You are currently browsing the monthly archive for August 2012.

The days to use the westside pedestrian/cyclist lane of the Bayonne Bridge are winding down . .  if plans are to be believed.  And then, in 2014 or so when the work is completed, the walk/cycle lane will reside on the east side.

Note the bulb of a vessel appearing between the support members.  I’m thinking that given the use of “flags of convenience” in this industry, this foto might make a suitable flag for an aquatic micronation like Republic of New Atlantis or Oceania.

Behold a possible 4892-teu vessel headed straight for the narrow channel at Mariners Harbor.

Fortunately, that trajectory will be modified by Amy C McAllister.  But I wonder, what would happen if that bow tug should suddenly lose power.

That gray console on the portside bridge wing, can I cal that a bridge wing helm station?

Note the folded forward mast.  Vessel is APL Oman.  Any guesses where she was built?  A clue is that builder is listed as a company named Daewoo.

Bruce A. McAllister acts as the starboard stern thruster.

She’s five days out of the Panama Canal. Here’s APL’s itinerary for the past two months:

2012 August 19th, 13:00:31 UTC New York
2012 August 14th, 04:00:44 UTC Balboa
2012 July 29th, 00:00:08 UTC Pusan
2012 July 27th, 08:30:05 UTC Yang Shan
2012 July 25th, 00:30:49 UTC Hongkong
2012 July 24th, 11:00:17 UTC Yan Tian
2012 July 21st, 22:00:58 UTC Yan Tian
2012 July 21st, 22:00:40 UTC Hongkong
2012 July 19th, 22:30:28 UTC Kaohsiung
2012 June 18th, 08:00:09 UTC Norfolk

The rotation is progressing well.

It seems the starboard bridge wing helm station is covered,  so portside to the dock?

Color-coded overalls keep hierarchy pronounced?

While I’m up on my vantage point overlooking Newark Bay, I have a chance to see what else is around.  From roughly far left to near right, it’s upper blue wheelhouse of DonJon boat, Bebedouro!!, an unidentified ferry, and Cashman’s drillboat Kraken.

All fotos taken today by Will Van Dorp, whose computers are happier than they were yesterday.

And the place of construction for APL Oman . .. Daewoo Mangalia in Romania!!

Yesterday and today’s Franklin.

Tomorrow’s Franklin . . .


B. Franklin Reinauer, that is.

Dawn foto compliments of Rod Smith, who covers Narragansett Bay.

Top foto by Will Van Dorp, whose computers are in rebellion.

First foto comes thanks to William Hyman, who took it eight days ago.  Resolute waits along the dock in MOTBY for its next assist.  In the background is a lesser-known 9/11 monument, a Tsereteli statue given to the US as an official gift of the Russian government only six years ago. Putin himself came here for the dedication.   Resolute is six times older than the monument, and when it was launched, no doubt no one would have imagined a Russian-donated statue would stand anywhere in NYC.

Ireland dates from 1940;  she first appeared on this blog only five months ago here.

No vessel makes more noise as it passes as OSG Vision.  And if you don’t know her power in “equines,” check here.  I guess that partially explains the throbbing, only partly since President Polk is rated at 57,000! 

Amy Moran (1973, 3000 hp) assists OSG Vision and OSG 350 through the Kills.

Amy C McAllister (1975) follows McAllister Sisters (1977) to the next assist.

Bruce A. McAllister (1974) here assists Baltic Sea I (2003) rotate and then head outbound.

A few seconds earlier, McAllister Sisters used noticeable force to push Baltic‘s stern around.

There was once a Baltic Sea that belonged to the same fleet as Beaufort Sea (1971), but that other Baltic now works out of Lagos, Nigeria.  I’ve written the new owners to ask for fotos, but  . . . so far, in vain.

Bering Sea (1975) and Jane A. Bouchard (2003) spend some time at the fuel dock.

No tug appears on this foto, but some of you just know which tug is mated to RTC 135.  Cruise ship, I believe, is Explorer of the Seas.   Answer about the tug follows.

Gelberman (1980)  may look like a tug, but USACE call it a “debris collecting vessel.”  More info on her can be found in this post from three and a half years ago.

Thanks to William Hyman for that first foto;  all others by Will Van Dorp.   And the tug mated to RTC 135 is Nicole Leigh Reinauer.

Pier 25 is unmistakeable on the Hudson side of lower Manhattan.  I posted fotos of Lilac moving to Pier 25 aka “historic ships pier” back a year and some months ago.   On some of those fotos, you can see bowsprite catching lines from the Miller’s Launch crew assisting Lilac’s arrival.  Bowsprite also goes by the name “Christina Sun,” who is half of the art show proclaimed on the dockside sign below.

