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Just before 0700, Medi Osaka rounded the bend, low in the water as a galleon from the Andean mines.  Only two hours before, under darkness, Medi Osaka‘s soon-to-be berth was still occupied by Global Success, which had just completed discharging its payload of road salt, at least the part of the load gong to Atlantic Salt.

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Many media reports notwithstanding, there is road salt around.  Not all suppliers have been out.

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This clam shell has been steadily emptying out holds.

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Granted the salt has been leaving almost as quickly as it has arrived, but

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count the trucks . . .  a dozen and a half waiting  here . .  and more.

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For JS and others who know the place, yes, I’m atop the salt pile looking down on Leidy’s .  .  . not far from Sailor’s Snug Harbor.

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The trucks are there loading salt from Global Success even before Medi Osaka docks.

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There’s 36 feet of water here and then some.

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Note the crew watch the vessel inch up to the docking barge.

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The next post will show the linemen ferrying the lines to shore crews running them up to the bollards.

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Meanwhile, temperatures were almost to 50 F by the time I left here.

I took all fotos in this post last week on Staten Island.  Check out these 40-footers, and if I read the numbers right, these three all date from just over 60 years ago.   Somewhere in the past seven years  I posted  a foto of two of these three in the Arthur Kill.

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But this is an impressive adaption project, not restoration.  And I’ve finally gotten a close-up look. Fred tug44 got these fotos some years back, but for a vessel that dates from 1929 . . . not that long ago.   I wonder what her USCG-service name was.

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I’m curious about the horizontal tab on the rudder.    Enjoy the rest of these.

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All fotos taken recently by Will Van Dorp, who’s still in the wilds of northwest Georgia, hoping though to get back to the sixth boro in time to see Miss Lis.

What would a name like Ecology Queen lead you to expect?

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The Bayonne Bridge in upper right side of the foto should suggestion the location.   Also, just beyond the yellow crane with the red unit marked 450, you can see the upper house of Lincoln Sea.

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Ecology Queen is seriously boxy and equipped with a telescoping crane.

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I’m guessing she started like as a government boat . . . DEP –by the name– or Corps of Engineers by the functionality, but

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I don’t know.

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Notice the sheltered wheel and rudder.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, a few days ago at MHYC.  Click on that link for lots of fotos.

Sunsets can gild and indemnify the efforts of the day.  A lightship can help safely navigate the impending darkness.

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but sunsets can also torment.  Although it’s the last day of September and progress has been very slow in trying to raise the $$ to save Bertha,

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there is still time.  Someone must know someone who

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can help so that this hull gets completed, surfaces get gets sandblasted and repainted, and all the rest so that

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this handiwork will be complemented with

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clear views out these lights, and

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celebration.

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So that these D13000 speak again.

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And splash gurgle back out to sea

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Anchors lowered

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get raised.

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Help.

0aaaab14

Final foto by Allen Baker.  All others by Will Van Dorp, whose previous Bertha posts were here and here.

Here’s Bertha‘s blog.

(Doubleclick enlarges these again!! I’ll go back when I can and correct the “display setting” for the past few days.)

Thirty-six or so days after surging sixth boro waters tossed this “mothballed” tanker onto the shoreline at Clifton, Staten Island, efforts appear to be preparing to move it off. Crews have been assessing the condition of John B Caddell for some time, but as of nightfall today, tug Sarah Ann had barge Raritan Bay

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in position.

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I can’t say what this beach will look like tomorrow, so

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I took advantage of the 65-degree foggy evening to get

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what fotos I could.  It’s only an illusion caused by flood lighting that John B no longer has a bow, but come . . . a month from now,

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who knows.  This press release about a unified approach to removing the wreck made the rounds in my email yesterday.  Thanks to all who passed it along.

All fotos fresh from the camera and the dark room of Will Van Dorp.

John B.   three weeks after coming ashore.  Tethered . . . like an rogue beast.

Tagged . . . like a common railroad boxcar.

Examined by a scissor lift.

Quarantined and sequestered by yellow boom in her element and

orange pole and police tape ashore . . .

Her cavities and ducts probed, cathetered, and pumped out . . .

Prospects do indeed look grim for John B.  . . .  

her fate watched from the deep side.

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Since Ft Wadsworth’s still closed to the public, I’ve no news about the ‘scapegoats there. Anyone have word?

If you read Latin, you get it, this statement of Snug Harbor’s motto.  Otherwise, I’ll translate a bit farther down.  If you’ve never been, it’s worth a visit.

Here’s what KVK traffic looks like from the Minard Lafever-designed buildings of Snug Harbor, and

here’s what the waterside entrance to Snug Harbor looks like from the KVK . . . just between IMTT Bayonne and the “salt pile.”

The current feature exhibit is called “Treasures of Sailors’ Snug Harbor.”   The bust here is Robert Richard Randall, the sea captain whose charity established what became a home for thousands of aging seafarers.

The will establishing the institution was drawn up by Alexander Hamilton.

