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I continue my gallivant in Seattle, seeing through eyes conditioned by time in the sixth boro aka harbor New York.  And again, mostly lists, as I’d rather be moving around than writing here.  Ferry Tacoma (of the largest ferry system in the US, third in the world) carries vehicles as well as people as it approaches the Seattle dock.  That’s the Olympic range in the background.

Those are WAGB-10 and 11 (Polar Star and Polar Sea) over in West Seattle.  I plan to get closer fotos soon.

Seattle is its own complex tapestry, but Alaska is a palpable presence here.

Island Packer does short (or not so short) sea shipping from here to the Aleutians, I believe (1943 built).

Cargill operates this grain terminal at Pier 86.  In the foreground are salmon pens.  Vessel is Genco Thunder, loading grain.  In the distance is bulker Sanmar Paragon.  I enjoyed being close enough to this pier that I could smell the grain as it flowed into the hold.

Closer up.  Check Muckleshoot and Suquamish.

Rainier, more than 50 miles away,  dominates Seattle.

At Pier 91, catcher-processor Northern Hawk emerges from transfer

of ownership.

In the Lake Washington Ship Canal, a crewman of crabber Lilli Ann–in response to my question–said they were “headed for Dutch” a bit less than a week away.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who is solely responsible for any and all errors in this info.  As a newby gallivanter here, I might conjecture here and there while  trying to get oriented in my limited sojourn.

Unrelated but wonderful, check out Herb Cold is the Sea‘s rendering of a husky-blue-eyed blogger.  Herb . . . wow!  Thank you.  And juxtaposed with Alice–darling Alice–wowwow!!  Alice dear, we are indeed blessed.

Salish Sea is an inclusive term like the sixth boro, where on day 1, I’ve walked nearly a dozen miles.  Special thanks to Meryll and Tom, and their newly launched Coot, sporting colors inspired by W. O. Decker.  New Yorkers . . . we have much to learn on waterfront coexistence from Seattle.

Just a listing for now:  Andrew Foss (1982, 4000 hp) over by the stern of Katie Ann and Pier 90.  Thea Foss, founder of this company,   . . .   now there’s a story of a determined mail-order bride, the original Tugboat Annie.

Alaska Titan moors in the Ship Canal in Ballard.

Pacific Star, wearing Foss colors, docks right across the Canal from Titan.

K-Sea’s footprint is just to the west is marked by  Pacific Pride and Sirius.

Out on Lake Washington, it’s Sea Prince pushing a spud barge.

And Lake Union, just in from the Ship Canal, has lots of houseboats and tugboats converted into yachts, like Owl.

Or maybe in the process of being converted, like Pathfinder.

Lake Union is home to Lake Union Drydock Company, where  Cape Flattery waits and Crowley’s Wisconsin-built Coastal Reliance (2003, 9280 hp) is high and dry.

More boats along the Lake include Triton and

Newt.  I’m curious about this name for a tug:  nature or Shakespeare?

Final shots for now . . . air harbor?

Check out these flying boats at Kenmore on the north end of Lake Washington.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, now too eager to see more of the Salish Sea to further research any of these fotos.  Research . . .  that’s for rainy, cold, stormy weather . . . not today.

Special thanks again to Meryll and Tom.

Unrelated . . .  check out GMG Joey’s homie float and Moveable Bridge Brian’s report on the 234th 7/4 in Gloucester!

To see a recap of the North River fireworks, click here, and for Queens/Bronx/East River fireworks foto’d by Mitch, click here.  In that foto, you can see three barges, each accompanied by a tug.  Anyone know which ones?   I mostly heard fireworks in what sounded like a north woods war, which must have chased all the fish into the deepest holes in the lakes.

On the way up, I sailed with Jeff Anzevino on Tide Rider and caught this view of NYS Marine Highway‘s  Margot‘s wake just after we had

circumnavigated this nameless

and peerless 1948 Chris Craft, which seemed to serve as waterside chase

crew for this hot air balloon, one of a half dozen launching from Poughkeepsie.

Later we headed to Portsmouth, where we talked to Bob Hassold (facing camera).  Interested in his 1966 tug (ex-Matinicus)?  It’s for sale.  See this article.  Bob runs a tugboat paraphernalia shop on the Portsmouth waterfront, where I found Thomas R. Flagg’s book New York Harbor Railroads in Color (a treasure for anyone interested in a “pre-truck intensive” when short-sea-shipping and cross-harbor shipping was the rule!) for less than Amazon’s price.    If you don’t know this book and are interested in the sixth boro, this IS a “must-read” book.  Tug Alley . . . it’s the most intense tug-oriented shop in the East . . . if not in the world–and I was not asked or paid to say that.

I love Portsmouth, up north in general . . . .  with its lights,

boats,

sights,

blue produce and brews,

planters painted in red-white-blue,

(actually these are Hudson River bottom feeders), and

the water.  Enjoy this gratuitous, top-feeder tugster-relaxing foto.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who continues gallivanting (from Puget Sound) soon.

And happy 234th . . .  read the sentiments here.

After a half year elapsed, the Piscataqua called me back.   But before I show you two posts of new shots of Portsmouth harbor, can anyone identify this wreck over in the Sommerville Basin in Jamaica Bay, Queens?  I don’t have an answer.

The Basin is located in the right side center of the chart between Far Rockaway and Silver Hole Marsh.  Click on the chart below to make it interactive.

Now to Portsmouth, left to right: Eugenia Moran and Carly A. Turecamo (both from 1966).

OK, I couldn’t resist:  an Auburn 866 Speedster just outside the Moran yard on Ceres Street.

As seen from the waterside, Mary M. Coppedge (1975) and then the two mentioned above.

Less than a mile away is the Portsmouth Navy Yard.  Here YTB 771 Keokuk.    Off Keokuk‘s stern is

YTL 602 Cocheco (1945). I cannot identify the quite modern tug facing Cocheco.

Anyone identify the type?

San Francisco has its Alcatraz, and in the Count of Monte Cristo, Marseille had its Chateau d’If.  Portsmouth has its Naval Prison, formidable and surrounded by vicious currents.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, now in major gallivant mode.   More Portsmouth tomorrow.

If you must travel this weekend or summer, be safe.  And you might consider taking your house with you . . . either the actual house or some some of it.  You house needs to get out.  It might be tired of the same scenery all the time, or

the same neighbors, lawn,  or landscaping.

Your house walls hear you talking about the big city . . . well, it may just want to see it once.

It may have heard you talk of large elegant houses that float . . . like Norwegian Epic, and might desire to catch a momentary even blurry glimpse of such miraculous things.

Your house might seek adventure and stay out all night!  See where the wild side leads.

It might crave a sunrise in a most unimagined location.

If so, get in touch with Patty Nolan . . .  the tugboat with the figure figure.  No, she didn’t get a new bikini for this season, but who cares.  She’s one prodigious guide.

More later.  I’m away, and so may be our houses, hausmann and hausfrau.   Please be safe whatever the reason for your travel . . . be it distraction, catchup, business, work, pleasure.  See you soon.

Any resemblance to events or persons or houses is only coincidental.  If you saw something like this, it was possibly a mirage.

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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