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Small craft to come, but first . . . the missing foto from yesterday’s post . . . how DID the heaving line get through the eye aka “closed chock”?  Hope this foto helps;  I do believe I see the monkeyfist flying upward from the crewman at the rail;  crew on the upper level passed it to the crewman forward of the chock?

It’s been over two years since I’ve used this title. Small craft  come in many shapes,

are operated by professional mariners,

respond to emergencies with versatility,

and shuttle specialists between shore and much larger craft.

This one I first thought was transporting booms but now I think had some festive mission, given what appears to be a sizable bouquet over the engine compartment.

They operate for many agencies,

commercial entities,

government services, and

and law enforcement groups.

They work in diverse

weather, all

year round.

Enjoy a few more:

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who apologizes for not knowing who operates some of these small craft.

No, the crewman is not holding a meteor hammer readying for battle.  It’s a monkey’s fist, evidence that centuries’ old tools retain their usefulness.

How? you ask.  Let’s back up four minutes.  BW Hudson was making its final approach with Joan Turecamo and Laura K Moran assisting.   Note the crewman outlined up on the bridge of the tanker.

You and I can afford the distraction way up by Manhattan:  it’s Duncan Island bound for sea and Europe.  It left Ecuador just over a week ago and spent only about eight hours in Red Hook.

Laura K was hitting the brakes hard as they approached the dock.

That was when the crewman readied the fist to

fling it up to the rail so that

the heavier line could thread the eye and

be secured to Joan so that she too could put the brakes on.

Then slowly and precisely, the tanker was

pinned to the dock.    A lot more goes on in a docking, like dock line handling . . .  but I’ve already covered that here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.   If I read it right, BW Hudson arrived here directly from the Gulf, aka the Persian Gulf.  If you’re wondering why an Ecuadorian reefer vessel would be called “duncan island,” here’s an explanation for a place that’s also called Pinzón Island.

Last time I recall doing a docking post was here . . . pinning Eleonora.  And last time a monkey’s fist appeared was here . . . in Panama.

Here was 2, nearly three years ago.  I could also call this “some of the parts,” which is what I show . . . and you guess the rest.

We start with an easy one;  answer will be clear once you get through a half dozen or so.

The ladders are distinctive.

I airbrushed out the first name.

If you were out on the sixth boro today, you might know these next ones.

The gray one is Newtown Creek.

Not the same vessel as above.  Note the light at the Narrows far right.

Purrty sail!  And then the answers.

Top one was the schooner Pioneer.

Meredith C. Reinauer

Joan Turecamo

BW Hudson

Han Jin Chittagong

Basuto     Now I want to know what the relationship is between Stolt and Unicorn . . .   And Basuto is a South African word.

Stolt Efficiency

“Gunboat” catamaran Tiger Lily

And here’s the prize for putting up with my format:  America 2.0 heeling over in the stiff breeze of the Upper Bay this afternoon.

All fotos taken today by Will Van Dorp, who didn’t even expect to be here today.

 

 

Here was 20.  Endurance is not your run-of-the-mill RORO

design.   In fact, I’ve never seen one like her.

Endurance and her eight sister vessels do government work, as described in their mission statement here.  It hauled “assets” out of the Gulf when that season came.   Click here to see which ports she’s visited in the past six weeks alone!

NYK Delphinus is regular NYK vessel that shuttles between the sixth boro and China (with some other stops) on a sixty-day RT schedule.

Here she left port this afternoon

bound for Norfolk and then the Canal.   Approaching sailing vessel is Ventura.

Sea Lady is a bulker that follows a very different route and rhythm, spending much more time in port, loading claw-full by claw-full of crushed cars and other ferrous  non-life.  Scroll through that link for some of the ports she’s seen in the past year.

Given the intriguing name, I’m sorry I couldn’t catch up with this less-than-one-year old box vessel, CMA CGM Samson.

And finally, over in Red Hook today it was Baltic Mercur.  Built in Germany a quarter century ago, she really does connect eastern US with the Baltic, including St. Petersburg.

All fotos taken this midday by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Following up on yesterday’s post about warping tugs.  Paul located and sent along these links showing almost century-old fotos of warping tug Alligator in good repair.  Click here and here.  Paul . . . again, many thanks.