Here she was hanging the show last weekend.  If you’ve looked at her site much, you’d have seen her rendering of RB 45614 (below) on her artblog here.

The other half of the art show (up til the end of August!!) is Frank Hanavan.    I’ve painted with Frank, like here on this bowsprit at least six years ago, and posted on this blog here back in 2007.  This foto and the next by Maggie Flanagan.

But besides painting in places that require a harness, Frank also paints

en plein air with an easel. In fact, this piece, part of his show, he did ON Pier 25 back in May when Picton Castle docked there for a few days.  Click on that link  (scroll through) and you’ll

see what message was printed on the square sail on the foremast.  Frank’s art is all contained in one room on Lilac, but

bowsprite’s 38 prints are spread through Lilac, leading the observer on a treasure hunt . . .  even through the engine room!

But I can’t look at a piece like this and NOT remember the delightful story on her blog about excavator dredge J. P. Boisseau with remembering the whale that appeared in Lower NY Bay, no doubt coming to check who was scratching the harbor’s bottom . . . and why.

Lilac is a unique vessel open to the public Mondays, Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays.  Hours are here.  In fact, this Saturday evening, besides art, you can also see the world premiere of a documentary about MV Liemba, the nearly century old steam ferry (I believe very recently dieselized but still running) on Lake Tangayika.  For a press release about the film from Lilac Museum director, Mary Habstritt, click here.

Historic ships, art, film, music, drinks, warm summer evening on the Hudson in Lower Manhattan . .  . . . .  see you there!!  Bring some $$ too and take home some beautiful marine art for your walls.

Here’s Frank’s official site.   And here’s Christina’s online “sketchbook.”

Unrelated:  Here’s a 13-minute interview I did with John Doswell of Working Harbor Committee (WHC) back in 2010.  I’d never heard it until today.  And remember  . . . here’s info on the WHC-sponsored 20th annual tugboat race coming up in NYC’s sixth boro in less than three weeks!!

. . .   and  on a rainy day.  Here was 1 in this.

Note the crewman entering or departing President Polk by the access doorway.  Doubleclick enlarges.  Can you name two institutions that opened while Polk, 11th,  was president?

As Larvik slides over to its berth, the linemen prepare to run the lines to the bollards.

Lateral sliding power gets provided by McAllister Sisters and Resolute.

Barbara is not forgotten.

Sorry . . . I couldn’t resist.

Amy Moran reminds me . . . where is Cape Cod these days?

Baltic Sea I rotates off the dock and heads for sea.

Bruce A. McAllister delivers the pilot.

On its way to assist in Baltic Sea I departure, McAllister Sisters passes Maersk Utah.

Answer to the question on Polk,  the president, was incumbent for the creation of the US Naval Academy and the Smithsonian.   More info on him here.

All fotos taken today by Will Van Dorp.

In Utah a few weeks ago, I saw a deer, recently dead . . . judging by the redness of some remaining tissue, but scavengers like ravens and coyotes had mostly picked clean its intact ribcage, which itself would soon be hauled away in sections by the larger beasts.  Binghamton, the 1905 ferry, is dead.

Riverwater ravens and coyotes have been picking her clean but ever so slowly. I took the next three fotos last October, 2011.

Here’s a post I did with interior shots, including this

elegant staircase leading up to the bar.

Fast forward 10 months:  Sally Seymour took these fotos late last week as they traveled downriver in the rain.

The river has been scavenging, but

ever so slowly, as if to say . . . I know some of this beauty could be saved but  it

just “aint gonna happen.”

If one option is letting the vessel disintegrate and travel downriver piecemeal, then I hope a huge machine gets in here and devours it in a day BUT invites me in to take fotos of each bite.

But oh . . .  that bar!!

Fotos 5, 6, and 7 by Sally Seymour.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  And thanks to Walter Stevens for sending this background article along . .  published early December 2011.

Here was the first post by this title.  I’ve been back for a few days, but it’s been hard to transition from my jaunt in Utah areas of wilderness back to the densely settled areas in and around the sixth boro of NYC.  I didn’t take the foto below of Binghamton, but her time is clearly running out.  If you notice human/mechanical demolition (as opposed to destruction by natural erosion . . . as in the desert) happening, please get in touch or  send me fotos? This was taken Friday during the rain by Allan and Sally, whose sweet vessel you’ll see later.   I did three posts early October 2011 about Binghamton, then ravaged by Hurricane Irene.

