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Late first snow this season unless you count the few flurries over the sixth boro last October, but flakes did obscure vision this morning.   Of course, Cheyenne is always recognizeable and busy, but Arabian Sea (in green) I had to guess at.

Laurie Ann Reinauer  . . . well, I could read the name on her derriere.

But Barbara McAllister I had to guess at.  (Harold corrects me . . .it’s Amy C. McAllister.  Thanks, Harold.) Snow flakes just blocked out the name.

Franklin . . . I know the profile AND can read the name even with my cokebottle glasses.

But I was looking for a good 10 minutes at this right in front of me and did not even SEE it.  No, not Sanko Blossom, but that new feature beyond her . . . that light colored structure obscured

now and again by a squall.  It wasn’t there a few days ago.

It’s good for my self-confidence that I saw the tower yesterday also, and got fotos of the 260′ tower then, over beyond Hanjin Albany.   Otherwise I might have suspected it came with the storm.   The blades weren’t turning, though, in spite of the wind, since it won’t go operational for a month or so yet. 

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s already wondering if Bayonne can be convinced to put bright colorful lights on the tower next December.

Some folks do spring cleaning;  I do winter culling.  And have been doing a lot of it, including in my foto library.  Considering the library as a whole, it’s constantly in flux . . . stuff out; better stuff-I hope–in.  Many quotes say this;  my favorite version is “you cannot step into the same river twice.”

Same is true of a harbor; what vessels inhabited it when I first paid attention are no longer here, at least not in the same way.  Take Odin, about which I’ve heard a lot of chatter this week.  Great name.  Perfect candidate for an award for eccentricity, but I smiled every time I saw Odin.   I never saw the closest vessel to her in DNA, the ill-fated Red Wing.  You can tell this is the older Odin because the house rests on a hydraulic ram.

 Here her house has front legs.

Here’s Odin, house down, bunkering a Princess vessel.

Dean Reinauer has also left the sixth boro; she traveled out on the back of Blue Marlin last summer.  Where she is today, I’m SURE she’ll see no snowfall like this, taken a few years back over by Howland Hook.

Ditto Great Gull . . . down in Venezuela . . . no snow.  I recall fondly how excited I was when I first saw Great Gull, turns out built by the same folks who built barges for Europe as part of the Marshall Plan.

And the ORANGE June K.  I know she’s still around as Sarah Ann.  But that original color was almost institutional, almost spring time.

And then there’s Rosemary McAllister, now working on lease down south without her last name and with an all-white stack.    Her christening was a seminal bowsprite/tugster collaboration.

She worked in the harbor for too short a spell, from my POV, before migrating to Houston, but what do I know about the economics.

Scott C is now Weddell Sea.  Dorothy Elizabeth (star  . . . well, an extra . . .  of Carlito’s Way) has now been scrapped.

Finally, there’s Kristin . . . , once with a telescoping house like Odin, now scrapped.

I have others, but it’s amazing how much changes in five years of  observing the harbor.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Given my vintage, the sound that personifies change for me is this song by Jefferson Airplane.  

First, you will notice a new icon “button” on the left.  It’s a harborcam for Giglio port with live feed showing salvage efforts.

The last time subs appeared on this blog they were antiques, John P. Holland’s prototypes.  The monochromatic tube below encircled by the unmistakeable yellow/orange Edison Chouest tugs 2, 3, and 4 is as far removed from Holland’s vessel as can be.   The “tube” is SSBN 734 USS Tennessee, returning from sea.  I can imagine the crew will be very happy to exit vessel and get reaquainted with the rythyms of day and night.    By the way, the Edison Chouest tugs here technically double as pilot boats.

Surfaced SSBNs returning from or bound to sea all tend to look alike. 

These fotos were taken in the vicinity of Kings Bay, GA along the St. Mary’s River.   They come compliments of

Capt. John E. Dupee, a Kings Bay pilot, the tallest person on the “sail” below,  and frequent commenter on this blog. Last summer in northern Florida I had the pleasure of meeting  John aka JED, who used to work for K-Sea outa New York. 

Many thanks, JED.

Click here to see fotos from the weekend in 2008 that the sixth boro had TWO subs visit.

