You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Moran’ tag.

In case you didn’t vote for your favorite caption (I added a poll late in the day yesterday.) please go back to Followup #1 and cast your vote.

Also, thanks to Harold Tartell, here’s some “followup” info on Followup #2’s Canadian newsprint carriers:    “Three boats I have remembered their names to this day very well:  DONPACO, G D D, & G T D.  After doing some research this morning, I came across two more that I saw quite often, but had forgotten their names.  They were A C D and NEWSCARRIER.  All five were built in the 1930s. These boats were owned by Quebec Paper Sales & Transportation, Ltd.  During the canal season months, they would make at least two or three trips a week with newsprint for most of the New York City area newspapers.

Their trip to New York would begin in Quebec, down through the Chambly Canal which is part of the Richelieu River into Lake Champlain.  From Lake Champlain, they would traverse the Champlain or Northern Canal down to Waterford.”

Harold also sent some links that I wil explore after this week.

We’ve surfed QE2’s wake;  now let’s see if one could surf Linda Moran.

Some of you will not be pleased to see these, but here they are:  river surfing and tanker surfing.  I’m just the messenger.

If you’ve forgotten the context of the caption contest, click here.   For another look at the misplaced boat, here it is.

Contributors:  you’re all winners.  I like love all the suggestions I’ve received.  You can vote below at end of post.

From Buck:  ‘The GPS said this was the fastest route!’

From Les:  “A moment of soaring with the eagles led to an eternity of humiliation under the cormorants”

From JP:  “Winner of the 2010 speedboat hide and seek competition is announced.”

From bowsprite:  “No, I did NOT forget where I docked, I just don’t remember the name of the island.”

From Elizabeth:  “Strip ‘er fast, boys. The next one’ll be along in no time!”     or

“Too short!  Throw it back.”    or

“Man!  Another !@#@!!  Bayliner.  I was hoping we’d get a Sea Ray.”

From me:  “But I already rented this slip for the summer from the same guy who had a great bridge for sale.”

Until June 13, I’ll be “engaged” in remote Brooklyn, so each day all that can go up is one foto and a minimal caption of my own.  I’d love your comments.

Nothing better than  a summer’s day of New York boys hanging with the Turecamo girls?

More seriously, I’m spending my week in Brooklyn doing a workshop called Along the Shore:  Changing and Preserving the Landmarks of Brooklyn’s Industrial Waterfront, including some gunkholing all the way from Newtown Creek to Coney Island.  I’ll tell you about it when I’m back.

The rest of this week . . . minimal fotos ( one pic o day) and text, some might be funny and others not.  Send captions if you wish.

Unrelated but . .  if you’re looking for a definitive history of doryfishing, click here.  Thanks to Capt. Joey.

Some unescapable thoughts on the gusher . . .    from New Wars (for fun) and from the NYTimes OP-Ed

Now you get to vote:

First, as a followup to Fleet Week, check what stealthy vessel Mitch  (Newtown Pentacle’s) caught over by the Sound end of the East River here.  It’s the m-ship aka M80 stiletto, a quintmaran . . . by my count.

My first time to see Maurania III.

Built in 2004.  Anyone seen where Rosemary‘s been assigned these days?

Irish Sea (ex-Clipper) 1969.

The two Hornbeck boats are Erie Service (nearer) and Eagle Service.  Tanker is Minerva Anna, and the dredge is 996 with an assemblage of small service boats along the starboard side.

Sassafras bunkers Ambassador Bridge.  In the lower right, the yellow machines are called straddlers aka container-haulers.  With so many parked there, I guess Port Elizabeth was quite slow Thursday afternoon.  Here’s a youtube of a straddler in action;  lots more to the right there.

A slow day …?  From left, Nicole Leigh Reinauer, Kristy Ann Reinauer, (I can’t make out the two smaller Reinauer boats farther in), Gramma Lee T Moran, Laura K Moran, Margaret Moran, Marie J Turecamo, Cape Cod, Pati B Moran, and Miriam Moran.

Norwegian Sea: high, dry, and missing its wheels.

Catherine C Miller and company.

Mia Forte Elsa . . . must be nobility.

Linda Moran

All fotos in the past two weeks by Will Van Dorp.

Two related Youtubes . . . not mine.  Thanks to John van der Doe for pointing the way.

Start with this one and this story about a Rotterdam–Murmansk tow (with 44,000 hp of tug power) gone awry partly because of a difference between the captains and the insurers.

