You are currently browsing the daily archive for July 23, 2009.

Q . . . quit with the serious tone for today, quirky has ushered itself in, and questions . . . I always have questions.    Oh . . . and the fifth letter in the title “c” rather than “t,” I’ve erroneously misspelled that several times  since this series began.  Right now I need the therapy of making fun of myself.

First question:  I hadn’t previously noticed the hydraulic device between the wheelhouse  and the staple (?) on Laura K.  Anyone have ideas?

aaaq1

As Eagle Atlanta headed into the Kills yesterday, I noticed someone on the portside bridgewing cleaning or mopping.

aaaaq

Never noticed someone doing that before.

aaaq3

I’m always looking for signage that, although it may make sense in some contexts, seems quirky.    When I saw this in Mystic the other week, I wondered who or what precipitous submarines might be dropping off . . . and where the nearest pick up point might be.  Well, not really.  But wouldn’t “Warning:  Steep dropoff” be more to the point?  Am I being too much of a wise-ass of late July here?

aaaq5

Ah . . . one of my favorite type of signs:  ship names.  Take your pick at World Yacht . . . ride on a princess or a temptress.  If you know me, you know which I’d choose.  And while we’re on the topic of passenger ships (for which Old Salt has coined the acronym WOWO vessels) check this comparison out here.

aaaq6

A new sailing ship has offered proverbial “three-hour tours” from Pier 17 along the East River.  Clipper City is the name.  Previously, they operated out of Baltimore;  they’re here now, but judging by the miniscule white-painted sign indicating that, I suspect they could leave town, slap on some new paint, and have a new port before the paint was dry.

aaaq7

Last foto:  a 1905 tug named Sea Lion.  I had noticed the foto on Waterlogged, a blog done by a Vancouver-based blogging friend named Tana. Let me digress from my story, though, to point you to a fascinating adventure Sea Lion was involved with 95 years ago:  the Komogata Maru incident!!!  Read it here.  Colonialism, racism, and battle on the high seas (of the harbor).

Back to Tana’s foto though:  each time I looked at the text and foto, though, I read Sea Loin.  I said it couldn’t be, looked again, read it wrong again. . . .  Oh, it’s sad what happens to has started happening to my eyes and perception, misfires between the synapses.  I have bifocals already, but although they correct quite well, more areas of vision are starting to need correction.

aaaq4

Which brings me back to medications, which I don’t use.  For now.  Thank the water gods and goddesses.  But as my processes start slowing down in the quagmire of aging, I’m vowing to laugh more.

I’ll gallivant off again tomorrow, . . . getting sea legs while pursuing sea loins, or hobgoblins.

Except for Tana’s, all fotos by Will Van Dorp.

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

My Parrotlect Flickrstream

PC290099

PC290098

PC290097

P7070075

P7070073

P7070072

0aaaaff9

0aaaaff5

More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

free web page hit counter
July 2009
M T W T F S S
« Jun   Aug »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 319 other followers