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The first two fotos here come compliments of Lou Rosenberg, who probably wondered when I was going to use them.  Sorry, Lou.  Gelberman, named for a former NYACE District Chief of Ops, has appeared here and elsewhere on this blog previously.

Lou took this foto, as well as the one above, in Jamaica BaySea Horse aka WPB-87361 calls Portsmouth, VA home.

Here USACE Hayward churns its way eastbound on the KVK.

A Coast Guard RBM got close and personal last weekend on a breezy Upper Bay.

Sturgeon Bay seems eager for ice-breaking season to begin.

Kittery, ME-based  USCG vessel WMEC-909 Campbell cruises out the harbor a month or so back.

Final foto . .. a new vessel at GMD Bayonne is named for a Medal of Honor recipient, whose itinerant life is described here T-AK  3005 must have arrived within the past week.

Thanks again to Lou Rosenberg for the fotos from Jamaica Bay, a section of the sixth boro that somewhat neglected on this blog.

Other fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a quick sampling of people outside on the sixth boro.  For every one person out on deck, at least a half dozen work inside or sleep in preparation for working later.  There’s channel marking maintenance,

fotos to take before (Port Said here) heading for sea,

(It only looks like he’s walking the top of the rudder.) docking lines to catch and

run out to the bollards before

heading off to the next job.

watches to

stand,

barges to secure like this one nudged in by Sassafras,

line to tidy up,

breathers to catch before the frenzy of 18 hours in port.

Out there and inside . . .you keep the traffic going safely and without incident. Bravo!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

That milk campaign started almost two decades ago.   No one can dispute its success, I suppose, in selling milk, but I always thought the text should have read “Got napkin?” or “Got  a clean part of sleeve?”

The slogan came to mind yesterday:  I was hanging out along the KVK, teeth chattering as barometer of approaching hypothermia, having fun, and seeing snow and ice in unusual places.  So, maybe I can correct what I always imagined to be the flaw of the milk ads . . .  Like, the crew of Morgan Reinauer asking . . . “got a snow brush?”

Crewman on Taurus . . .”Got some

warm dry gloves?”

Janice Ann Reinauer herself, “Got my old bow pudding?”

Crew of Katherine Walker, “Got the GPS coordinates?”

Ruth M. Reinauer, “Got a warm notch somewhere, maybe RTC 102?”

Morton S. Bouchard Jr., “Got a berth close by where I can dock this?

Irish Sea, “Got a snow scraper?”

Kimberly Poling, “Got some

warmer ports to deliver to?”

And, I swear, in an Australian-English accent, this pigeon said, “Got some food and hot coffee, or do I need to land on the deck of Piltene out there?”

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders how many days until he gets to walk around without a coat again.

Cold, though it’s all relative.  On the coldest day so far in the sixth boro it’s glided to a balmy 16 F;  thermometer in Barrow dropped to -38; International Falls, MN -34; Mount Washington Summit, NH -10; Montreal, Massena, and Toronto, -4; Rondout Creek, 0.

For the most-ice-encrusted award, check these fotos from tugster, April 2, 2008, with fotos taken in Boston February 2007.  Can anyone out-encrust this encrustedness?

Note:  Since I overdo the links sometimes, the two most important background ones here and this on the China Tea Trade and this on the China clippers.

I start this post with five older fotos; the one below showing crew tidying up lines on McAllister Responder dates from January 2007.   Until now, I’ve always focused on the foreground, not the background.  Of course, all those blue warehouses are now being replaced by Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Another example–Francis E. Roehrig (now Aegean Sea but ex-Jersey Coast and John C. Barker and as Francis E. a hero post-Bouchard accident) has always been focus of this foto for me rather than what’s in the background.

Again, I’ve focused until now on the foreground, on the 140′ icebreaking tug Sturgeon Bay instead of on the rich architecture of Brooklyn Heights,

in summertime obscured by a jungle of foliage, making it easier to focus of East River traffic like Express Marine’s Duty, below.  However, what I learned last week is that Brooklyn Heights has fascinations all

its own.  Like this house standing on Pierrepont Place, the house of Abiel Abbot Low, son of Seth Low of Salem, Massachusetts.   A. A. Low moved to Brooklyn Heights after spending six years in Canton’s markets dealing with Wu Bingjian aka Howqua.    From Brooklyn Heights, Low could observe

the goings and comings of his fleet of China clippers over at South Street when it was a seaport in the years between the First and Second Opium Wars.  Finding out more about the Lows ( and in subsequent generations their connections to the mayor of Brooklyn, Columbia University and FDR . . . ) those are adventures and work that lie ahead.  Last week I learned that what’s in the background might as well be an interesting focus as what is background.

Meanwhile . . . the drum calls to Coney Island, with the parade just four days off.  Here and here are links for 2009; first and second for 2008.  More tomorrow.  Plan to be in Coney on Saturday?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Uh– . . .actually the fleet had already entered through the Narrows, but look just to the right of the Brooklyn-side pillar . . . like disembodied fingertips ready to pluck VZ’s strings . . .

a fleet of the air . . . Hornets and

Ospreys and a single

Dolphin.  I understand the importance of the color, but I think of a clownfish whenever I see a Dolphin.  And those streams of water . . . FireFighter is pumping them out its monitors.