UPDATE:  If you want to see in real time developments from the waterfront in Giglio, click here and here for two webcams Giglio Porto Panoramica, each from a different perspective.   Thanks to David Hindin for these links.  David sent these fotos along last year from San Francisco.

Less than a half hour after waking up this morning, drinking coffee, reading the paper and wanting to find out who “James H. Thompson” and “Pridi Banomyong”  were, I encountered this page.  Countless times today I met it again.  I support wikipedia’s opposition to SOPA and PIPA and urge you to tell your congressfolk too.   Or at least find out about the issue.

But of course, I’m not darkening this blog.  Especially when I can share such colorful fotos of Sand Master yesterday before the rain.

Sand Master looks a lot like Greenland Sea and Na’Hoku, but  . . .  surprise, each comes from a different shipyard although all at one time belong to Otto Candies.

Sand Master was built by Swift Ships in Pass Christian, MS in 1983.

Amboy Aggregates uses Sand Master in their sand mining activties, and as such, she spends most of its time off Sandy Hook, a presence on AIS but not so commonly seen.

John P. Brown is always a delight to see, as

is Thomas J. and yesterday

was no exception.  It was worth my while to get my feet wet taking this foto.

As I said yeasterday, I got the sense that the flag raising on Mount Hope was a signal for all manner of activity to commence.   Capt. Fred Bouchard moved into the notch of B. No. 275 and  Barbara McAllister (ex-Bouchard Boys) (see the upper wheelhouse on the far side) added her 4000 hp to

Capt. Fred‘s 5750 . . . and the waters started to churn.

Meanwhile, what or who can make the slack waters of the KVK rise up like this?

Barbara E. . . . with her 6140 hp.

Some minutes later, Barbara E. and Capt. Fred Bouchard round the bend to exit the KVK.   Interesting guy, the original Cap. Fred.

All fotos yesterday by Will Van Dorp during less than a one-hour party.

Please do something about SOPA and PIPA.

Unrelated:  Click here for the “hugest” set of links to cruise vessels that I’ve ever soon.  I’m lamenting the loss of life, but I’m not speculating about what transpired off Giglio.  But for an eerie foto of the Costa Concordia appearing to  “float in clouds,”  click here.  Here’s a portentious video from the vessel’s launch.

Between 0800 and 0900 this morning, sunshine poured down onto the KVK, and deepened all the colors.  Sand Master (more of these fotos tomorrow) was positively radiant while waiting–it seemed– for something to happen before it can get into the fuel dock.

Then I saw the “something” as Mount Hope began to inch stern first into the stream.   Laura K. Moran surged from port

to starboard to assist in the rotation, her power and precision captivating me.  But then, way atop the superstructure, movement

caught my attention, a bit of ceremony I’ve never noticed before.  A crewman made the flag fast to the halyard and

ran it up, as if to say . . .  we

are now open for business.  Here  is some of the traffic:  Mount Hope outbound passes APL Japan inbound.

OOCL Nagoya seemed to try to get up on plane, and

in doing so . . .  tailed by Barbara McAllister, deftly carved an arc between the bank and an incoming Affinity on the hip of  Marion Moran.

I then went to my appointment on the land side of Richmond Terrace, noticing from indoors two Ital container vessels (Moderna and another) passed.   Before noon, as I headed back home, I noticed that Oyster Creek with the bunker barge was refueling  Shorthorn Express  north of the VZ Bridge as

(this foto thanks to John Watson) Queen Elizabeth headed into port.  Draw what conclusion you will from the juxtaposition of these last two vessels.

Thanks to John for the foto.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who imagines that without that flag-raising, none of this traffic would have happened.

By noon, bright sunshine had turned to overcast gray and then drizzle.  No snow, though.

Know the city?

Know this city?  The clue lies in WTGB number, 107 v. 105.  And in the nearer, smaller vessel below.

It’s New York and Detroit, two capitals of different enterprises.  Click here for more Detroit police boats.

Both cities have an Ambassador Bridge, although

the one in New York spends less than 24 hours in port whenever she appears.  Bunkering there thanks to Sassafras.

Here’s Detroit’s Ambassador Bridge, Canadian tug John Spence heading southbound in that direction.

