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Quick update on National Maritime Day from Belfast, Maine.  What got me here was this vessel, today a platform for tours between here and the Arctic mostly.  Wanderbird started this stage of her life after fishing for 30 years, cod and herring.  The shoes in the foreground reflect its origins  . . . launched in 1963 as a beam trawler in Maassluis, Holland.

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What enforces this sign is . . .

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this.  David put the specs up on yesterday’s post.

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The “towed” vehicle will be observed from here.

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Also on hand are Maine Maritime Academy vessels.  Here’s tug Pentagoet, training vessel powered

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by two sets of Detroit diesels.  Note this is one set, two blocks mounted together.

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And the wheelhouse . . . shows TLC.

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Another MMA vessel is Ted, as in

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Ted Nusunginya, revealing its previous Alaska work and soon to be renamed for an MMA alum.  Vessel Ned is a classroom, a lab, in fact, for courses such as Navigation, Celestial Navigation . . . and more.

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The pilot boat is

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Florida built.

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If you have a chance, you might fall in love with Belle fast.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I could have called this “other peoples fotos,” but these are also quite unusual.  Foto below comes many thanks to John Watson.  According to John, it anchored off Bay Ridge for less than 12 hours yesterday to bunker.   The last time this blog touched on livestock of the bovine sort was the post Cows in CATS.  What I know about the vessel follows at the end of this post.

Foto below comes thanks to Capt. Stig Samuelsson.  Take your guesses and locate the info below.  I cropped Stig’s foto slightly to obscure a giveaway.

Finally, I put in this foto that I took on Sunday:  this is a classy little cabin cruiser out of New Jersey.  I posted a foto of it last year as well . ..   I have no idea about the name or manufacturer, but my guess is that it was built within a 30ish mile radius of the sixth boro.

Answers:  John’s foto shows Shorthorn Express;  as of this writing, it’s headed up Delaware Bay, probably to Wilmington.  And it’ll load cows for Turkey.  Anyone get fotos along the way to Wilmington?  Shipspotting offers a dozen fotos, including several showing the vessel–scrapped 20 years ago–that previously bore this name.  What’s clear on those fotos is the elaborate ventilation system needed to keep the “shorthorns” happy during the passage.

Stig’s foto shows Harry, a tug built in 1887 as steam tug Stora Korsnäs 1.  According to Stig, Stora Korsnäs 1 was typical of tugs used to tow lumber along the coasts of northern Sweden.   She currently runs as a museum with a volunteer crew.  If you can’t read this, you can at least look at fotos.  It’s based halfway between Oslo and Goteborg and right across the water from the northern tip of Denmark.  Click here for a youtube of Harry underway.

Sad news:  Lady Jane MAY be not long for this world.

 Lady Jane is 1963-Belgium built North Sea trawler looking a lot like Wanderbird and Cape Race.  Tim Zim (whom I met when he visited the sixth boro a half year ago … see seventh foto here)  has been restoring her  for seven years, but recently hauled her and learned the hull was more corroded than he had thought.    He wants to give up . . . he says in the post.  But, I’m wondering if you could get a second opinion.   A friend who read Tim’s July 25, 2011 post recalled that LV-118 aka Lightship Overfalls was in worse condition and was brought back.   Details in that link about the “restoration miracle.”  Please drop Tim an email with encouragement and (even better) technical advice.

… is Inuktitut for … well, you can read it below.

I could have called this post Wanderbird 4.  Some of the time aboard I spent looking through this book by Nat Igloliorte.

It’s common knowledge that from the sixth boro . . . i.e., local waters commingling among the other five boros of NYC . . . even with a relatively small vessel, you can get to anywhere on the millions of miles of coastline on the planet.  And folks in boats and ships of all sizes have seen or intend to see multitudes of seascapes and landscapes on that coastline.

Here a certain blogger reads about gunkholes that lie in his future.

As Wanderbird left its sibling Cape Race, I wondered when the two vessels next would meet and raft up.

So did Pitsik.  Where are we going, he wondered in dog thoughts.

When . . . I wonder  . . .  will Captains Karen and Rick be lowering in warm seas and when among icebergs?

Thanks again to David Blitzer for his fisheye fotos here.  His show at 350 Bleeker Street (here) stays up until December 27.

ᑕᑯᓛᕆᕗᒍᒃ . . .   or   takulaarivuguk

Unrelated:  The concluding installment went up on my blog My Babylonian Captivity.

