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Second in this series, this post attempts to captures quick details on Rondout this weekend,

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venue for the latest Working on Water (WOW) festival.  Rondout, a creek I’d love to spend much more time on, enters the Hudson about 80 miles north of  the sixth boro, strictly delineated.  The word may be a corruption of “redoubt,” no doubt a reference to the geography of the high part of town relative to the Creek.

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Some vessels there this weekend included Governor Cleveland and Day Peckinpaugh, both having been featured on this blog previously.  Much more Day Peckinpaugh soon.

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Lehigh Valley Cornell and Barge 79, the peripatetic  Waterfront Museum, have also appeared here before.

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Bermudan ketch Belle Adventure reflects sunrise.

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Bushey-tug The Chancellor was there.  Check info and a lovely drawing of The Chancellor here.   More The Chancellor later in this post.

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Jessica duLong alternated between driving Gowanus Bay (ex-Linda) and talking about her new book My River Chronicles.   Listen to a podcast of an 8 September interview with Jessica here.

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Canine passenger kayaks inhabited the Creek.

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Working tugboat Patty Nolan was there;  hull was launched in Superior, WI in 1931, but I’ve been unable to determine if the bikinied figurehead figurefigure was original standard equipment.

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For some sights and sound . . .  mid-day and duck, watch this.  Benjamin Elliott, who arrives at dusk, has appeared on this blog before.  Video made from the venerable Pegasus.

All fotos and video by Will Van Dorp.  More from WOW later.

My sentiments of more than two years ago amuse me here, and “full frontal” isn’t even really.  So in connection with a project I’m considering, here’s really  fully frontally.  Let’s start with HNLMS Tromp.  Now in those twin radomes, I see teddy bear’s ears.

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BNS Lobelia is harder to read.

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Of all the vessels in the Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group 1 (SNMCMG1), the most unusual was HNoMS Rauma.  Ever-reliable Jed sends these links here and here on vessel and hull design  Although Rauma traversed the Atlantic with the rest of the group, she seems marginally seaworthy.  But what do I know?    For all the SNMCMG1 vessels, visit Bowsprite.

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Peacemaker .  . spider be-webbed?

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Crow, (1963, Brooklyn, NY!) as seen at the bulkhead in Waterford last Saturday.

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Evening Mist, (1976, Houma, LA), big square house.

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Gulf Service, 1979, Amelia, LA) taller, hourglass houses.

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And this circles us back to Tromp, here following the egg-shaped Onrust, (2009, Rotterdam Junction, NY), featured many times on this blog.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who leaves soon for Kingston for . . .

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“Kingston Waterfront on the weekend of September 19-20. From noon to 6 p.m. both days, the WOW (Working on Water) event includes a tugboat bootcamp, trolley rides, lighthouse tours, sea shanty singers and more including “wandering tug geezers” and a “Working Hudson Picture Show.” The event is funded by the Ulster County Quadricentennial Commission, NYS assemblymember Kevin Cahill, the City of Kingston Quadricentennial Committee, and the Historic Kingston Waterfront Revival (Robert Iannucci and Sonia Ewers). For more information, check out the website here [www.workingonwater.org]. Meanwhile, from noon to 7 p.m. on September 19 at Cornell Park, which is located on Wurts Street, there’s a free outdoor drum music festival. Jack Dejohnette, the famed jazz drummer who played with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, and Jerry Marotta, who has played with Peter Gabriel and the Indigo Girls, among others, are scheduled to perform”  as quoted from   the http://www.ci.kingston.ny.us/

“Working Hudson Picture Show . .. ”  OOps!  That’s me.  Gotta run.  I’ll be at the Picture Show collecting ghost stories.  If you got one, tell it to my video camera, please?

Time to reprise one of my summer meditations:  the one on line.  Countless line-handling events happen in the sixth boro.

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Crews everywhere and from every nation do it.

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The technique is generally the same . . .

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The goal is to attach to a cleat or bollard.

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Vikings do it.

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Those seeking shelter from impending storms do it.

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It has to be done safely, for the dangers with line come fast and irreversibly.  I know from almost . ..  key word . .  almost losing some fingers.  Towmasters speaks of the dangers here, aptly illustrated.

First foto thanks to Mike Lesser, last one to Elizabeth Wood, and the others . . . Will Van Dorp.

A truckable tug named Mame Faye and her tow anchor outside the current near the confluence of the Mohawk and Hudson Rivers.  Idyllic . . .  serene, sleepy upstate river banks .  . . eh?  She’ll be back.

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Here tugs Empire and Shenandoah tie up on the opposite bank of Mame Faye and along the bulkhead.

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Farther east is The Chancellor, with twin stacks arranged longitudinally.

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Still farther east inside LehighValley Barge 79, speakers like Jessica DuLong and Don Sutherland mesmerize with their tales and chronicles of the river.

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Captains Bill and Pam park their powerful machines to rest and enjoy the quiet of oars moving in and out of the fresh water.