But these days, Detroit has some New York doesn’t . .  snow.  After a slight dusting in October that was gone the next day, the sixth boro has sen no snow!  Of course, that could all change very quickly, and to say no snow does NOT mean warm, calm weather.   Snow was blowing so hard across the Detroit River this weekend that this ore carrier couldn’t be identified.  (It’s Lee A. Tregurtha, Baltimore-built.  Thanks Ken.)

Great Republic could.

This is the first year the 31-year-old vessel has operated under that name, ex-American Republic.

CSL Niagara is a fleetmate cousin of the frequent visitor to the sixth boro, Alice Oldendorff.  Note the self-unloading gear.  I’ve gotten over my affection for Alice.

Here are more American lakers, Adam E. Cornelius and

Roger Bough Blough.   Enjoy these additional fotos of Roger Blough, possibly now laid-up for the winter.

Here’s a Baltimore-built classic  Michipicoten.

Many thanks to Ken Bailey for these Detroit fotos;  Will Van Dorp took the sixth boro ones.

More news from Detroit, the owner of the Ambassador Bridge has been sent to jail.  Info here.

Dickens’ Tale of Two Cities has one of the most memorable opening lines in English literature.  Know it?  

I introduced the term aframax here four and a half years ago.  Relative to the sixth boro and the Kills, it means BIG, although by no means big by global standards.  At 113,043 DWT, Southern Spirit is a minor vessel in relation to the now scrapped Knock Nevis (564,763 DWT) or also-scrapped Batillus (553,662 DWT).

No matter, in the frigid 21-degree morning today, finger almost too cold to trigger the shutter, I felt warmed to see her glide in, with Gramma Lee T. Moran assisting.  Doubleclick enlarges.

In my observation, not many vessels navigate with KVK with a 5100-hp vector like Gramma Lee at the ready like this.  Here’s a 2002 article about the background and training of the first captain of Gramma Lee.

Spotting the assist was Catherine Turecamo, astern of Gramma Lee.

On a cold winter day, this is what the promise of heat looks like.  Can anyone help me figure out where this cargo–if it be crude–exited the earth?

As to promise of heat, if I were crew on watch, I’d be hoping for hot soup for lunch.

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a post I did five years ago with info on suezmax and capesize vessels and a foto of a very young tugster.

Unrelated:  For a mariner’s reaction to the Costa Concordia collision with Isola del Giglio, read Hawsepiper Paul here. Another mariner, Peter Boucher of Nautical Log, weighs in here.  I had the pleasure of meeting Peter last summer in Florida.

I’d planned something different for today, but then my inbox started to fill.  And it makes me happy to feel a community building here.  So . . . thanks all for reading and sending fotos and links.  I wanted to go out taking fotos, but a pile of tasks told me to stay home.

First, Ann O’Nymous sent me a link to Tugboat Tales, a fabulous documentary made by the late Bart Lawson back in 1991.  This first-rate documentary is divided into parts one, two, and three.   A click gets you to youtube.

Next, harbor photographer extraordinaire John Watson went to check progress on Ambrose, and discovered the drydock had been floated out and reoriented 180 degrees, with the lightship on board.  That would have been a sight to behold.

  Now here’s the bow . .  as seen from shore.   Given the wind, the blue belly over the mushroom anchor is clearly a blue tarp.

Next, from Allen Baker, this foto of a lightship undergoing restoration two hundred miles . . . downeast . . . well, in Boston.   It’s LV-112, which last appeared in this blog almost two years ago.  That info back in 2010 was passed along by Matt of Soundbounder.  Check this link (Thanks to Rick) for many more fotos of LV-112.

As I said, I stayed inside this morning, chomping at the bit because Orange Star was headed out.  Had I realized that her sister vessel was coming in and that they’d cross not far from the Narrows, I would have “busted out.”  Nothing could have kept me inside.  Then, I got an email from bowsprite informing me that Orange Babe Wave had come into port, and I was beside myself.  At which point . . . .

I got an email from John Skelson, with attached fotos of Orange Wave!!!  If you’re new to this blog, I’m a self-professed orangejuiceaholic.  Here, thanks to A. Steven Toby is a link to the technology of these juice ships.

