You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Kimberly Turecamo’ tag.

Here was the first time I used this title, which clearly needs to be used again.

Let me start here at 13:38.  Note from far to near, or black hull to black hull . . . Cartagena, Four Sky with Lee T Moran, Red Hook, and Genco Knight.

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Twin Tube slides through the opening between Bow Kiso and Genco Knight.

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Even the bow of Genco Knight is crowded as their vessel prepares to dock and resupply the salt depot.

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Kimberly Turecamo works the bulk carrier’s stern as Evening Star passes with B. No. 250.

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Add McAllister Girls in the foreground and Ellen McAllister in the distance against the blue hull, which will appear a bit later.

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McCrews heads westbound and Four Sky now seems to be doing the same.

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Are you out of breath yet?  Only 10 minutes has elapsed.

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Linehandler 1 cruises blithely through it, supremely self-assured.

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Cheyenne adds color.

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Another line handler boat scouts out the set up . . . as a new blue hull arrives from the west, as

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. .  . does Charles D. McAllister.

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Crew on the blue hull–Nord Observer–stows lines as they head for tropical heat, escorted

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by Catherine Turecamo although

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at the turn on the Con Hook range they meet Mare Pacific heading in with Joan Turecamo and Margaret  Moran.  At this point . . .

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14:12 . . .  the mergansers decided to hightail it . . . or at least follow their crests.  And I hadn’t even turned around yet to see the congestion on land behind me.

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All these photos in a very short time by Will Van Dorp.

My thanks to Brian DeForest and Atlantic Salt, whom Genco Knight was arriving to restock.

Here was a post about a dense traffic day as well as a busy day.

The link here may show the first glimpse I had of Balder.  Let me share my getting better acquainted, but first . . . the foto below I took 13 months ago.  Note the different colors of salt, reflecting

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different provenances, as explained in Ian Frazier’s New Yorker article below.  Buy a copy to get the rest of the story.

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Without this vessel, all of us who drive the roads or walks the sidewalks and streets within the metropolis surrounding the sixth boro would be at greater risk of slipping and crashing.  Framed that way, Balder could not be better named.   Here’s what Kimberly Turecamo looks like from Balder‘s bridge.

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On the far side of the channel, that’s Dace.

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Here’s what has come forth from Balder‘s belly, a bit of the Atacama Desert on the KVK.   Huge tractors load the trucks that come to a highway department near you today.

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This 246′ arm, reaching nearly to Richmond Terrace, offloads at the relatively slow rate of 8oo tons per hour.

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And here’s the hold just emptied, one hold of five.  Notice the ladders and the tracks at the base of the hold.

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Click here to see the unloading machinery in action.

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Navel, perhaps?

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Here’s what gets even the last pound making up the nearly 50,000-ton payload onto the salt dock.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt and the Balder crew for the tour.

Here was 8.

Do you recognize these vessels?  At the moment I write this, both are working together to escort in NYK Meteor.

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In the drydock earlier this year . . . Joan Turecamo and the other?

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This one is unmistakeable.  A year ago she was preparing to steam all night inside the sixth boro to ride out the storm.

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Click here for a foto of her in late October last year after Sandy had punished some more than others.

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From the land side, you can see some of the work recently done.

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And here from the dry side of the first shot . . .  it’s Kimberly  Turecamo and Joan.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It has been over six years since I first used this title, yet a bridge appears as header for every post.  And just in case you’re wondering, I will keep that version of the header no matter what gets announced the day after tomorrow.    The VZ Bridge is our Arc de Triomphe.  An April morning in 2008 I caught this foto of the QM2 arriving here for the first time.  Foto taken from the northwest (NW) side of the Narrows.

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Each year representatives of the fleet pass –here USS Nitze–under, with added moisture added by FDNY.   Foto from the SE.

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Dozens of vessels pass beneath the structure daily.  I recall how thrilled I was to drive my boat underneath  . . . in 2003, as I was moving it to the Great Lakes and myself into the sixth boro.  Aside from its symbolic and logistical value, the VZ is beautiful–here seen from the NE.

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It’s most beautiful at dawn.

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But the other morning as I caught this, I wonder why the bridgegreen version of navygray was chosen as its color.  I think of the Golden Gate, the Purple People Bridge, the yellow bridges of Pittsburgh.

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What prompts this post is a sight I saw from the SE a few weeks ago . . . what looked first like a high-hanging fruit hanging west of the Brooklynside tower.  I wondered if it’d always been there but somehow I’d missed it.

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Zooming in, though, I saw it was a paint crew, at least five painters.  Putting on camouflage or daubing antirust?

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Maybe preparing to change the color depending on the results of a horse race?

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Or prepping for a new VZ Bridge color in honor of the bridge’s jubilee . .  in about a year and a half?

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Happy May Day .  . all fotos by Will Van Dorp.   Anyone know why the official spelling of the bridge does not match that of its namesake?