Later . . . Philippine Sea gets

assisted into its berth

on Staten Island.  By the way, the summertime haze here exists in 92-degree heat.

Between the bow of CG 58 the fendering of Catherine Turecamo, there’s  . . . protection.  In my layperson’s terminology, I’d call it a sheet.  Does it have a more technical name?

Between Robbins Light and Brooklyn, that’s Campbell.

Yes, I must “get the hang” of video, but enjoy this snippet.  A shot from the shore battery can be heard at 9 seconds, and Iwo Jima‘s response . . . just after the puff of smoke . ..  around 16 seconds in.  I’d stationed myself such that for its first three shots, Iwo Jima was obscured by the bridge pillar.

Tomorrow before dawn .  . I’m headed up to New Hampshire .  . . back in a week or less.  No offense intended, but sometimes I must balance the sixth boro waters and shorelines with canoes, woods, beavers, porcupines, songbirds and songfrogs, fresh fish ….  the list could go on.  I’ll bring foto evidence.

On a happy note:  In May 2008, I lamented here the fact that the NYTIMES had nary a word about the fleet entering the city.  Today the top center foto was of Iwo Jima here.  Bravo the New York Times . . . maybe they’ll rename the paper as the “all six boros of NY Times.”

FireFighter at the Narrows, Fort Wadsworth side . . . rainbow effect of spray . . . must be doins’  … big stuff going on or about to . . . .

Waiting on the Fort Hamilton (Brooklyn)  side, I espy a huge shape some five or six miles off, here between FDNY’s not-yet-in-service 343 and the venerable Driftmaster.  Iwo Jima (Mississippi-built) has returned!  See fotos I took on board last year here.

The first fleet vessel through the Narrows was PC-4, Monsoon, Louisiana-built, commissioned in 1994, here passing Ellen McAllister.  Scroll through this link to see a sampling of  fotos of Monsoon‘s adventures.

Next visitor in was WMEC 909, Campbell, the sixth cutter to bear that name, here with helicopter above and USACE vessels all around, from left, Moritz, (I believe that’s the stern of Dobrin … barely visible), Driftmaster, and Gelberman.  Campbell’s homeport is Portsmouth, NH.  See a previous appearance of Campbell on this blog here… last foto).

Next in, sibling of Monsoon . . . was Squall, commissioned in same year and state.

As Iwo Jima approached the Verrazano Bridge, a gun salute from Fort Hamilton drew

Iwo Jima‘s response.  By the way, the bit of land on the lower left side of the foto above is Hendrick’s Reef, on which the Brooklyn pillar of the Verrazano Bridge stands, an island that from 1812 until 1960 housed Fort Lafayette.  I wonder which Hendrick that was.

Ellen McAllister followed Iwo Jima in.  Is that Catherine Turecamo over on Iwo Jima‘s port side?

Next in was DDG 95, destroyer James E. Williams, named for a sailor who served in both Korea and Vietnam.  Read about her namesake here.

Then it was FFG 45, frigate De Wert, named for a sailor who died in Korea in 1951.

And then Bath, Maine-built CG 58, Philippine Sea.

Closer up . . . I can’t identify the Coast Guard 47-footer other than 47315.  By the way, see this type vessel’s capabilities as filmed in the mouth of the Merrimack River in all its fury.  The Merrimack was my obsession during part of the 80s and all of the 90s.

I didn’t see where Miriam Moran assisted (probably up at the Hudson River passenger terminal) but a while later I caught her headed to home base as Laura K. was out to Red Hook for an assist.  Check out the two crew on the afterdeck.

Hmm . . . I wonder what the story is.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, “Government Ships 5″ is the short title;  a longer version is “Their crews and all those sixth-boro based supporters.”

Welcome to New York.

A century ago, a parade of ships featured the Cruiser Olympia, now in very real danger of being reefed.

Staten Island Live has an excellent schedule of events planned the next few days on Staten Island, where most of the fleet vessels are berthed.  See the schedule here.

Final note:  I plan to cross the Merrimack aka “merry mack” tomorrow headed north for some canoeing.  See foto here.  The Pow Wow flows into the Merrimack.

Unrelated:  Have you ever heard of a fleet–a vital US government fleet–with NO ships?  Details at end of post.

I’d never blogged about this docking although I took these fotos of back about five years ago.  With almost-twin McAllisters (Responder and Charles) just beyond her wingtips,

Eagle glided eastbound on the East (could be misspelled as “Easy”) River ,

and overseen by an unidentified  65′ WYTL (Hawser?),

Charles D. approaches the stern as

as lines are made ready and then

hauled back in

Charles D assists.

Communication is vital as all those linehandlers get coordinated with

twelve hands working these wheels simultaneously.

Responder attends to the bow and all

lines are made fast.

and the wheels go unattended, hands down.

All fotos taken long ago (2005) by Will Van Dorp, and posted now inspired by bowsprite’s Escanaba post and Flickrstream.  And speaking of Flickrstream, check out this USCG photostream.

The US 10th Fleet has NO-ZERO-AUCUN ships.  Learn its mission here.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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