You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Maersk’ tag.

Unrelated but priority . . . don’t know if this is real:  Colvin schooner on beach for sale for $15000

I quote from gcaptain:  “According to AP Moller, the parent company of Maersk Lines, a single 20-foot vessel container on average can hold about 48,000 bananas. In theory then, Emma Maersk is capable of holding nearly 528 million bananas [aka 11,000 teu] in a single voyage – enough to give every person in Europe or North America a banana for breakfast.”    So I wondered . . . if Emma and sisters carry that number of bananas, then

CMA CGM White Shark = 243 million bananas,

Ital Lirica – 244.3,

Port Said – 82.03 . . . .   and

MSC Linzie – 242.3

There you have it, a new measure for container ships, the banana.  It’s right out there waiting to catch on  . .  like smoots, donkeypower, helens, and  hedons.

All fotos recently by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to gcaptain for bringing up the banana idea.  Now would those be Cavendish bananas, plantains, or something else?

Maersk is the answer to yesterday’s question . . .  what shipping line dominated the sixth boro the other day?  Well, even if you live inland, you see their logo on shipping containers, whether they be stacked, pulled by Kenworths and congesting the highway, or pulled down the rails.

Maersk Bristol waited off St. George (note this foto of an icy Bristol from a year ago) while Maersk

Carolina steamed westbound on the KVK, and

Maersk Kentucky entered the approaches to the Narrows.  I caught this foto a half hour after the top two.

Maersk is a leviathan of shipping;  they may be the world’s largest shipper of containers, but that is only a small part of what they do.  Here’s Carolina earlier this year,

Denpasar,

Kokura,

Kalamata,

Virginia

Carolina again,

Montana  . . .

all with the same first name and logo.  Know how long the company’s had the logo?

Over a century, according to this story about Captain P. M. Møller.  Imagine Maersk’s first vessel, SS Laura?  See here.

Can you guess an additional five states in the US-flagged Maersk subsidiary?  Answer here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

As Florida’s cutterhead chews the harbor bottom away at the rate of 43,200 revolutions per day … in ideal conditions of teeth staying permanently sharp, vessels of all provenances and sizes  sashay in and out and around.   By New York standards, Maersk Kokura is large, at 1040′ loa x 138′ beam, and its keel mere feet above Florida‘s anchor line.

What drew my attention was the number of tugs:  three.

Amy C McAllister and Maurania III on starboard, and

outa-towner Resolute on port.

I’ve no numbers on clearance below the Bayonne to the uppermost portions of Kokura.  Anyone?

Fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Underwater Halloween party . . .

Thomas J. Brown passes a Penguin on the way to the yard, westbound on the KVK.

Thomas J. (Gladding-Hearn 1962) is a classic.  At this link is an account of a day in the life of Thomas J crew, as told by John Soltes.  Penguin is less than three years old, made in China.

Morro Bay in springtime contrasts sharply with her image three months back, icebreaking on the upper Hudson.

Anyone know the year 140′ Morro Bay was launched?

Odin may not be a classic, but she is certainly unique, a bit of  exotic

technology in the harbor.  The 1982 tug is one of my favorites.

Zodiac PLUS Irish Sea (ex-Clipper, 1969).

The zodiac seemed to be doing drills off Morro Bay.

Scott C dates from 2007.

Here Scott C crosses Cape Cod, a staple of shortseashipping in the sixth boro.  In the link on shortsea… previous sentence, you are treated to bowsprite’s delightful eutopic visions for humanizing the sixth boro, unlike the dytopic view Alexis Rockman projects as a cautionary tale.

Closing shot:  a mystery tug, place and fotografer to be disclosed soon.

All fotos (almost) here by Will Van Dorp, in the past week.

Just in case you haven’t guessed, tugster rides the tour  bus into the outskirts of Talltalesville sometimes . . . and in his offices along the KVK is reputed to converse with historical personages (more on this at end of post) and  . . . birds.  Like earlier this week, I was just comparing Easter dinner notes with Merg, one of my favorite red-breasted mergansers, and the conversation turned toward olives , my favorites, pitted kalamatas.  Did I say this “office” is near Snug Harbor, a place ghosts reputedly inhabit?  In this link see the last one third for ghosts.

When I noticed Merg’s crest was a bit wilder than a few minutes before,  I followed its line of sight and

I understood.  Shape and scale were both formidable.

Our conversation interrupted, Merg veered to starboard

as this leviathan followed.

Enough already, croaked Merg, heading for the east.

And if the immensity of the blue vessel were not enough, from alongbehind appeared . . . is it Laura K?

That was it for Merg, who dove.  Oh, the great blue container ship is Maersk Kalamata, the closest vessel to 1000′ loa I’ve seen in boro 6 in a bit.  Note Robbins Reef light just forward of the bow.

Marginally related:  the foto below dates from March 2, 2010 in the KVK.  I thought it was a seal.  I saw something (dark shape just to the left of bubbles) swim quite fast just below the surface, but now I’m thinking it might be a dolphin.  Anyone weigh in?  I know there’s not much fotografic clue here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Personages:  A few weeks ago, while I was relaxing on the dock aka my “office” in front of Sailor’s Snug Harbor, an older man ambled down the stairs and walked over to me.  I watch my back and front, so paid attention for awhile.  When he avoided eye contact  and seemed harmless and as fixated on the water as I was, I went back to shooting what passed.  After a few minutes, he waved and said, Foto, foto,”  while pointing to himself.  No matter what I said or asked, all he said was “foto foto,” so I figured why not and snapped his picture.  When I asked his name, he handed me a pizza menu.  Strange, given that he was Asian and I would swear he was Ho Chi Minh or at least his body-double recently.  By the way, HCM lived in Manhattan and Brooklyn between 1912 and 1918 after having worked in the galley of a ship a few years.)    I wouldn’t make this up.  So if that was you, get in touch and I’ll send the foto foto.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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