A week ago, I posted this foto (last one scrolling through) and asked where it was taken.   Answer is Brazil.  And the relationship to this foto is what?  Buchanan 12 was built 1972 in Louisiana, but the black ship in the foreground handmade with woods such as olanje, jaquera, pau oleo . . .

was built in Brasil about 50 miles southwest of Salvador.  It’s a replica of Niña as seen from  . ..  Pinta.  Both hurried through Manhattan earlier this week on their way here in Newburgh until this Sunday.

Next  stop is then Rochester, NY (click for schedule)  . . . which means unstepping the masts and traversing the Erie Canal via Oswego.  From there it’s the Great Lakes and ultimately the Mississippi.

Pinta was launched in 2005 from the same shipyard in Brasil, about 1/3 larger to accommodate school groups.  Here I quote from the site:  both vessels were built by the Assis de Santana family, who have built wooden vessels there for eight generations using 15th century “Mediterranean Whole Moulding [techniques] with mechanically generated geometric progressions known as graminhos.  Shipwrights were using traditional tools, such as axes, adzes, hand saws and chisels, as well as utilizing traditional construction methods; and finally, the tropical forests of Bahia provided a source for the various naturally-shaped timbers necessary to build a large wooden ship. ”  This makes me think of Onrust upriver.

Surely  record of this visit

is being created by local artists.

This tender is said to have been built by an Assis de Santana family member, 14 years old at the time.

The catalyst for this project, John Patrick Sarsfield, has a tragic ending.

A few weeks ago Bounty was up this way.  From the dock in Newburgh looking south as Buchanan 12 pushes her hundreds of truckloads of crushed stone, you can see Bannermans Castle, marking the northern end of the Hudson Highlands.  Here is another “ghosts” post I did about Bannermans about five years ago.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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