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March 2011,

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March 2010, and

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… can it be and not in Kirby white but

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Vane classic green?

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the LongIsland-built tug with a Louisiana name, Houma!  And pushing DBL 25!

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All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Part 1 of this series looked like this.  Now more.

Madeline, 2008

Duty, 2006

Lindsey, 1989

Brandywine, 2006

More Lindsey

More Duty.

More Madeline.

More Brandywine, and Amberjack and Bold.

Of course Brandywine ranges far and wide, and these days, maybe so does Inland Sea heading south here from the Ben Franklin Bridge.

All fotos last week by Will Van Dorp.

Not a tug . . .  Blount-built Sailor (1977) delivers lubricants to suezmax crude carrier  Cape Bowen. A sixth-boro Blount boat is Twin Tube.  Sailor and Twin Tube–now that’s an evocative set of names– have similar hulls but houses at opposite ends.  But have you guessed the answer to the ponderable at the end of the post a few days back?

Also not a tug:  fragile lightship Barnegat, here on the mud in North Camden.

Still not a tug:  SS United States.  Don’t the lines suggest the throat pleats of a rorqual?  Got some names of tug companies common in the Delaware but not depicted here the past few days?

Bouchard is one.  Morton IV is a regular in the sixth boro, here approaching the Commodore Barry Bridge.

K-Sea is another.  I’m not sure why Coral Sea lies beside Arthur W Radford here in the Navy Yard.

And then there’s Penn Maritime . . .  here’s Amberjack.  Penn specializes in transporting heated asphalt.

But Vane Brothers is ubiquitous.  Here’s Pokomoke, and

Patuxent,

Bohemia,

Charles Hughes, and

Roanoke.  Two other Vane boats lay in the Schuykill, but too close to Sunoco to risk taking a foto.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, but again special thanks to Jeff Schurr and John Curdy.

You might wonder what’s happening in the sixth boro.  Me too.  I need to have a look, although I’ve really enjoyed Pelican Passage‘s  shots these weeks.  See some  fireworks here.  As for me, it’s prime gallivant season the next few weeks.  See you on the go.

News flash:  unrelated . . . is it true that a duck nursery has been located inside Cornell‘s bow pudding?  Don’t you feel cooled just looking at this January foto?

First, as a followup to Fleet Week, check what stealthy vessel Mitch  (Newtown Pentacle’s) caught over by the Sound end of the East River here.  It’s the m-ship aka M80 stiletto, a quintmaran . . . by my count.

My first time to see Maurania III.

Built in 2004.  Anyone seen where Rosemary‘s been assigned these days?

Irish Sea (ex-Clipper) 1969.

The two Hornbeck boats are Erie Service (nearer) and Eagle Service.  Tanker is Minerva Anna, and the dredge is 996 with an assemblage of small service boats along the starboard side.

Sassafras bunkers Ambassador Bridge.  In the lower right, the yellow machines are called straddlers aka container-haulers.  With so many parked there, I guess Port Elizabeth was quite slow Thursday afternoon.  Here’s a youtube of a straddler in action;  lots more to the right there.

A slow day …?  From left, Nicole Leigh Reinauer, Kristy Ann Reinauer, (I can’t make out the two smaller Reinauer boats farther in), Gramma Lee T Moran, Laura K Moran, Margaret Moran, Marie J Turecamo, Cape Cod, Pati B Moran, and Miriam Moran.

Norwegian Sea: high, dry, and missing its wheels.

Catherine C Miller and company.

Mia Forte Elsa . . . must be nobility.

Linda Moran

All fotos in the past two weeks by Will Van Dorp.

Two related Youtubes . . . not mine.  Thanks to John van der Doe for pointing the way.

Start with this one and this story about a Rotterdam–Murmansk tow (with 44,000 hp of tug power) gone awry partly because of a difference between the captains and the insurers.

First, Smit-Lloyd 115 tows Takpull 750 in rough water.  The soundtrack reminds me of Dutch pop music of my parents wartime generation.

Second, if you can really indulge me . . . here’s another video that gives the English translation of that same music sung by (trans.) the Harborsingers. Great traditional Dutch costumes too.

When I headed out this morning, blues as I had written about them here a quarter year ago had no place in my consciousness but tell me this:  were my eyes malfunctioning or is this not the most disarming set of blues ever painted onto a ship?  These blues set off Laura K. Moran‘s pure beet red.  And, as if that were not enough, a second

blue ship, different hue,  came along too, tailed by Margaret Moran.

Minerva tankers are typically black with the owl logo, unlike Minerva Joanna.   That’s Patapsco in the distance.

Aegir (436′ x 64′) is junior as container ships go, but check out the top of her load.

In from Sweden, maybe that’s where Joanna grew her disarming blues,

It’s a Caterpillar D6R.  Do we import these now?

Those blues really set off the colors and angles on Laura K.

Doesn’t Richmond Terrace here seem tropical?

What outatowner would imagine the shore off to the left of the foto lies within the confines of New York City?   Catch the Staten Island end of the Bayonne Bridge (my logo) off to the right side of the foto.

Is that port of registry this St. John’s?  Or this one?  Notice the confabulation on the stern portside?

Partner tug to Laura K. is Miriam, of course.  Oh, and it’s Tzoanna.

All fotos taken by Will Van Dorp, who was in a very good mood, in case you wonder.  Click here for squidoo’s thoughts on associations with the color blue, green red, orange . . .

Check out NYC:The Blog here.

See what Rotterdammer Fred Vloo and I have in common here, as pointed out by Rick “Old Salt.”  Thanks, Rick.