And since this post has become a gallery of other people’s fotos, here’s another from Allen Baker.  A little self-disclosure here:  I moved to the Boston area in the mid-1980s.  One day in 1986, I was walking near the Science Museum and saw two very tired tugboats there, Luna and Venus.  The sad sight drew me in.  To see these beauties in such an utter state of disintegration broke my heart.  I thought both were doomed.  Venus was clawed into matchsticks in 1995, and Luna very narrowly escaped the same fate.  Read the much nuanced story here.   Luna dates from 1930, the same year as W. O. Decker.  I hope to see Luna again soon;  too bad I didn’t carry a camera around back in 1986.

And Decker brings the post to South Street Seaport, which I’m thrilled isexperiencing early springtime, frigid temperatures notwithstanding.  Also, if you’ve been in NYC recently, you know it’s been a snowless winter so far;  this foto was taken last year.  I’ve always know the vessel below as Helen McAllister, but now I’m embarrassed to note that she’s also the ex-Admiral Dewey and Georgetown.  I’d never realized that.  Further, she came off the ways into the KVK in 1900, built at the same yard that produced Kristin Poling!    And this raises two questions:  is Helen McAllister that last power vessel of that yard  still extant?  And, does anyone know of fotos of Helen McAllister that show her working during OpSail 1992.  Which raises the question . . . am I the only one NOT hearing talk of planning for OpSail 2012 New York?

Both Ambrose and Admiral Dewey/Georgetown/Helen McAllister are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

It’s cold outside and tomorrow should be colder, so you could click on every link above  and drink some hot tea.  Did I complete many of my tasks today?  No, but I had a ball with these fotos.  Watching all three parts of Tug Tales will take about a half hour, but it is well worth the time.

Thanks to Ann, John, Allen, bowsprite, Steven, and John for fotos and info.

Finally, here are two other worthwhile places to check while emptying that pot of tea:  Oil-Electric on “marine railroads” and a treasure trove of fotos from the National Maritime Museum on Flickr.

This “random” title just serves to catch me up, post a few fotos that haven’t worked into any other posts.

This is my first sighting of Atlantic Salvor, 1976, frequently on this blog. With new paint and who knows what else, she’s just back in the sixth boro from a trip to Lake Erie.  She spent Christmas somewhere on the St. Lawrence downstream from Montreal.  Now that was a trip I coveted a berth on.

Catherine Turecamo and James Turecamo, (1972, 1969, respectively) in midafternoon twilight, waiting to escort in inbound ship outside the red 28.

Oyster Creek (2011) passing the Statue, where a new yellow sculpture has been erected?

Matthew Tibbets (1969)

Reinauer Twins, less than six months at work.   More than once, I’ve heard folks identify a unit like Twins and RTC 104 as a ship.

And here I can’t identify this, although I would have said Sea Bear.  Note the raised

steel letters on the port bow.

Diane B, Peter F. Gellatly, and Kristy Ann Reinauer.  (1980, 2008, and 1962)

And now for some fotos from the road,  Mary Bennett  (1977) in Newport News,

and Corpus Christi (2009), married to

Petrochem Supplier, with a very bright

deck lamp.    A week after I took these fotos in Wilmington, she was in New York.  And to give some idea of her range, check out this incident report from 2010.

Margaret McAllister (1966) had a similar intense light as she saw Louise Knutsen (2010)out towards sea on the Cape Fear River.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Birk took these waterside fotos the better part of a week ago.  It took me a while to figure out the “color” of the mushroom anchor at the bow.

Plastic wrap I conclude, but that could be erroneous.  Ambrose certainly is full-bodied with a low center of gravity.

For purposes of comparison, I’ve put up the next two shots I took at South Street 25 months ago.  While afloat, Ambrose‘s beamy or “jowly” hull cannot be fully appreciated.

From this NPS Maritime Heritage  Program link, I learned that Ambrose was launched in 1907 and originally wore straw colored paint–with her name in black–not the white lettering on red hull she’s sported since the 1930s.  Oh . . . the folks in the red suits around her in this shot . . . they must belong to some secret society of the Nacirema.

Many thanks to Birk Thomas for the top two fotos.

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