Unrelated to stacks:  as of this moment–8 am local time sixth boro–Flinterborg is off Sandy Hook inbound for Albany to load the Dutch barges for return.  Through Narrows by 9 at this rate?

Stack logo on an independent boat like  Shenandoah reminds me of nose art on WW2-era airplanes.  I’m surprised nose art– way forward @ waterline — hasn’t emerged as a trend in tugboat painting,  given the pivotal  (yea . . . pun intended) role of noses in much tug work.


Stack art could proclaim regional pride like Buffalo does,


although the conflict between the Canal’s western terminus city and eastern gateway town needs to be resolved.


Stacks on steamers like Hestia–I’m still working on getting info together on her–eject some many particulates (count them) that anything painted here would soon be . . . coated.


Always iconoclastic Patty Nolan –“mystery tug” shown in the fifth foto down here–borrows an idea from trucks . . . with a stainless steel (?) stack.


Pleasure tugs, of which Trilogy is a paragon of style, might proclaim a family coat-of-arms, faux or genuine.


Mary H carries some sporty lines on her stack.


Empire sports the most squared off stacks I’ve ever seen.


The Chancellor demonstrates classic passenger liner–think SS United States–arrangement:  longitudinal.


Last one for now . . . Samantha Miller . . . packs her stacks as widely spaced as possible to free maximal work and supply space astern.


All fotos by Will Van Dorp.