Two years ago, I learned about these tugs while north of the border here.   Many thanks to Paul Fehling for today’s fotos of alligator tug remains.  He took the fotos while canoeing recently in western Maine.    My reference book called Alligators of the North makes me believe these could be this could be what’s left of a 1923 warping tug called Alligator shipped from Simcoe Ontario to Portland Maine.

These ruins raise questions like . . .  are there fotos of Alligator intact and

how did it ship from Lake Erie to here?

When was it last operational?

It lies downstream from Umbagog Lake near the New Hampshire/Maine border, not far from the town of Errol, where I haven’t been in over 20 years.

Many thanks to Paul Fehling.

For some coastal Maine delights, click here for Sally W reports from Camden.

Comet, Eva Leigh Cutler, Manhattan skyline in September 2009.

Ditto . . . . September 11, 2012.

Buildings are replaced,

trade flourishes,

channels are carved deeper,

the open is

closed up,

precautions

are exercised, but

we remember.  Many thanks for the foto below to Capt Jack Joffe, Liberty V of the National Parks Service in the sixth boro.

We heal although scars at times recall pain.

Unrelated:   An NYTimes story about a revival in moving raw product to steel mills on inland waterways.

Three vessels at the roundup this year appeared there for the first time .  . well sort of.   The red one, aka Augie, was in fact there for the first time.  The other . . . on the left, Frances, has been there before but with very different appearance.

Here’s a closeup of Augie, who first made a show here and here.

The surprise newcomer at the roundup this year was Wendy B, but with a bit of search, I’ve found this blog about here journey from Toronto to DC seven years ago, by the previous owners.

Click here for the specs at the time of her last sale.  Talking with the owners, I learned she was delayed in the sixth boro–on her recent northward passage–by the 4th of July 2012  fireworks.  Does anyone recall seeing her in town?  Here are my fotos of the spectacular illuminations that day.

Here’s Augie, nestled up to Cornell, in current colors.

When I saw Frances this weekend, I first assumed I was looking at Margot, currently working on Lake Ontario.

Here’s how Frances looked two years ago.

I’m enthusiastic to see Frances (1957) covered in new paint that just exudes vitality.  Soon she’ll be working like Margot, her one-year-younger sister.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but thanks to Barbara for sending this link along:  South Street Seaport in the news.

Canals are like bridges . . . points of connections, although “bridge” gets used much more as the verb for “crossing the otherwise uncrossable.”  As with bridges, canals create clusters . . . centers of

communication and cooperation.

Archways can easily be created.

Within canals you find vessels passing through with connections from many different places, like White Horse and

Telluride?!!

and

Norfolk by way of Montreal . . .

and Florida . . . nearing its highest point of navigation…

Vermont, and

and Albany by way of Owen Sound, Halifax, and the Potomac . . .

Roundup tales to be continued . . . .  Will Van Dorp’s fotos.

Here are a, b, c, and d from two years ago.  As I write this, the Roundup has not yet finished.  What’s left is the fireworks extraordinaire, the grand finale.  But the Roundup begins with a parade up from Albany northward.  On the west side of the river is I-787, and by parading along the Interstate at homeward rush hour Friday night, like a circus parade promenading past the farms, mills and markets of yore, this curious group of vessels is designed to convince weekend-planning commuters to hang out at the Waterford waterfront parts of Saturday and Sunday.

The Rensselaer side of the river (or maybe this is North Greenbush) looks fairly wild in places . . .  with vestiges of industry,

but Troy is proud of its present and

and past.

Once through the Federal lock,

The flotilla makes its way to Waterford.  more on that the next few days.

Amen .  . . thanks to the sponsors!!  And I enjoyed meeting so many new people.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Before dawn the day of the race, daily port activities carried on:  Atlantic Niyala awaited load shift in Red Hook.

Celebrity Summit arrived from sea for some port time here assisted by  Kimberly Turecamo (?).

Scott Turecamo awaited some rehab

at Caddell’s.

As passengers debarked to starboard, equipment received attention to port.  I’m not sure what all is happening over on the port side here.

Up at the Manhattan passenger terminal Veendam received Tuckahoe  attention to port as well as passengers transferred from ship to island.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who heads for the Roundup tomorrow.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Seth Tane American Painting

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