flora and fauna,

this might generate a different set of associations.

This was taken from the same  vantage point but with the camera pointed a bit higher yet, and it makes all the difference.

It’s OSC Vision entering the Upper Bay last weekend, giving new meaning to the term “shipshape.”  And the fauna here could be called landscaping goats . . . . or “scapegoats,” for short.

Two ships . . .  well, at least until you examine the farther one more closely.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who did this earlier goat homage here.

First, check “parrotlect flickrstream” along the left margin here for my favorite 45 fotos from the start of the Great Chesapeake Schooner Race last week.  I had posted some of them earlier, but put them up in the moment and without the benefit of my “foto-cleanup” tools.

Here is the real predecessor for this post . . . small specialized East coast designs.  And here’s a question . . . guess the loa and beam of this vessel.  Answer and fotos follow.

 Some small craft are just beautiful . . .  sweet

not to emphasize the “just” there.  Seriously sweet lines here.

And here. And nearby but in the shadows was a twin called Puffin.   And that vintage Johnson Sea horse 18 was attached to the

the prettiest motorboat I’ve ever seen.  I don’t think that Johnson comes with the blender attachment seen here!!

This is Silk.  Silk is a pushboat.  Believe it or not, it’s the prime mover for a 65′ skipjack, and while hauling for oysters, Silk needs to be hanging high and dry.  I regret I didn’t get a chance to look at the engine.

Stanley Norman dates from 1902.  And that boom looks impossibly long.

And here’s a surprise, maybe.  The vessel in the top foto here is a restored 1925 Hooper Island Draketail named Peg Wallace, measuring a belief-defying 37’6″ loa with a beam of only 6’8″!!  I’d written of local Chesapeake and southern boats here almost two years ago, but this was my first encounter with a draketail.  Scroll down to pete44′s comment here to learn his sense of the origin of the design.

I’d love to see her move through the water.

Draketail . . .  named for a duck.  Make way!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I’d seen McFarland before . . . once at the dock stern out and another time anchored in the middle of the night on Delaware Bay, lit up like a parking lot.  I’m so thrilled that I’ll run a series of her . . . .starting with the USACE dredge passing Pac Alnath.

A first sighting for me . . . Charles Burton.

Back to McFarland . . . one of four ocean-going hopper dredges operated by the USACE.  Can you name the other three?

. . . Nanticoke and Peter F. Gellatly, both pushing Vane barges.

Huge turntable on McFarland.

Chief . . . I believe the 1979 built vesel.

From this USACE publication, I like this statistic:  a full load of dredged materials McFarland carries equals the capacity of 310 dump trucks.

Just before sunrise, she steamed by . . . and passed B. Franklin Reinauer in the city of Benjamin Franklin himself.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

The other three dredges are Wheeler, Essayons, and Yaquina.   For comparison info about the four, click here.  For Bert Visser’s directory with fotos of all the large dredgers in the world, click here.

For a post on Delaware River tugs from 2010, click here.  What I’d like to see one of these days is the loading of livestock down in Wilmington.    Currently, Falconia is at the dock;  I saw her from the highway on Friday.

About a year ago, bright-eyed bowsprite caught a glimpse of USAV LCU-2011 running through the sixth boro.  Last week I knew another LCU was heading northward in the Chesapeake as the schooner race proceeded southward.  Little did I know I’d intersect with it at several points as I returned to the sixth boro myself.  The first visual contact I made at Fox Point State Park, along the Delaware between Wilmington and Chester, PA.    Fox Point’s namesake is S. Marston Fox, who inspired the Park’s creation from what had previously been a riverside dump, and of course many more positive things before that.   See the LCU way in the distance?

And this is looking back toward Wilmington (and the Delaware Memorial Bridge)  from near where the previous shot was taken.

I hope you didn’t think that mere speck above was the only view you’d have of Brandy Station.

The Commodore Barry Bridge and Philly Skyline are visible here.  I’d never have guessed the Commodore Barry was younger than the Verrazano.

To my surprise, a few hours later . . . I arrived at Penn’s Landing, et voila!

The Army has 35 of these vessels.

That’s the Ben Franklin Bridge in the background.

Our third encounter happened the next morning . . . as Brandy Station arced across the river and headed back to . . . . the Chesapeake!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s back in the sixth boro.

For an LCU high and dry, click here.  For LCUs worldwide, click here.

The sixth boro is the watery parts of what Mark Kurlansky calls the big oyster.  I try to share some insides of the big oyster most of the time in this blog.

But today you have a rare look inside the pearl,

Atlantic Pearl . . . ex-Pelican Arrow.

Rust was not the first thing I’d imagine I’d see inside the hold,

but shredded, uncoated ferrous metals in a moist environment . . .

yield rust.   She moved into Port Newark this morning escorted by Miriam Moran and Catherine Turecamo.

I’d like to know how often this pool is filled . . . .  Today was warm enough in the sixth boro to make a rust-removing soak seem welcoming.

Fotos get taken with the Bayonne Bridge in the background.

Bergen Point gets negotiated and

she moves into Port Newark byond these two Maersk box ships, Malacca and another . ..

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who had no idea he’d look into a pearl today.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

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My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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