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Rain showers come and go and no one cares.  Lined up behind Empire are Little Bitt, Gowanus Bay, Benjamin Elliott, and Margot. It’s another lazy day at the Roundup.

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What’s this on the foredeck of Bill’s Eighth Sea?  Looks like PVC, hairspray, and  . . . radishes?

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And Captain Fred has gotten involved.  This looks  . . .

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ominous, especially after he went to the supermarket for 50-calibre radishes, the most lethal kind.

aatdx2As dusk falls,  that same Captain Bill boards Mame Faye to maneuver the barge into the middle of the stream, which is now closed to traffic, for it will soon be time to

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see the scene change and

How to describe that:  part night harbor scene, rock concert, traffic jam, railroad crossing, cacophony, simulated war zone, kaleidoscope, popcorn popper, video game, confetti, aquatic bioluminescence gone wild, volcano, apocalypse .  . .   Oh, and I’ve always preferred seeing the flashes reflect in water to seeing them in air.

Now who do you suppose Mame Faye was?  Elizabeth toots Mame‘s horn here.

All fotos and video by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated . . .  the Dutch barge flotilla probably moves through the Hudson Highlands and northward today;  if you get good fotos and want to share, email me.

Bowsprite satified my hungry eyes with her epic vistas of the diverse craft in the Upper Bay Sunday.  Let me complement by directing the eyes to equally satisfying detail.  Like flags defying uniformity of color and shape flying from

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mastheads of divers tips.  Actually, the tell-tale is called a wimpel.  On the top foto, notice the Flinter house flag.

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Fugelfrij, built in 2000, already striking with its flat-black hull, enhances that with   . . . black fenders.

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Vrouwe Cornelia, 1888, has lovely carved signs.  Whoever Lady Cornelia was, she

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left her shoes on deck.  Was she the beloved, or

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despite the wooden shoes . . . the mermaid muse of the first skipper?  Either way, this reminder rides Cornelia‘s tiller through every turn.

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These three boats (far to near . . . Pieternel, Sterre, and Vrouwe Cornelia ) alone have the combined age of 362 years!

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And each tiller carries a different beast, land spirit or

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water.  This fish rides Sterre‘s rudderhead.

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Like grapes are these parrel beads, and like a fine basket the fenders on Windroos.

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And after night fell, there was the utterly delightful music man of the waters, Reinier Sijpkens, turning as many circles as

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designs on his vessel or notes in his music.  See him here on Youtube.

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More soon.  All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Remember, fotos of the trip upriver can be seen at Arjen’s  site here.  It’s also an opportunity to struggle with Dutch text.  Still more fotos are here.

And a request:  if you happen to cross paths with this flotilla the next few weeks, I’d love to see and maybe post your fotos.  Email me.

Those lucky Hudson Valley towns:  the “flat-bottoms” move upriver today after a festive send-0ff yesterday from Atlantic Basin.  Portside NewYork had published a wonderful PDF guide to Red Hook and the barges available here.

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The setting sun in Red Hook has too rarely enjoyed such beautiful surfaces to paint with low-angle light and color.

aasb1The clouds heightened the sense of ceremony as

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the barges paraded in . . . singles or

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pairs . . .  to

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the shelter of the enclosed Basin within

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of New York skyline.  (By the way . . . two fotos up following the two skutsjes into the Basin is the barquentine Peacemaker.  More on them later.)  After dark the

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music man appeared with his vessel Cecelia to

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create magic.  More fotos of this muster later.

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Thanks to all involved from this dweller of the banks around the sixth boro.  And if you live upriver in the next two weeks, enjoy!  And if you get great fotos and want me to share them here, send me an email.

Here and here are some foto links.

By the way, exactly 400 years ago today, according to Juet’s journal, the Half Moon made it up to present-day West Point.  See Henrysobsession.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

More coverage of the 2009 Tug Roundup in Waterford later, but for now some quick fotos.  Maybe the focus on flatbottoms aka platbodems in the sixth boro has influenced my perception, but bottoms were as much a thread this year as noses, last year.  Of course, tugs dominated:  near to far in this foto:  Shenandoah, Empire, Benjamin Elliott, Margot, and Cornell . . . all of which you’ve seen here before.  More on them soon.

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Grand Erie, an Erie Canal tug–yes, it is–began life as Chartiers, an Ohio River USACE dredge tender in 1951.  Get it . . . dredging . . .  bottom?

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Without the usual W. O. Decker selling rides, folks wanting to see the waterside could catch a half hour on this canalboat.  Anyone got an update on Decker?  Will it reappear next season?

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And then there is Lois McClure, a replica  of an 1862 canal schooner barge, with obvious mixed European heritage.  Tug C. L. Churchill appears off the port stern quarter.

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As tender atop McClure‘s deckhouse is this upturned birchbark canoe.