(Doubleclick enlarges fotos.) With a favorable weather window,  tomorrow nightfall may find Wanderbird out the Narrows and at sea, bound for Puerto Rico.    But midday today, she was

anchored off Piermont, off the old Camp Shanks.  More Camp Shanks later.

Captain Rick Miles came calling ashore in the skiff.

At daybreak Paolo and Pitsik bade farewell to Atlantic Basin as

we left  the Basin–where Clipper City and Cape Race remained–and

steamed upriver past a very sleepy version of the so-called “city that never sleeps.”  This morning I had doubts about that moniker.  And with an icy blast coming out of the north, sleeping in would not be such a terrible option, but

for me, the ride up to Piermont–in a wheelhouse listening to yarns from Culebra to Greenland and  smelling soup savors wafted up from the galley–it was sweet.

Thanks to Captains Rick and Karen for the chance to steam upriver a few hours.  Here’s their site.

For folks who want numbers:  Wanderbird‘s Industrie engine generates 510 hp, consuming a gallon a mile while cruising at 500 rpm and spinning a 8″ shaft and a 62″ four-bladed prop.

A great picture book about the hundreds of very similar North Sea trawlers, check out Arie van der Veer’s Van Zijtrawler naar Hektrawler (From Side Trawler to Stern Trawler).  It has hundreds of fotos.  An English-language article with pics on this category of trawler can be seen here.

Check out this blog from Labrador for more info on the Canadian husky above named Pitsik (scroll to August 18, 2010) AND the schooner Issuma (scroll to August 10), currently on Lake Ontario and written about here last month.  Here’s another Issuma post.    For pics of Wanderbird in the Caribbean, check out these by David Blitzer, whom I met on the trip to Piermont.  See info on David’s show at 350 Bleeker Street here.

Fair winds, Wanderbird.

9 a.m.  ... Wanderbird coming through the Gate?  (Remember… doubleclick enlarges.)

Well, I knew it wasn’t, given all that capacity up forward.

but a little over half an hour later, she wandered in.  Wanderbird was built for capacity, too, and from 1963 when the Jaczon family launched her, until 1990, she fished.  Here’s a link for another Jaczon beam trawler operating out of Scheveningen  (and you should hear me pronounce that town name in my best dialect).

The bridges making up this immediate  entry to the Gate are (farther and pink)  the Hell Gate Bridge and

the RFK.

Solomon Sea (ex-Brandon Roehrig) with its string of scows led

the way through.

The candy-striped stacks belong to Big Allis

over beyond Roosevelt Island in Ravenswood, Queens.

As I’m seeking to confirm, Wanderbird sips fuel . . . five gallons/hour!   Click here and here to see  youtube of  six-cylinder diesels by the same manufacturer, Industrie.

More on Wanderbird soon.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Whatzit in this study?  Where is this library?  (Note:  Doubleclick enlarges most fotos.)

It depends.  Monday under a sky itching to rain the library was here as this vessel wandered

in through Hell Gate, and made her way between

Gracie Mansion and Astoria and then past

Roosevelt Island and Upper Bay-bound on the

East River, under the 59th Street Bridge with Padre Island and a mysterious black bird in pursuit.

Meet Tim Zim, master of Lady Jane, about 3000 miles from homeport  himself.  Tim, admiring the wheelhouse,  is guest aboard Wanderbird.

Until she “repositions” in the Caribbean, taking aforementioned blue macaw along, Wanderbird rests here, rafted up with Cape Race, a vessel of similar lines.  Coincidentally, all three North Sea trawlers–Wanderbird, Cape Race, and Lady Jane–launched in 1963 …. though in Netherlands, Canada, and Belgium, respectively.    Hmmm . . .  I know some very good folks launched in 1963 also, an auspicious year for launchings.

Also nearby,  for the time being,  are this Cunard vessel,

Clipper City, and Shearwater, all previous mentioned in this blog.

More on Wanderbird soon.  Do check this link for beauty shots AND historical fotos of Wanderbird.  I love the red sails.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but important:  Click here for the agenda for MWA‘s Waterfront Conference.  Lower Manhattan Tuesday, Nov 30 from 8 am until 7 pm.  More than 100 speakers in the following formats:   2 plenary sessions, 15 breakout sessions, and 2 boat tours.     Click here for background on the MWA.   See you there.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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