Gramma Lee T Moran, 2002

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Jay Mchael and Mister Jim,  1980 and 1982

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Mister T, 2001

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Mister T again

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Brandywine and Viking, 2006 and 1976

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Kimberly Turecamo, 1980

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Red Hook (a first on this blog) and Severn, 2013 and 2008

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B. Franklin Reinauer, 2012

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Shelby Rose, 1963

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Hubert Bays, 2002.

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All fotos taken in the past week by Will Van Dorp.

Taken about 10 days ago . ..  Lyman headed south towing Sea Shuttle.

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Lyman used to sport a red star on its stack.

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Harry McNeal (1965) escorts Clyde, whose vintage I don’t know.  Here’s a very similar scene (foto 4)  from almost four years ago.

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Atlantic Coast dates from 2007.

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Perennial “repeater” on this blog, Gramma Lee T Moran, waiting to retrieve the pilot.

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34-year-old Emerald Coast used to answer to the name Maggie Swann.

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Calusa Coast first appeared here six and a half years ago.

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Jill Reinauer and Kimberly Turecamo westbound in morning light.

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As I went into work this morning, there was no more than 10 minutes of spectacular dawn light, before the clouds dulled it.

Think of the sixth boro as a destination/origin as well as a crossroads.  WMEC-905 Spencer anchored in that point of convergence as of midday.

In points not far from Spencer and the Statue, cargo destined for/originating in this port was moving only if it could transfer in the harbor, petroleum liquid, like here, congress happened between barges powered by Pati T Moran and Sassafras as Meagan Ann passes by with a scow.  For debris?

Kimberly Turecamo stands by with Long Island itself . . . well,  a fuel barge by that name. The spirit is greatly willing to move fuel to faltering consumers on the shore, but the distribution system is broken, for now.

Nicole Leigh Reinauer awaits the green light.

St Andrews with barge on this side and Kimberly Poling on the other . . . like thirsty twins on their mother, Glory Express.

Traversing the sixth boro . . .  Marion Moran pushes LaFarge barge Adelaide to points south.

Supply boat ABC-1 passes tanker Favola.

Diane B waits with a barge.  A problem is that debris like blowaway and sunken containers may lurk unseen at the transfer docks.

Doris Moran, with another LaFarge barge, makes a power turn from the North River into the East River.

A cluster of DonJon vessels–tugs Mary Alice, Thomas D. Witte, and Brian Nicholas–attend to crane barges Columbia NY and Raritan Bay on some “unwatering” project just west of the Battery Coast Guard station.

Transiting the sixth boro from south to North is Apollo Bulker.  More fotos of her later.  She may be headed to Albany.

Ken’s Booming & Boat Service tug Durham passes the “seeing boat” Circle Line Manhattan.

Over by the Brooklyn Navy Yard, schooner Lynx heads for the Sound, past an East River ferry.

And–this just in–as of 1900 hrs tonight, APL Sardonyx became the first container ship to enter Port Elizabeth,

escorted in by McAllister Sisters and Barbara McAllister.   Interestingly, see the foto here of her as one of the first into the port post-Irene!!  Here’s another shot almost exactly two years ago of  APL Sardonyx.

And a bit later, APL Coral came in, escorted by  Elizabeth and Ellen McAllister.

Outside the Narrows waits USS Wasp, recently here five months ago for Fleet Week.   A pulse has been re-established.

I am mindful that many residents of the area are hurting.  My prayers go out for relief for them soon.  Folks who suffered through post-Katrina are also sending along their prayers and encouragement, their solidarity with Sandy-afflicted.

We went through a “reboot” here 14 months ago, but this one is going to be much tougher.

x

Here’s 3.

Cape Washington left today, following in the wake of Lia.  Zim Beijing came in;  I’m guessing “my” Bebedouro will leave soon, and the pace of ins-outs is such that I have to content myself seeing in on AIS.

Although I’m intrigued with names and itineraries like OOCL Oakland and

Zim Qingdao back here yesterday,

traffic longterm runs together and

goes out of focus and even

blurs.

For a moment, that is.  HS Livingstone entered the harbor Saturday morning, and by midmorning Sunday, it’s off Atlantic City making for Baltimore.

In

in

inbound, then outbound  .  . .

I wonder about the blur for the mariner of these global box vessels.  Here’s a question I have insufficient info to answer:  Pick a year like 1940, and the number of dockworkers that year per ton of cargo transferred between ship and shore.  Now compare the tonnage of freight handled on the docks of NYC in 1940 and 2012 and thereby calculate how many dockworkers would be needed in 2012 using the 1940 dockworker/ton rate.  And why?  Check out this article in today’s NYTimes called “…Rise of the Machines.”

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Before dawn the day of the race, daily port activities carried on:  Atlantic Niyala awaited load shift in Red Hook.

Celebrity Summit arrived from sea for some port time here assisted by  Kimberly Turecamo (?).

Scott Turecamo awaited some rehab

at Caddell’s.

As passengers debarked to starboard, equipment received attention to port.  I’m not sure what all is happening over on the port side here.

Up at the Manhattan passenger terminal Veendam received Tuckahoe  attention to port as well as passengers transferred from ship to island.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who heads for the Roundup tomorrow.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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Seth Tane American Painting

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Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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