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Complementing all my thoughts about undersides and bottoms was this T-shirt, modeled here by the ubiquitous Karl, who traded a Harvey shirt for a this one from an itinerant dredger crewman.

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Until we see fotos soon, you might not believe that Stuart’s mini-tug SeaHorse has a flat bottom.  More pics soon.

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And since the bow pudding must transform this machine into a tugboat, I can add this to the pattern . . . a very flatbottomed jet-driven tug allegedly named Urger 2.  And speaking of Urger . . . .

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is it possible that a near clone–its name differing in only one letter–has arrived at the Roundup?  More soon.

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All fotos but the last one by Will Van Dorp.  And that Burger foto . . . will for now go unattributed.

Check out the Waterford Historical Society site here.

I’m praying for perfect light on Sunday afternoon when a public viewing of the barges is scheduled on Governors Island.  PortSide NewYork offers this downloadable guide to the barges, Red Hook, and its Dutch history here.  If you have a chance to get there, the details of these vessels will reward you.  For this month from an on-barge perspective, check out the blog maintained by Arjen Wapenaar, captain of Sterre, the 1887 tjalk;  although the text is in Dutch, the pics are great.

I’ve always been taken by leeboards (aka zwaarden), but I’ve developed a new interest in the rudders:  large and exuberant.  And it seems the Dutch themselves love the rudders, transforming a component that could be just functional to  Rudders with a passion for  . . . being rudders.  Notice the size the rudder (aka roer) on the 1888 tjalk Vrouwe Cornelia (Lady Cornelia).

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And the decoration, which I offer to the readers over at Neversealand.

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The rudder on Lemsteraak Sydsulver includes a boarding ladder and a flag bracket.

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The rudder on Groenevecht dwarfs the tillerman.

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And all that beautiful wood begs for paint and carving tools.

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I’d like to know the various types of wood used in these rudders, like this dark wood on Groenling (green finch).

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I’m looking forward to the viewing on Sunday not only for more rudders but also other details:  mast, rigging, houses, blocks, bowsprits, etc.  Check out the boom (giek) support on Windroos, the hoogaars.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Off to Waterford now.

This morning at dawn,  replica Half Moon, was anchored in Gravesend Bay.  Four hundred years ago, VOC Half Moon was, and worlds began to collide.  Today they continue to collide.  They don’t need to.  Empathize.

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Let’s dance to our neighbor’s drum as well as to our own.  Foto above was taken at the Salt Festival on August 29.  Thanks to Red Storm Drum & Dance Troupe for posing.

Bowsprite and I have been trying to imagine this collision, with all its casualties and boons, angst and ecstasy, steps forward and back . . . in Henry’s Obsession.

So here is most of the rest of the fleet.  Of course, Half Moon was the flagship, the raison d’etre of the event.  Following behind is Onrust, its first season teaching history.  Use the search window to find more on both.  For a creative-nonfiction account of Henry Hudson’s journey channeled across 400 years, click here.

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Tjalk Hoop en Vertrouwen (Hope and Trust, Confidence) dates from 1913!

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Check out the four rows of reef points in the sail!

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Lemsteraak LE89 dates from 2005. Partly obscured is Windroos, the hoogaars from 1925.

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Check out the crew shirts that read “Touch of Dutch.”

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Ommeswaaij is a Lemsteraak from 1995.

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First in this pack is the tjalk De Tijd zal t Leeren (Time Will Learn It), dating from 1912.

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All in all it was a lovely parade.  Standing on Pier 84 I was moved to tears, especially during the gun salute as I heard background chatter mostly in my mother tongue.  Given all the preparation that went into these festivities, I have a complaint:  the outermost portion of that pier has been incomplete for some time.  Almost finished but NOT.  That outer portion would also have been the best platform for fotos, which a lot of people recognized to be true.  Since no signs prohibited access, a few dozen folks stepped over the fence and started snapping fotos and cheering friends and relatives–yes, relatives–on the boats.  Until various authorities arrived, threatening $100 fines.  It troubled me to hear threats used against tourists who might have marginal control of English.

My question is . . . why is this decking work not complete in time to be used for such high-profile events as this.  After all, less than 300 feet away were the Mayor, the US Secretary of State, and the Crown Prince and Princess of the Netherlands?

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And when a certain boat blocked these fotografers, some of them were unhappy, especially that tall guy, arms akimbo.

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And what view was this certain boat blocking . . . you ask?  Check this out!!  And please finish the pier decking!  I’ll even volunteer to help with the installation.

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I have a request:  certain folks would like the opportunity to photograph and sketch these classic and exotic boats in all their lush detail.  There is a viewing scheduled on Governors Island on Sunday, but the time is short.  Also, might there be a back-up time if –say–it rains?  For specifics on each of the Dutch boats, click here.

Arms akimbo-guy . . . oh, that’s tugster.

All fotos except the last two by Will Van Dorp.  The last two come from Bernard Ente.  Thank you!

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