You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Laura K. Moran’ tag.

Here was a post I did four years ago.  Scroll through and the second image from last is an icebreaking run I did with Cornell in the Kingston NY area.  Here were my posts Ice 2 and the first Ice.

Below . . . a foto from Gerard Thornton showing Gary Nelson on Gage Paul Thornton.  Gary seems to be keeping relatively good humor in spite of the cold.

0aaaaaai1

Gulf Dawn returns a dredge scow to the AK.

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See the icicles on an anchor which less than a month ago was splashed with tropical water.

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Margaret and Laura K. Moran assist Valle Azzurra in from sea.

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McAllister Sisters heads upriver with

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RTC 60 and –I’m speculating– lots of heating oil for New York state homes.

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McAllister Girls –here passing Sassafras–is a boat I haven’t seen in a while.

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Thanks to Gerard Thornton for the first foto;  all others by Will Van Dorp, who believes that one reason to put up such cold fotos  is so that we can look back in July and feel delightfully cooled by these images.

Here was 3 in the series.  The sixth boro is indeed a huge fuel transfer port, and I need to make a more concerted effort to learn which transfers are imports and which . . . exports.  Meanwhile, a look at the variety of vessels involved in just a few days shows Energy Century,

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Aurora N with Crystal Cutler on the far side of a fuel barge in the distance,

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Trans Trader,

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Zachery Reinauer,

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Patrick Sky passing the bow of Summit Europe,

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and finally, passing a Laura K. Moran docking SCF Pechora, it’s Diane B with barge John Blanche.

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Cold and snow do not slow this trade; in fact, it’s when the temperature drops that this trade speeds up.

OK . . . I fail here.  Which Moran and which McAllister are those in the Sunday morning chop?

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Quick post:  Shelby 1978.

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Evening Tide 1970.

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Jay Michael 1980 doing a re-enactment of my December 15, 2012 post here (scroll to third foto).

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Long time no see . . . Superior Service 1981.

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North Sea 1982.

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Laura K. Moran 2008.

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Resolute 1975 and Discovery Coast 2012.

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All fotos taken in April by Will Van Dorp, who’s feeling it’s significant that so many of these are stern shots . . .  i.e., I’m struggling to keep up today.

Here was the first of this series, from over four years ago.  And what’s this?  whose wake prints?

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Answer?  It’s the flotilla assisting Hanjin San Francisco into Port Elizabeth.  Four months ago I caught San Fran outbound . . . here . . . scroll through.

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Let’s do an anatomy of wakes on a curve called Bergen Point.  That’s Marion Moran on the stern quarter, a New Jersey State Police boat overtaking on the port side.  Click here to see a now/then foto of Shooters, the island just beyond the container vessel.

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Marion clings, presses while moving “sideways” through the water.

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Laura K passes.

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In the same general time frame, surveyboat Michele Jeanne

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and lube tanker Emma Miller scribe the surface with their own signature, as

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does Ellen McAllister and as

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a commingling with

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Catherine Turecamo.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Such great names on steel vessels that . . . ply our waters

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Indefatigable vessels like   Hyundai Grace, which left Shanghai on 6 February, entered the Narrows on 2 March–when I got these shots–and by 1 April will

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be back in Korea!  And what bright orange tanker could ever carry claim for being stealthy . . .

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this one with a stack logo like this wedge.

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I’m starting to get a hankering to travel . . . to follow FSL Tokyo out the Narrows,

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drawn by places like these . . . Handytankersmarvel of Majuro!

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While I still have the stamina, I’m going to put my gallivant shoes on and  follow Hellas Endurance.

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I’m especially intrigued by this one . . . Grande Guinea is a Grimaldi Line RORO, this one named for a sub-Saharan city whose history is linked to that of Timbuktu, a place until recently I’d always hoped to get to, a place that later served as namesake for a coin.

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I’m not sure when next I’ll post.  All fotos in the past month by Will Van Dorp.

Although quite common for tugboats and other smaller craft, New York is a rare place of registry in large vessels today.  Horizon Trader belongs to the same aging Jones Act fleet as Producer, Navigator, Challenger, . . . Crusader now scrapped.

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I’m way out of my depth in bringing up the Jones Act, a set of statutes regulating maritime commerce dating from 1920 sponsored by Senator Wesley Livsey Jones.  But here is a fact:  35 years old is the average fleet age of Horizon’s container vessels . . . a large if not the largest Jones Act carrier.  That compares with 12 years  . . . for the international container vessel fleet.  Source for these ages is here.