I caught this foto of Miller Boys yesterday when it seemed the winds were blowing more rain in.

Ellen McAllister was moving this “unmarked” McAllister tug (anyone recognize it?) around the yard. Info follows, thanks to Birk Thomas.  That’s Cashman’s Lynx in the background.

Also in Mariner’s Harbor, it’s Mark McAllister, not typically a sixth boro boat.

And slightly west, lined up from left to right are Barents Sea, Yankee, NaHoku, and Taurus.

Potomac stands off with Lower Manhattan in the background after an assist.

Over in North Cove, expedition yacht Copasetic costs more than twice any of the tugs appearing in this post; that bow is inspired by much larger ships.

And finally, my host vessel for a jaunt and great conversation . . .   the Lord Nelson Victory tug Sally W, operated by

Allan and Sally, who’ve kept this blog during their recent jaunt up to Ottawa.  By the way, has anyone seen Chase, the long distance padleboarder?

Binghamton fotos by Sally.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

In case you were not able (like me) to identify the tug alongside Ellen McAllister, it’s none other than Winslow C. Kelsey.

Here was 19.

From  Towingline.com, a foto I’ve long sought:  NYC prison barge Resolution leaving the sixth boro (East River portion) on Giant 4 in 1997, assisted by ITC Towage tug Suhaili. She traveled to the UK, where she became HM Prison Weare.  It seems that less than a decade later, her use as a prison was discontinued, although I’m not sure the vessel has been scrapped.   Credit for the foto goes to Hans van der Ster and to Smit.    Currently the sixth boro is home to prison vessel Vernon C. Bain.

The next fotos–updates on T-ATF 172 Apache come compliments of Mark Helmkamp, Ocean Tug & Salvage Ship Class Manager for the Military Sealift Command.  The foto below shows the handoff of the decommissioned sub USS Philadelphia from Apache to Sioux at the former Rodman Naval Station.

Note the sub on the wire on the Pacific side of the ride.

The next two fotos show Apache towing the sub through the Miraflores Locks.   It’s rainy season at the Canal.  Many thanks to Dianne Woods-Olvera Cavness for these fotos.

x

And finally, from Cape Town and thanks to Colin Syndercombe, a followup on Mighty Servant . . .  here carrying an unidentified oil rig.

And if I’ve whetted your appetite for workboats hither and yon, check out what Jed located in the BVI here.

This compilation from Will Van Dorp, who’s back in the sixth boro after a family gallivant.  For fotos, see the top 100 fotos on the Flickr show along the left margin.

A year and a half ago, I wrote about iceboating on what I called “Lake Shangri-la . . .”   The foto below appears to be a smooth frozen lake . . . although the white-hatted cowboy standing in the middle of the road might be puzzling.

And those do look like icefishing diehards with

novel ice shanties on wheels.

Drift ice on a frozen high plateau lake?

Close ups of the ice chunks?

Uh . .  guy walking on water?

Except it’s almost 100 degrees out . . . and just down the road–I-80–is GSLSP  aka

Great Salt Lake State Park, and one selkie who takes briny deep to extremes.   Ever wonder why the word Bonneville is used in reference to places out here?  Answer follows.

And that outrigger seems to float pretty high in the water.

More on this place–as salty as the stuff in your kitchen–soon.  All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

I wonder if anyone has ever tried sails on craft with runners for a Bonneville time trial . . .   And “Bonnevile” was the name given to places here by Grove K. Gilbert for Benjamin Bonneville, French-born explorer of the West.  If you read only one link in this post, read his biography here.    I enjoyed his Washington Irving/NYC connection.

So I was an especially gullible kid who wished in vain that my parents would let me buy some sea monkeys that I saw advertised in Popular Mechanics.  Never happened.    Hold that thought.

Below is a foto of the Great Salt Lake.  And before I came here, I’d heard that it stunk and held

no life.  But how

then was it also a major bird migration path. 

Doubleclick on this foto and see all the birds.  And yes the water near shore was black with flies and other insects that–unlike gnats–disperse when you approach.  All this brings up this

display outside Dave’s Gonzo Kayak rental on Antelope Island. To my amazement, I learned that Great Salt Lake has a fishery and this is an older, obsolete vessel used in the harvesting of brine shimp . . .

aka sea-monkeys!!  Click here for a foto of a more up-to-date vessel, the likes of which I’d love to see.

Click here for a feature from High Country News on the fishery, here for the site of the GSL Brine Shrimp Cooperative, and here for some starter economics on the industry.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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