First, Smit-Lloyd 115 tows Takpull 750 in rough water.  The soundtrack reminds me of Dutch pop music of my parents wartime generation.

Second, if you can really indulge me . . . here’s another video that gives the English translation of that same music sung by (trans.) the Harborsingers. Great traditional Dutch costumes too.

Uh– . . .actually the fleet had already entered through the Narrows, but look just to the right of the Brooklyn-side pillar . . . like disembodied fingertips ready to pluck VZ’s strings . . .

a fleet of the air . . . Hornets and

Ospreys and a single

Dolphin.  I understand the importance of the color, but I think of a clownfish whenever I see a Dolphin.  And those streams of water . . . FireFighter is pumping them out its monitors.

Later . . . Philippine Sea gets

assisted into its berth

on Staten Island.  By the way, the summertime haze here exists in 92-degree heat.

Between the bow of CG 58 the fendering of Catherine Turecamo, there’s  . . . protection.  In my layperson’s terminology, I’d call it a sheet.  Does it have a more technical name?

Between Robbins Light and Brooklyn, that’s Campbell.

Yes, I must “get the hang” of video, but enjoy this snippet.  A shot from the shore battery can be heard at 9 seconds, and Iwo Jima‘s response . . . just after the puff of smoke . ..  around 16 seconds in.  I’d stationed myself such that for its first three shots, Iwo Jima was obscured by the bridge pillar.

Tomorrow before dawn .  . I’m headed up to New Hampshire .  . . back in a week or less.  No offense intended, but sometimes I must balance the sixth boro waters and shorelines with canoes, woods, beavers, porcupines, songbirds and songfrogs, fresh fish ….  the list could go on.  I’ll bring foto evidence.

On a happy note:  In May 2008, I lamented here the fact that the NYTIMES had nary a word about the fleet entering the city.  Today the top center foto was of Iwo Jima here.  Bravo the New York Times . . . maybe they’ll rename the paper as the “all six boros of NY Times.”

FireFighter at the Narrows, Fort Wadsworth side . . . rainbow effect of spray . . . must be doins’  … big stuff going on or about to . . . .

Waiting on the Fort Hamilton (Brooklyn)  side, I espy a huge shape some five or six miles off, here between FDNY’s not-yet-in-service 343 and the venerable Driftmaster.  Iwo Jima (Mississippi-built) has returned!  See fotos I took on board last year here.

The first fleet vessel through the Narrows was PC-4, Monsoon, Louisiana-built, commissioned in 1994, here passing Ellen McAllister.  Scroll through this link to see a sampling of  fotos of Monsoon‘s adventures.

Next visitor in was WMEC 909, Campbell, the sixth cutter to bear that name, here with helicopter above and USACE vessels all around, from left, Moritz, (I believe that’s the stern of Dobrin … barely visible), Driftmaster, and Gelberman.  Campbell’s homeport is Portsmouth, NH.  See a previous appearance of Campbell on this blog here… last foto).

Next in, sibling of Monsoon . . . was Squall, commissioned in same year and state.

As Iwo Jima approached the Verrazano Bridge, a gun salute from Fort Hamilton drew

Iwo Jima‘s response.  By the way, the bit of land on the lower left side of the foto above is Hendrick’s Reef, on which the Brooklyn pillar of the Verrazano Bridge stands, an island that from 1812 until 1960 housed Fort Lafayette.  I wonder which Hendrick that was.

Ellen McAllister followed Iwo Jima in.  Is that Catherine Turecamo over on Iwo Jima‘s port side?

Next in was DDG 95, destroyer James E. Williams, named for a sailor who served in both Korea and Vietnam.  Read about her namesake here.

Then it was FFG 45, frigate De Wert, named for a sailor who died in Korea in 1951.

And then Bath, Maine-built CG 58, Philippine Sea.

Closer up . . . I can’t identify the Coast Guard 47-footer other than 47315.  By the way, see this type vessel’s capabilities as filmed in the mouth of the Merrimack River in all its fury.  The Merrimack was my obsession during part of the 80s and all of the 90s.

I didn’t see where Miriam Moran assisted (probably up at the Hudson River passenger terminal) but a while later I caught her headed to home base as Laura K. was out to Red Hook for an assist.  Check out the two crew on the afterdeck.

Hmm . . . I wonder what the story is.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, “Government Ships 5″ is the short title;  a longer version is “Their crews and all those sixth-boro based supporters.”