The idea here comes from the “eyed but not seen until it’s noticed” department.  I noticed the Brooklyn church on the hill behind Linda Moran only recently.  I’ve no doubt I’d seen it many times before, but my glance never lingered there.  Now, I am unable to NOT see it.  It is the basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, OLPH, for short.    Between Linda and OLPH is the Brooklyn Army Terminal, designed by the legendary Cass Gilbert.

This got my wondering about other churches visibly prominently  from the sixth boro.    Like St. Michael’s in Sunset Park, Brooklyn.  I know some might find this heretical, but as a newbie in the sixth boro, I considered the possibility that the 200′ egg-tipped spire might be a minaret.

Just forward of Megan McAllister is St. Mary Star of the Sea in Bayonne, as seen from Richmond Terrace, Staten Island.

Just above Ellen McAllister‘s stacks, Our Lady of Mount Carmel is mostly obscured here by the IMTT tanks.

St Peter’s in New Brighton, Staten Island can’t be missed.

Just astern of Kristy Ann Reinauer, St Patrick’s in Elizabeth, New Jersey, has two spires.  The single white spire to the right of the courthouse tops First Presbyterian on Broad Street in Elizabeth, a congregation going back to 1664.

From this 2007 foto, it’s Riverside

Church in Manhattan.  In the foto above, left to right:  Dorothy Elizabeth, Patapsco, Lucy Reinauer, and unknown.  Can anyone identify this Moran boat below?  Answer below.

And since I’m asking, here’s a church along the Brooklyn side of East River aka Easy River, taken in 2007, I cannot identify.  Anyone help?

If you wish to add other church landmarks, let me know.

All fotos here, Will Van Dorp.

Moran boat below Riverside Church is Paul T. Moran, answer thanks to Allen Baker.

New twin house arrangement with complex logo on forward/back stacks?

Nah!  Just Patapsco assisting Peter F. Gallatly with turn to port while backing off the dock.  Note the twin circlers in the sky with one witness.

Peter (94′ x 34′ x 14′ and 4200 hp)  was launched three years after Patapsco (96′ x 34′ x 15 and 4200 hp) ;  hull 141 to Patapsco’s 124.  And the barge is blue-house GCS 238.

Looking at shapes, just basic externals, I’d call Peter F the 16th Vane Brothers vessel of that class.

Two peas

in a pod; yellow

stripe among green.  At least for now.

Jed caught this foto even more recently, blue-house GCS 235 moved on the hip by green stripe by Sassafras (90′ x 32′ 13′ and 3000 hp) built at Chesapeake Shipbuilding.

Green with blue and yellow . . . almost like courtship this spring.  Foto was taken at the head of Gowanus Bay.  Ship in the background was subject of post a month back;  foto then also taken by Jed.

All fotos, except the last one by Jed, by Will Van Dorp.

What I would like to know is how widely known is “seaspeak,” or SMCP.  Or, how much have seaspeak principles been morphed–voluntarily or by regulation–into common VHF practice?

Most large ships look alike, allowing for differentiation into groups like container ship, tanker, RORO, pure car truck carrier, and then sub-groups with military vessels. Explanation:  physics,  global standards related safety, and the dictates of efficiency.

But within a tank, any of a range of fluids might live;  within a container, a limitless number of goods might be moved.  So it’s not  surprising–given the diverse points of origin of sixth-boro traffic–that a need exists for a simplified but unambiguous standard language.

As to signs of this diversity in shipping?  Check out Al-Mutanabbi.  That’s not “al” short for “Allen” or “Alberto” either.  More on the “al” at the end of this post.  I’d no idea until I looked it up that

Al-Mutanabbi was an Iraqi poet who died more than 1000 years ago.  In the foto above, vessel in the distance is MSC Dartford.

Elixir suggests magic for me, until

I learn that Yang Ming, a Taiwanese company with a history that dates back to the Qing dynasty (the last dynasty before the “republic”),  has a whole set of  container vessels with “e” names like Efficiency and Eminence.  Give me elixir any day.  By the way, that’s Vane’s Sassafras passing port to port.  By the way, sassafras was once a major ingredient of that great elixir called root beer.

Lian Yun Hu . . . I’ve not much clue about, other than that it’s owned or managed by Cosco, conjuring up thoughts of Cosco Busan and Shen Neng 1, of San Francisco and Great Barrier reef notoriety, respectively.

Most watchers of the boro would be clueless here without

a little help elsewhere on the exterior of the ship.

In Hindi, I’m told, “jag PLUS prerana” means “world”  AND “inspiration.”  Now, I wish they put an asterisk there with a translation painted just above the waterline somewhere.  I’d want to know that!

A large number of ships in the harbor are constructed in Korea.  And their names are straight-forward English although generally hangul writing coexists with English.  Tug is Amy C McAllister.

An interesting fact about hangul is that its invention gets credited to a Korean king named Sejong, a Renaissance man on that peninsula a  half-millennium ago.

All of which I use to illustrate my point:  if I didn’t read or understand English, I’d be helpless.  And I’m really just a shore-watcher.  Without an international language, communication on the sea–as in the air–would be worse than garbled.

Finally, here’s a gratuitous shot of Flintereems, from the land of my mother tongue.  Spelling notwithstanding, I believe the “eems” in this Flinter vessel refers to the river whose estuary forms the border between the Dutch and the Germans.  I set Goldman Sachs atop the Flinter  deck to mimic the last Flinter vessel “borg” appearing on this blog here.

All fotos, Will Van Dorp.

For a perspective on some verbal and non-verbal communication in the harbor, check out bowsprite here.

Oh . . . Al the prefix in Arabic means “the.”   You know it from such English words as “algebra, alchemy, algorithm” and –believe it or not–“elixir.”    Here’s more on that.

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