I last used this title over three years ago, and every day  since then, fuel has flowed through the harbor, as blood through healthy veins.  And it will keep on doing so by an impossibly wide array of vessels.  Below, yesterday afternoon the 1934-launched ship Kristin Poling pushes over 21,000 barrels of oil in the direction of the 1931-opened Bayonne Bridge.   Kristin‘s destination COULD lead it through the ice-choked waters up the Hudson, captured here less than a month back by Paul Strubeck.  Part of what the foto below says to me is the immense care and maintenance in keeping both these harbor icons in use.

Lucy Reinauer pushes the 2008-launched RTC 83 southbound on the Arthur Kill.  Lucy was launched from Jakobson’s in Oyster Bay in 1973 and since then has borne all the following names: Texaco Diesel Chief, Star Diesel Chief, Morania No 5, May McGuirl. I’d love to see a foto of her when first launched.

Lois Ann L. Moran (2009) pushes barge  Philadelphia out toward the Newark Bay portion of the sixth boro.  The destination of the fuel beyond that I can only guess at.

As an indication of changes in scale over the decades, load capacity of barge Philadelphia is 118,000 barrels, relative to Kristin Poling‘s  . . .21,000 and a bit.

Fuels moved through the harbor have a range of users:  Vane’s Doubleskin 301 moves in to fuel container vessel NYK Delphinus even before containers start moving off the ship.

Maneuvering 301 is not a Vane tug but Dann Marine’s East Coast.

All fotos in the past 48 hours by Will Van Dorp, who is convinced that millions of dollars will go to whomever figures out how to move food and retail goods through the sixth boro to the consumer as efficiently as all our fuels already are.  All fotos were taken from Arthur Kill Park in Elizabeth, NJ.