Welcome to New York.

A century ago, a parade of ships featured the Cruiser Olympia, now in very real danger of being reefed.

Staten Island Live has an excellent schedule of events planned the next few days on Staten Island, where most of the fleet vessels are berthed.  See the schedule here.

Final note:  I plan to cross the Merrimack aka “merry mack” tomorrow headed north for some canoeing.  See foto here.  The Pow Wow flows into the Merrimack.

I call this a “water blog,” but usually avail myself only of salt water shots.  Below is what I saw from my bedroom window yesterday morning:  rainwater pool on roof beside my building.  Foto is obviously flipped, but the vent with round hole to the right serves as “portal” for at least three raccoons who cavort and sing after dark.  New York is wild.

Foreshortening . . . makes for some arresting shots:  here McAllister Responder, Franklin Reinauer, Jennifer Turecamo, and RTC 150 pushed by Meredith C. Reinauer enjoy much greater separation than appears.

Left to right here are:  Chemical Pioneer, Johann Jacob, and OOCL Busan.  I post this foto because it suggests that the forward portion of Chemical Pioneer and its stern seem mismatched.  Think about it . . . and I tell you the story below.

Foreshortening again . . .  plenty of searoom exists between NYK Constellation and OOCL Busan, but for some seconds, from my vantage point, I was getting nervous.

No comment on the frothiness in the center of this foto.  Notice the building on the tip of Manhattan between the red and green buoy.  That is 17 Battery Place, once the “footprint” for Moran Towing.  Starting on p. 273 of Tugboat:  The Moran Story by Eugene F. Moran and Louis Reid, there’s an incredible story about a Captain Daniel F. Anglim that dates back to the 1927.  In short, Dan had a naturally loud voice “even louder from having to yell against the wind” (pre-walkietalkie days) did dispatch from the 25th floor of that building down to the tugs waiting between Pier 2 and 4 on the Hudson.  I cannot imagine.  Looking for a good read:  Get The Moran Story!

Today several hundred feet of landfill separate 17 Battery Place from the nearest water.  See a foto of 17 Battery Place from that time here .  . second foto down.  I’d love to see a larger version.

Cape Melville bound for sea.  I love the name . . . that northeast corner of Australia.  In the background you see parts of the Brooklyn Bridge, Manhattan Bridge, and One Court Square, Queens’ and Long Island’s tallest building.  One court Square also appears in the second foto above.

That’s Adirondack coming around the side of City Pier A, the once and future dock for NYPD and FDNY?

Yes, this is a wild turkey in Battery Park, it looked totally indignant when I asked that he pose in front of  either the Terminal or one of the Homeland Security cars in the background .  Imagine that !!  But the location is inland about 100 feet with the Staten Island Ferry Terminal to the left and the Coast Guard station to the right.    Wild New York.

The Chemical Pioneer story:  in late May 1973, a Bath Iron Works container ship called Sea Witch bound for sea lost steering and collided with an anchored tanker called Esso Brussels, resulting in a deadly fire (15 deaths, 13 of them on Esso Brussels, loaded with Nigerian crude) and New York harbor oil spill.   Read the complete story here.    Later, the stern section of Sea Witch was grafted onto a new forward section.  For Sea Witch‘s original lines, click here;  she’s the second one down.

All fotos taken on May 20 by Will Van Dorp.

By the way . . . that turkey . . . she goes by the name Zelda;  be good to Zelda when you see her.

When I headed out this morning, blues as I had written about them here a quarter year ago had no place in my consciousness but tell me this:  were my eyes malfunctioning or is this not the most disarming set of blues ever painted onto a ship?  These blues set off Laura K. Moran‘s pure beet red.  And, as if that were not enough, a second

blue ship, different hue,  came along too, tailed by Margaret Moran.

Minerva tankers are typically black with the owl logo, unlike Minerva Joanna.   That’s Patapsco in the distance.

Aegir (436′ x 64′) is junior as container ships go, but check out the top of her load.

In from Sweden, maybe that’s where Joanna grew her disarming blues,

It’s a Caterpillar D6R.  Do we import these now?

Those blues really set off the colors and angles on Laura K.

Doesn’t Richmond Terrace here seem tropical?

What outatowner would imagine the shore off to the left of the foto lies within the confines of New York City?   Catch the Staten Island end of the Bayonne Bridge (my logo) off to the right side of the foto.