The Latin in this John LaFarge stained glass window translates as “We who are exhausted seek a harbor.”

If you’ve never been to SSH, you’ll enjoy three floors of exhibits, which include ship models like Massapequa and

Benjamin Brewster and

and Japan Ambrose.    And of course much much more,  such as

the entire John Noble collection, which I just scratched the surface on earlier this year here.  There’s even a Herman Melville connection here.

For directions to SSH, click here.

If you live near NYC , a great way to mark Memorial Day aka Decoration Day, visit any of the open piers.  Check out the “early history” in this wikipedia link.  I seized the morning out here, on DDG 57 USS Mitscher.

Here’s the view forward from the starboard bridge wing,

to port were CG-56 USS San Jacinto and DDG-56 USS Donald Cook.

and starboard aft toward DDG-66 USS Gonzalez.   On the tour I saw a wide range of specialists.

I had been assigned to Dewaruci, and went incognito, wanting to check some rumors . . .  like  . . as the US Navy has SEALS, but the Indonesians have

walruses!!  And it turns out they do!  Although, seriously, masks of different sorts are worn in traditional dances–reorgs–and the walrus represents strength.

Although Dewaruci was built at Stulken Sohn in Hamburg, begun in 1932 (pre-WW2 and therefore commssioned by the Dutch??) , it was completed in 1953, year four of Indonesian independence from the Dutch.  The design, then, dates from a time that commercial sail still existed.  But the detail on this vessel, currently on its last voyage, is phenomenal.  I haven’t seen so much wood carving on a vessel since I visited the schooner Anne.

Here’s the namesake hero aft

and forward.  The rest of the weekend I will be figurehead comparing, but this is hard to top.

Three main islands of Indonesia west to east are Sumatra, Java, and Irian Jaya;  so the three masts–fore to mizzen–of the vessel are decorated in those styles.  Here’s Sumatran.

and Javanese

with Garuda and

Irian Jayan, actually the western end of the island of New Guinea.

Here’s the wheel and

and the engine order telegraph.

A poster onboard shows the itinerary for this last voyage.  A replacement vessel is on order;  I’m curious whether it will

carry the same figurehead and wood carving.

An intriguing poster on deck also shows all the commanding officers from 1953 to present, from Majoor A. F. H. Rosenow to Haris Bima B. Letkol Laut.

Meanwhile, I have confirmed that the Indonsian Navy has walruses, which I was unable to interview, and

flies the jolly roger.

Tomorrow I head over to Brooklyn.

All fotos and story by Will Van Dorp.

January 1909.  New Jersey-built Ambrose LV-87 in second year on the job.  Photo by N. L. Stebbins.  Click on the next two fotos and you’ll get to their context.  Click here for many more Stebbins fotos.

January 1912, a mere 1202 months ago.  Ambrose at work with White Star Olympic passing in background. Olympic at this time was less than a year on the job and already suffered one collision.  Four months later, of course, her younger sister ship would begin its ill-fated maiden voyage to New York.

I recall seeing this foto before I moved to New York and imagined that “channel 87″ was the means to contact the vessel.  Oh well . . . live and learn, eh?

March 2012.  Ambrose in her 46th year post-decommissioning after having served the USCG (and precursors) 59 years.  Photo by Birk Thomas.  In lower right hand corner, that’s Atlantic Salt’s Richmond Terrace mountain.

St. Peter’s neo-Romanesque sanctuary has dominated the east end of the KVK for over a century.

Structure just forward of Ambrose here is Sono’s “postcards,” a 9/11 memorial.

This may be my last post for a while . . . am gallivanting south soon.

Many thanks to Birk for these fotos.

Related:  Click here for a Reginald Marsh mural of a black-hulled Ambrose.  Here are some crew shots from the late 1950s.

Unrelated:  Crossing the Darien isthmus right now is Ever Deluxe, which appeared just barely in this post from almost three years ago . .  and NYK Diana, a Howland Hook regular.

So here she came into the sixth boro yesterday . . .   and after getting a foto–albeit rainy– of Shorthorn Express a few weeks back, I

listened carefully for neighs and whinnies, and

wondered whether this vessel carried pregnant mares, or colt, fillies . . .

Catherine Turecamo and Gramma Lee T Moran 

churned the waters to get her into the dock, giving the gulls

something to swarm about.

Since the sixth boro has no snow on the ground, that pile

has to be the supply at Atlantic Salt dock.

Lines get run, so

that offloading operations can begin.

When all lines are fast, Gramma Lee heads home to await the next call.  Previously, when I inquired, I learned that some of the salt comes from

 Carrickfergus, Ireland, which seemed strange given New York state’s salt mines.  But then again, maybe not all salt is the same.  Certainly, I learned that a mare transporter doesn’t transport mares or anything remotely equine.

All fotos by will Van Dorp.

Related:  I went looking for evidence of shipping mares and other equines by water.  None found . . . horses go by 747!!  Sea voyages are for cattle and sheep.  Chickens . . . I guess they travel frozen.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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