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I’ll terminate this series by identifying a zone that I’d call the “ends of the Canal.”  In other words, even though the canal has these three “ends,” what they have in common is significant enough to group them into a single zone.  At each of the ends, a flight of locks in close proximity accommodates dramatic shift in gradient.  Lock 6–not 9 as is posted to the right–is the top of the flight at the east end, bypassing

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Cohoes Falls. Fred Tug44 documents it here.  In an earlier tugster post, I do it here with the first three photos.

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The double lock in Lockport is the last and westernmost set to move westbound traffic up to the level of Lake Erie.  This level change relates to the well-known Niagara escarpment.

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The photo below was taken inside the lock 34 chamber and

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here we are west bound for Tonawanda and the Niagara River (above the falls) above lock 35.  Here’s Fred’s take on this end of the canal.

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The Oswego is the portion of the NYS Canal system that today accommodates the largest vessels.  The Oswego Canal flows north from the Syracuse area to terminate at Oswego.  Click here for the port of Oswego site.

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In the last mile of so of the Oswego Canal, locks 6 (shown far to the left below) through 8 provide a lift of over 40 feet.

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I still have a few more posts related to the canal, but this has been my attempt to identify my own six idiosyncratic but organic zones of the waterway.  Thanks for sticking with me.

 

Enjoy more blue and gold boats today, and these are called SPS’s . . . as in self-propelled scows.  Generally they have a house at stern and lifting capability forward, as you can see on SPS 52.  The inclusion of these details is where the similarity among these vessels ends . . . as you will notice in the variety of houses below.

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SPS 59.

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SPS 60 in summer of 2014 and

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in late spring of 2009.  For details on this photo, click here and here for photos of the launch on Onrust, assisted by an SPS.

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And then–as with the tenders and buoy boats–there are SPS’s with registry numbers but no “numeric name,”  if you catch my drift, like the one below with registry ending in …305 seen here and

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here, as well as

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. . . 327.

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Let’s look closer at SPS 60’s propulsion.

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For more info on Thrustmaster propulsion, click here.  For thrusters like these on a huge crane, click here.

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I have no idea how many SPS’s operate on the canal or how old these are or when such vessels first served the canal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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In reverse commentary on the photos above, photo #9 just above was the heron that checked me back into Waterford after seven days on the Canal.  Photo #1 way above is the heron that stood guard in Oswego.  In between . . . Margot and Cheyenne headed west and then east.  Enjoy these photos sent along on this inflexible old laptop.   As of this writing, I’m guessing Margot is approaching the sixth boro for the dazzled Slater move tomorrow.  I hope my sixth boro friends get good pics of the move from KVK to albany.

More photos soon.

 

Here was the first in what could be a series.   And this foto I’m happy again to credit  to Bob Stopper, some of whose photos can be seen here.   I’m not sure what the naming system is for Canal Corporation, but some of their vessels are named for towns with locks–like Pittsford– along the Canal.

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Ditto–in this foto from my sisterWaterford.   By the way, the pre-eminent website for all things Erie Canal is fred’s at tug44.

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In push gear and looking great at 85 years old, it’s Governor Cleveland.

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If I still lived up that way, I’d get one of these, a buoy boat.

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I don’t know how many of these there once were, but they are disappearing!

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Click here for a foto of this deep looking Governor Roosevelt with her belly exposed.

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There’s Grand Erie, and then there’s just plain Erie.

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Then there are the self-propelled scows, but notice the difference in

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engine exposure between this one shot by my sister and

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SPS-54 shot by me

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in August in Lyons.

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Thanks to Bob and Lucy for these fotos.  The last two are mine.

Late October 2011, Day Peckinpaugh and Frances Turecamo float above Lock 3, post-Irene, seen here through the eyes of the master of Tug44.

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Here’s Day Peckinpaugh last weekend, nose to nose with Urger, the latter here for shaft work.

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It’s unknown when if ever the DP will operate again.  Here and here are previous posts with the Eriemax bulk carrier.

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Blount’s two decade old Grande Caribe applies the same design to contemporary passenger cruising.  Notice the popped-down house;  in this post from three years ago, the house is up. I’d love to hear from someone who’s sailed on one of these “small ship adventures.”  Shipboard romance?  What are the stopping off places for adventuring off the mother ship?

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And compare the tug Frances Turecamo (1957) in the top foto to her incarnation now.  It’s great to see her back at work.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Thanks to Jonathan Boulware , interim president of South Street Seaport  Museum, for passing along  this article and video of salvage of Astrid.

Today . . . as time constricts . . . just vessels, mostly under way, like Frances, at the confluence.

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Govr. Cleveland and Eighth Sea, locking and swaying.

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Eighth Sea, stopping at Rusty Anchor to lubricate a wobbly shaft . . . it was rumored.

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I’m out of my depth here.

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Kathleen Turecamo and Dean Reinauer, about to move RTC 106 downstream to the sixth boro.

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Govr. Cleveland passing the scrap dock.

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Herbert P. Brake pushing HR-Bass downstream.  Crosby colors?

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Benjamin Elliot at the Troy wall.

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Gowanus Bay approaching the Troy lock.

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Margot making a grand entrance.

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Tender #3 near the Roundup.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who feels quite the time crunch right now.