Is that port of registry this St. John’s?  Or this one?  Notice the confabulation on the stern portside?

Partner tug to Laura K. is Miriam, of course.  Oh, and it’s Tzoanna.

All fotos taken by Will Van Dorp, who was in a very good mood, in case you wonder.  Click here for squidoo’s thoughts on associations with the color blue, green red, orange . . .

Check out NYC:The Blog here.

See what Rotterdammer Fred Vloo and I have in common here, as pointed out by Rick “Old Salt.”  Thanks, Rick.

This is my version of Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a ...”.  Call this “Checking out Docks on a Hazy Morning,” the joy of which is finding the unexpected.  Like OSG Vision, here among the  giants.  The tug just astern Vision’s blue stacks is K-Sea Volunteer, air draft 114′ if my info is correct, making

Vision, docked here in Bayonne, NJ, the highest tug seat I’ve seen in the sixth boro!

Vision looks like a starship, and is as huge as one:  12000 hp!! and 153′ x 51′ x 26.’  Anyone know the air draft?

Find closer-up and clearer fotos of Vision from the fabulous Narragansett Bay Shipping site here, taken about a month ago.

James Turecamo and Zachery Reinauer passed by to

meet and greet (well, that’s interpretation, I know) also.  Ships in the distance are:  Horizon Discovery (ex-American Liberty, Sea-Land Liberty, Sea-Land Discovery, CSX Discovery… built by Sun Shipbuilding in Chester, PA in 1968) and Wallenius Wilhelmsen Fedora.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  OSG Vision‘s daily fuel consumption:  35 tons!

Socrates left the harbor under a golden sunset pulling an empty

Sugar Express;  they headed south from the Yonkers plant (to where?) for a refill.  Who can live the sweet life

without the stuff?  From Florida, as the reader suggests?

Stolt Perseverence, a parcel tanker built in Croatia in 2001, delivers assorted chemicals, escorted by James Turecamo and Marie J Turecamo (?).

I’ve no clue what these vital assorted chemicals might be, or what their journey is.

These mounds get me to work on time:  Express Marine hauls the coal into the PSEG Hudson Generating Station, which provides juice to the Northeast corridor trains.

West Virginia coal

gets Escorted into the sixth boro by this vessel.

Jill Jacob . . . moves global industrial life blood.

There’s so much that does NOT meet the eye and is NOT easily discovered about in/outflow of commodities in the boro.  Of course, petroleum products  and containers dominate, along with an occasional elixir of orange.  Some months back I posted my fantasy about sailing goods into the boro from the agricultural north.  Bowsprite reflects on overlapping ideas  here.

All fotos above were taken this week by Will Van Dorp.

The idea here comes from the “eyed but not seen until it’s noticed” department.  I noticed the Brooklyn church on the hill behind Linda Moran only recently.  I’ve no doubt I’d seen it many times before, but my glance never lingered there.  Now, I am unable to NOT see it.  It is the basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, OLPH, for short.    Between Linda and OLPH is the Brooklyn Army Terminal, designed by the legendary Cass Gilbert.

This got my wondering about other churches visibly prominently  from the sixth boro.    Like St. Michael’s in Sunset Park, Brooklyn.  I know some might find this heretical, but as a newbie in the sixth boro, I considered the possibility that the 200′ egg-tipped spire might be a minaret.

Just forward of Megan McAllister is St. Mary Star of the Sea in Bayonne, as seen from Richmond Terrace, Staten Island.

Just above Ellen McAllister‘s stacks, Our Lady of Mount Carmel is mostly obscured here by the IMTT tanks.

St Peter’s in New Brighton, Staten Island can’t be missed.

Just astern of Kristy Ann Reinauer, St Patrick’s in Elizabeth, New Jersey, has two spires.  The single white spire to the right of the courthouse tops First Presbyterian on Broad Street in Elizabeth, a congregation going back to 1664.

From this 2007 foto, it’s Riverside

Church in Manhattan.  In the foto above, left to right:  Dorothy Elizabeth, Patapsco, Lucy Reinauer, and unknown.  Can anyone identify this Moran boat below?  Answer below.

And since I’m asking, here’s a church along the Brooklyn side of East River aka Easy River, taken in 2007, I cannot identify.  Anyone help?

If you wish to add other church landmarks, let me know.

All fotos here, Will Van Dorp.

Moran boat below Riverside Church is Paul T. Moran, answer thanks to Allen Baker.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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