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Wondering what didn’t fit in this shot?

Towing on short hawser made to starboard bitt of scow,

a small tug with classy lines makes

its way eastbound on the KVK

with a sizeable tow.

It’s Thomas J. Brown, something unusual in the sixth boro:

a family-business that since its creation in the unpromising year of 1929 has seen a lot of change in the harbor.  Read copious details about this family business in Don Sutherland’s fine article here (starting on p. 18).   Just a foretaste: Lindbergh, slaughterhouses on the East River,  Normandie salvage, work on all the bridges between NJ and metro New York as well as the VZ and others,  the 1939 World’s Fair, ….  The tanker whose orange house shows lower left belongs to Torm Kristina.

Don, great article I’m just finding now.  There’s a lot of history in the wake of that tow.

All fotos (except the last one taken two years ago) were snapped  from my office one lucky day last week by Will Van Dorp.

All fotos and information here comes from John Sperr, last referred to here in relation to ice yacht Galatea, as its pilot.

Today’s post comes from the same area of the Hudson where iceboating was happening a mere two months ago.  Ice has now given  way to the fine color heralding leaves.  Clearwater has wintered on a mobile shipyard, a barge.  The “whiskey plank”  aka the last part of the hull to be closed up post-repair was recently steamed, jacked into place, and fastened.

Libation followed and then

parade, as the shipyard itself danced upriver clutched tight by Cornell to be offloaded in anticipation of rigging, which

would happen at

Scarano Boat.  The barge was slid into the travel-lift dock, slings

moved like fingers under the hull, and

Clearwater, cradled in these sturdy arms, was

carried onto the high-and-dry.  Notice Onrust in the background?  And Adirondack directly beyond Clearwater‘s stern?

This left the barge Black Diamond to assume other duties, become other things.

All fotos by John Sperr.  Thanks, John.

By the way, start imagining the weekend of June 19 and 20.  Mermaids on Saturday (with Laurie Anderson and Lou Reed !@#@! as Queen Mermaid and King Neptune)  and music on Sunday (with Pete Seeger and Lucy Kaplansky and many more!@#@##@!!)  ?  How can one make a choice like that?

Also, a tall ship and volunteer opportunity in Brooklyn:  PortSide NewYork FreeSail Clipper City 4-12-2010

I first saw Rae before she was Rae, when she was red and called Miss Bonnie.  Scroll through here.

Rae is approaching 60 years, two years shy of it.  And she’s not a behemoth:    46′ x 15′ x 5 with (at one time at least) 450 hp.  Rae hails originally from Texas, not far from the Louisiana border.

In the confines of at the mouth of Gowanus Canal, Rae might be the perfect tool. Some jobs call for dental picks and others for crowbars.

Whoa!!! And then sometimes small can do impressive work moving crushed rock!  And does it only look like Loujiane, the cement ship is assist vessel?  For other fotos on that ship, see here.

All fotos thanks to Jed, for whose work I am grateful.

This recalls the summer of 2005, though, when a smaller tugboat–Rachel Marie at 43′ x 16′ x 5′ — towed an artificial continent (based on drawings by Robert Smithson) round and round the sixth boro.  See tugster fotos here.  Has anyone seen Rachel Marie recently?

As to artificial continents, someone’s new vision for Governors Island-makeover includes hills and according to this article, canyons with vistas.

Unrelated:  Here’s a 2.5 minute audio slideshow for an article in the 4/19 New Yorker magazine, a story of a family towing life written by Burkhard Bilger.

For info on where the canal is, see this post from last year.  The distant red tug you see in that link is the 1907 Pegasus recently in drydock but now getting springtime service.  I visited this area of Jersey City and posted fotos a year ago here.

So yesterday seemed ripe for a revisit–as well as an ideal time to help with the springtime chores on Pegasus.  Here, from near to far are Little G, Sandy G, Katherine G (featured here), Pegasus, and a bit of Patriotic.

In the same order, this shows a closer view of Little G, and

as seen from Pegasus,  this view of Patriotic as

well as this one.

Shooting back toward the east, a classic 43-footer,  Linda G, and

Annie G II  (whom I’d imagine as Littlest G) .  That’s the lower Manhattan skyline in the background, exactly the location from which I shot the first foto in the first link of this post.

Here’s Cape Race, featured here, still on the south side of the Canal.

Some details on these:

Sandy G (1962), Katherine G (1981), Patriotic (1937, a Bushey formerly known as Rainbow), Linda G (1943), and Annie G II (2000).  Cape Race is Quebec-built, 1963.

All fotos, Will Van Dorp.

New twin house arrangement with complex logo on forward/back stacks?

Nah!  Just Patapsco assisting Peter F. Gallatly with turn to port while backing off the dock.  Note the twin circlers in the sky with one witness.

Peter (94′ x 34′ x 14′ and 4200 hp)  was launched three years after Patapsco (96′ x 34′ x 15 and 4200 hp) ;  hull 141 to Patapsco’s 124.  And the barge is blue-house GCS 238.

Looking at shapes, just basic externals, I’d call Peter F the 16th Vane Brothers vessel of that class.

Two peas

in a pod; yellow

stripe among green.  At least for now.

Jed caught this foto even more recently, blue-house GCS 235 moved on the hip by green stripe by Sassafras (90′ x 32′ 13′ and 3000 hp) built at Chesapeake Shipbuilding.

Green with blue and yellow . . . almost like courtship this spring.  Foto was taken at the head of Gowanus Bay.  Ship in the background was subject of post a month back;  foto then also taken by Jed.