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As an untrained observer of the industry, I can state that Horizon Trader looks all of her 40 years, and again . .  as a fervent but unconnected news consumer, I’ve heard/read nothing that blemishes their safety record.

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And here’s the newest development . . . Horizon will cease their commerce through New York, substituting Philly instead.

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Technically Trader is a Type C6-S-85a designed for Farrell Lines by George G. Sharp, a firm with a stellar list of vessels to its name.

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Enjoy the 40-year-old details.   I’d love to hear from someone who’d been onboard.

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She looks small beside Laura K. Moran.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Wow . . . it’s been six years exactly since I last used this title.   Here’s Friday morning before work, and

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by Saturday Mare Pacific has moved to the deepwater anchorage until the flood spins her outbound.

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Noises of heavy chain directed my attention here, and I noticed the angle and scope had changed.

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Exhaust from the stack and swirls out behind the wheel caused these developments and

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then . . . as chain rattled, this weighing was not unexpected.

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Nor was this rinse water to dislodge

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clods of sixth boro bottom.

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With no perceptible engine noise (I was about a quarter mile away), Mare Pacific eased out, if only to re-anchor and hang with Silver Soul, High Enterprise, and others off Long Beach, NY.  Where she will load her next lake of rock juice remains to be seen.   See her previous stops here.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

The glimpse I caught while crossing westbound on the Verrazano Bridge told me to head for Fort Wadsworth:  fog with defined geographical boundaries lay at least 175′ deep over the waters’ surface at the Narrows.  Once standing on the overlook at the fort, the stacks of  two vessels (l to r) Stuttgart Express and Celebrity Summit seemed not unlike the sails of two submarines, sub-fogs in this case.

Celebrity Summit was crawling forward bellowing like a lost bovine and

as it sank deeper, left a distinct wake.

When I say geographical boundaries, I mean dynamic ones, and they expanded upward as I watched.

Keeping watch over this shifting masses with me were the previously mentioned ‘scapegoats, the ones minding the grassroots, poison ivy roots,  . . . any sorts of roots on the slopes near the Fort.

After convincing the watchers that I was no more interested in their political predictions as in anyone else’s,  the spokesgoat suggested I follow Celebrity Summit‘s path to the stable, as he phrased it.

And this seemed as good a location as available.  Ongoing bellowings from the vessel confirmed my choice.

Celebrity Summit moves stern first into BCLCT.

The rising sun began to cut through the fog and project a golden sheen onto the low clouds lying on the waters of the Upper Bay.

Pegasus (last seen here last week) makes for the North River . . . taking the Celebrity Summit‘s bow.   Here’s a foto of Celebrity Summit sans fog and post-Irene.

Guiding Summit through much of her voyage through the fog is Laura K. Moran (I believe).

All fotos yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

Some recognize their “heroes of the harbor,” and that’s a great thing.  I’d like to offer my list of “paladins of the port waters,”  honoring all those who work on the sixth boro and adjoining waters, be they partially permanent or totally transient visitors of our great port.

Honorees change constantly.  A recent survey of those mariners include crew of Indonesian-flagged High Seas, a vessel previously here under the name Pacific Turquoise.

Add in Yorktown, currently in town employing shipyard workers after

a mishap on the Great Lakes.

Kudos to this unidentified Moran boat moving containers around the harbor as they should be moved  with much great frequency.

I think it’s Brendan, but the Lady on the other side of the barge is not talking.

Here’s to the hundreds of working mariners and shore crews represented by Carnival Miracle, Emma Miller, and the unidentified barges here.

Hats off to the crew of Natalia McDevitt, which I’ve never seen here before.

Let’s hear it for the crews of Laura K and the unidentified tanker off her starboard, now headed to points south and east.

And a salute to crews who might rescue you in case of mishaps on the waters.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who thanks you for checking his list.

Pioneer headed southwest,  then

west.

and Clipper City taking her stern.

Laura K Moran takes the stern of an Offshore Sailing School boat.

A small sloop appears to go head-t0-head with Meriom Topaz and does the same with

Americas Spirit, as the tanker is lightered and provisioned.

And finally .  . is the green cata-schooner passing off the stern of Comet really Heron, which I last saw in Puerto Rico here (last foto)?

Here she tacks to the east just north of the Verrazano.  And Saturday night I spotted her again passing southbound through Hell Gate.

I hope to have more exciting autumn sail soon.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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