First, and I quote, the roundup “began in 1999 as a way to preserve and promote the maritime industrial heritage of the State Canal System….”  Many thanks to the sponsors and the volunteers.   Thanks to the town for their “hawsepitality”  (That’s Jed’s newly minted term.) which brings about 25,000 people to a Saratoga County town of fewer than 10,000.

What light is this illuminating the Second Avenue Bridge between the town and Peebles Island?  And what is the kayaker . . .

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and all these others looking at . . .

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while bathed in varying light?

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If you do Facebook, catch about a minute of the grand finale of  Fireworks by Alonzo‘s artistry in Waterford the other night here.

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Waterford’s pyrotechnics are unusual because the geography makes you feel them.  There’s light, sound, and some serious concussion, and that’s all one thing, singular.  And the only thing I like more than watching the explosive colors is to see what they illuminate. . .  like Mame Faye and the glassy water–after an almost shower–at the confluence of the Erie Canal and the Hudson River.

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Scroll through here for my video of the show four years ago.

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I’m awed by the power and flash reflected in this fresh water.   Click here for my fotos from the first roundup I attended seven years ago.

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And then it’s morning and time to clean up, check

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the condition on the barge, move

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the tow to a place where the ebris can be offloaded, and

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send in the underwater inspection expert.

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??

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For that underwater inspection of prop and flanking rudders . . . that’s tomorrow’s post.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who needs to get to his paying job.

Here’s a fireworks post I did a little over a year ago.

Blue is the colour of the sky . . .”  in the Donovan song of almost a half century ago, but this isn’t a post about foliage, although I took this foto Friday . . . if you’re wondering why I didn’t post.  Guess the location?

Brown is the color of the Hudson, yesterday, as seen high above crane barge Columbia (and Sarah Ann??) viewed from Storm King, about 60 miles north of the sixth boro.

Brown flows under Margot and Benjamin Eliott at Waterford about a hundred miles north of Storm King.

It has been the color of the Hudson and feeders streams since the visitation of Irene (note the high point on the Second Street Bridge) and the rest of the rainy season in the Hudson and other Northeast watersheds.

But go another 70 or so miles north of Waterford, not far from the headwaters of the Hudson (as far north from the sixth boro as Washington DC is south!!) and the

waters through the rock

are clear, not cafe au “way too much” lait.

Twas a good place to get away and

reconnect.  Hiking here . . . offers no clue of what cliffs lie downstream.

I know I missed the arrival of tugs Justice and Reinauer Twins and who knows whatever else     . . . come through the boro, but gallivants can’t and shouldn’t be postponed.

Fotos by Will Van Dorp.   More Donovan?

And speaking of colors from inks and pigments as multi-hued as nature up north, check this out from my favorite niche-leaping, river-crossing, shipshifting cliff-dweller . . .  and so much more.

For explanations on all manner of color, checkin with seaandsky.

My last post on the Roundup is a catch-all with some video at the end.  It include vessels that just happen to be in the area.  Like Kathleen Turecamo (1968), docked at Port of Albany.

Cynthia of C. D. Perry.  Notice the exposed engines, and

follow the vertical shaft of the drives.  I’d love to see what’s below the waterline.  Doubleclick enlarges most fotos.

Mame Faye actually works during the Roundup and allows no tours.  I suppose what you see is there what you see.  The major task she performs during the event is driving the barge that carries the pyrotechnics, always a first-rate show by Alonzo.  Mame Faye got over 80 votes this year in the “people’s choice” tug contest, and I hope she wins next year.

In the yard up by Lock 3 waits the Frances

Turecamo (1957). Note the wood-grain illusion painted onto the house.

Beautiful as an old Land Rover used for agricultural work, this one is nameless and peerless, and for sale.

If it’s still for sale, you could paint it orange and call it Tiger Lily.

I love the H-bitt and deck fittings but I can’t store a boat in my current location and will have to stay

with human-powered boats.  That being said, this is an eye-turner.

Push contests here include:  1.  Decker bested by Gowanus Bay, 2.  Gowanus Bay v. tug44 that feels like porcupine love, 3.  Indignant noises raised by the Sheriff’s boat, 4.   Decker getting pushed nearly to the Canadian border by The Chancellor, 5. Decker besting Atlantic Hunter who then needs the Sheriff to assist, and 6. Toot Toot treating a push-off against The Chancellor as a love-nuzzling fest and the larger boat backing off in … embarrassment?

Donjon’s Empire walks circles and other boats whistle their appreciation and Crow demonstrates its house-raising ability.

Fotos and video by Will Van Dorp.

Details today, delightful ones like the house of Crow,

stern of Margot in front of portside and rope fender Governor Cleveland,

stern of The Chancellor in front of Margot,

twin barges 1914 Lehigh Valley 79 and 1942  Pennsy 399 (venues for music and photographic displays),

stern of Wire and Governor Cleveland,

lots of stacks,

bow wave of Wire,

W. O. Decker downbound in Federal Lock,

bows of MV Bear and Seahorse (from Ontario and Connecticut, respectively),

and bow of Hestia in front of Crow.

The Roundup had two music stages this year:  New York Canal System tug Grand Erie and Lehigh Valley barge 79 .   Enjoy these snippets from a group called Tug Bitts.

Capt. Walter E. Hughes joined Tug Bitts on stage for this unlikely Johnny Cash piece.

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