All fotos, except the last one by Jed, by Will Van Dorp.

Just in case you haven’t guessed, tugster rides the tour  bus into the outskirts of Talltalesville sometimes . . . and in his offices along the KVK is reputed to converse with historical personages (more on this at end of post) and  . . . birds.  Like earlier this week, I was just comparing Easter dinner notes with Merg, one of my favorite red-breasted mergansers, and the conversation turned toward olives , my favorites, pitted kalamatas.  Did I say this “office” is near Snug Harbor, a place ghosts reputedly inhabit?  In this link see the last one third for ghosts.

When I noticed Merg’s crest was a bit wilder than a few minutes before,  I followed its line of sight and

I understood.  Shape and scale were both formidable.

Our conversation interrupted, Merg veered to starboard

as this leviathan followed.

Enough already, croaked Merg, heading for the east.

And if the immensity of the blue vessel were not enough, from alongbehind appeared . . . is it Laura K?

That was it for Merg, who dove.  Oh, the great blue container ship is Maersk Kalamata, the closest vessel to 1000′ loa I’ve seen in boro 6 in a bit.  Note Robbins Reef light just forward of the bow.

Marginally related:  the foto below dates from March 2, 2010 in the KVK.  I thought it was a seal.  I saw something (dark shape just to the left of bubbles) swim quite fast just below the surface, but now I’m thinking it might be a dolphin.  Anyone weigh in?  I know there’s not much fotografic clue here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Personages:  A few weeks ago, while I was relaxing on the dock aka my “office” in front of Sailor’s Snug Harbor, an older man ambled down the stairs and walked over to me.  I watch my back and front, so paid attention for awhile.  When he avoided eye contact  and seemed harmless and as fixated on the water as I was, I went back to shooting what passed.  After a few minutes, he waved and said, Foto, foto,”  while pointing to himself.  No matter what I said or asked, all he said was “foto foto,” so I figured why not and snapped his picture.  When I asked his name, he handed me a pizza menu.  Strange, given that he was Asian and I would swear he was Ho Chi Minh or at least his body-double recently.  By the way, HCM lived in Manhattan and Brooklyn between 1912 and 1918 after having worked in the galley of a ship a few years.)    I wouldn’t make this up.  So if that was you, get in touch and I’ll send the foto foto.

Jack Newman has appeared in this blog before here, but guess the port.  This foto comes courtesy of Guy Pushee.  Port info comes at the end of this post.

The newest–I believe–tug in the harbor is Timothy L. Reinauer, less than a month on the job . . . in its current incarnation.  Timothy L was Bridget McAllister and Ocean Star before that.  The upper house “stalk” seems pitched at some unusual angles relative to the waterline.

Welcome!  er . . . welcome back, Timothy.

Now this tug had me a bit mystified as it approached.  Its windowless superstructure has something in common with stealth ship like John Dark aka Jeanne d’Arc’s stealthy sidekick, now back at sea.

Remember most fotos enlarge with a doubleclick.  Try it and you’ll clearly see the stacks of Jennifer Turecamo.

OK, I’ve said it before:  Adriatic Sea roars that makes her seem larger than she might measure, so large–in fact–that she does not fit in this foto.

Here’s another fairly new vessel:  Laurie Ann Reinauer.

And fleetmate, Nicole Leigh Reinauer.

Closing out this edition, it’s Justine McAllister.  Note the Empire State Building in lower right corner of foto.  And, given the summer-like burst of temperature, the haze  (and fog) have moved in.

All fotos but Guy’s by Will Van Dorp.

The port is Wilmington, North Carolina . . . the Cape Fear watershed.  Here’s a link to more of Guy’s fotos.  Guy, thanks for sending the foto along.

Also, check out Cruceros Glenans post on the Robbins Reef Light, which just happened to creep into so many of these posts.  I don’t recall having seen the derivation of the name info here before.

Unrelated but really important, check out this unofficial poll from the US Naval Institute on historic vessels/monuments to save if triage is called for.

Fog . . . it’s fickle, patchy, and blinding.  Even with radar, I imagine it causes stress.  Count the tugboats below.  Follow the lights and you get two:  Patapsco and Wicomico from right to left.  Easter morning 645 am at IMTT.

Same place, 745.  I think the vessel is Maryland.

Same location.  800 am.  Meagan Ann, whom you saw here in snow now just barely a month ago.  Fog forms in warm land air (75 Sunday) over cold water.

Patapsco over by LaFarge silos (now fog-shortened) near Hess Bayonne, as seen from IMTT.  830 am.  Note:  Hess Bayonne is less than a mile to the east of IMTT, where earlier fotos were taken.

Eastbound Ivory Coast at IMTT.  900 am.

Westbound Ivory Coast, near Hess Bayonne, at 930 am, half an hour later than the previous shot.

Eastbound Stephen Scott, near Hess Bayonne, around 940.

A minute later, as vessel approaches the St George ferry terminal.

Westbound  tanker Ionian Wave, escorted by Brendan Turecamo just before 1000.  Note the Monitor-like appearance of the Staten Island ferry.

About 1001, Ionian Wave and Brendan Turecamo emerge from a fog bank.  Normally, the Manhattan skyline would be visible.

All fotos Easter Sunday morning by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  Mitch of Newtown Pentacle has been checking out the sixth boro these days and doing nice work.

Also related:  NYTimes article on the new FDNY fireboat, arriving . . . . soon.

Unrelated:  Shen Neng 1 in the Great Barrier Reef.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

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