You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘K-Sea’ tag.

Check out the name plate . . . Davis Sea.  Yup, it’s THAT Davis Sea as captured less than a week ago by John Skelson.  Two months ago, I got a foto of Davis Sea looking like this (third foto down).

And from Pam Hepburn, THIS is what I spotted alongside Linda G, back in mid-February.  It’s a Kori pontoon marsh buggy, working here along the Kills.

Here back at the dock, it’s transitioning from barge to terrafirma, not terra marsha.

I don’t generally go to the water to watch birds, but you can’t hang along the water long without seeing all manner of birds, solo or

in multiples or even

exponentials.  Here’s an old post about these floating featured things.  Of course, birds aren’t the only animals I see.  How about ponies

like this one?  And maybe here’s the rider

that chose to venture out solo.

And alien orbs . . . with Scott Turecamo and a turbine in the distance . . .

And then there’s HarvestDome, an ethereal orb coming to the waters this summer.  And if you want to contribute to getting this completed and afloat, click here.

Click here and here for stories on a huge piece of flotsam currently on the western Indian Ocean.

And finally, from the Argus-eyed bowsprite, what’s this?  This sailboat  . . . is it cargo or has this creative captain traded in the usual orange lifeboat for a higher-performance ride back to terra firma for a little déjeuner sur l’herbe a la Manet  should it be desired?

Happy March!  And seriously, consider chipping in some dinars or ducats to help float Harvest Dome this summer.  The link is here.

aka Naismith gear.  And where is this industrial

setting?

At, in, or  on  Stolt Invention.  And what is Stolt Invention, you might wonder?

She’s a parcel tanker and midday today she left the sixth boro bound for sea, bound for some scrimmage somewhere in mid-ocean somewhere.  Yes, that’s Siberian Sea (1980, ex-Heidi E. Roehrig, Matthew, Star Avjet)  , but she seems to lack the Naismith gear.  

I wonder if all the NYK Stolt tankers have hoops?  Might the entire global fleet be divided into leagues?  Is there a draft?  Are rendezvous points established in mid-ocean for competitions?

Be on the lookout for a basketball court with cargo capacity coming your way soon.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  Read “deepwater writing”‘s description of a ship he visited recently in “ship envy.”  Along with quite interesting links, he includes great details about his tour of a Norwegian vessel that featured spacious quarters, a gyn, and a room for karaoke and music.

Unrelated:  For a 19-minute Fred Vloo video of Rotterdam harbor, showing a wide variety of vessels, click here.

Thanks to Pat Folan of Pelican Passage . . . a new Cutler boat?  See another foto at the end of the post.

Also thanks to Pat, a new Vane Brothers boat . . . Quantico Creek.  See fotos of the launch of the 3000 hp tug here.

A fairly new Wilmington Towing vessel, Capt Harry, brother of Sonie.

Odin, seen here many times before

Marion C. Bouchard, 1979 built.

Bohemia, a 4200 hp Vane boat.

And thanks to east river, the tiniest ATB power unit towing barge Massachusetts . . .


Clearly not a tug, but I wonder if anyone can identify this self-described Black Pearl . . . .

Finally, as promised, another view of the first vessel:  Crystal Cutler, a 1600ish hp newbuild rcently arrived in the sixth boro.  Welcome!

For more of Pat’s great fotos, click here.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

See you at the MWA 2010 Waterfront Conference on Tuesday.    For details, click the icon on left side of page.

9 a.m.  ... Wanderbird coming through the Gate?  (Remember… doubleclick enlarges.)

Well, I knew it wasn’t, given all that capacity up forward.

but a little over half an hour later, she wandered in.  Wanderbird was built for capacity, too, and from 1963 when the Jaczon family launched her, until 1990, she fished.  Here’s a link for another Jaczon beam trawler operating out of Scheveningen  (and you should hear me pronounce that town name in my best dialect).

The bridges making up this immediate  entry to the Gate are (farther and pink)  the Hell Gate Bridge and

the RFK.

Solomon Sea (ex-Brandon Roehrig) with its string of scows led

the way through.

The candy-striped stacks belong to Big Allis

over beyond Roosevelt Island in Ravenswood, Queens.

As I’m seeking to confirm, Wanderbird sips fuel . . . five gallons/hour!   Click here and here to see  youtube of  six-cylinder diesels by the same manufacturer, Industrie.

More on Wanderbird soon.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Part 1 of this series looked like this.  Now more.

Madeline, 2008

Duty, 2006

Lindsey, 1989

Brandywine, 2006

More Lindsey

More Duty.

More Madeline.

More Brandywine, and Amberjack and Bold.

Of course Brandywine ranges far and wide, and these days, maybe so does Inland Sea heading south here from the Ben Franklin Bridge.

All fotos last week by Will Van Dorp.

(Note:  Doubleclick enlarges all fotos)

What’s this . . . fiddling and dancing and taking shade near

Lower Manhattan, an intriguing hideaway in that bustling and ranted-about geography?

And this . . . same location, but doesn’t that suggest two folks standing near the forward railing

on a tug “made to” the 79 Barge, which

moves other folks as well, here photographing the Brooklyn Bridge at golden hour, as

crew stands lookout, watching two tugs–Volunteer and W. O. Decker–heading east on the river of the same name . . .

… uh . . . this meandering string started out as a question.  Forget the question, please.  And I hope you get a sense of places of peace in the bestirred land masses around the sixth boro.

Here’s the same tug and barge, clearly lashed, at Pier 6 in the new Brooklyn Bridge Park, with a late August sun setting behind the house.  You can catch Pegasus and Lehigh Valley Barge #79 at that location until Tuesday, August 31 …  and at points along the Hudson for the next 16 days after that.

After sunset . . . Pegasus heads over to homebase in Jersey City.  Hey . . . tugs and crews need sleep.

Check out bowsprite’s magical drawings of the duo here.

All fotos here taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but fascinating:  Marie’s Tide & Current Taxi has been busy this month:

August 9: Coney Island Creek, with Debbie Tuch and me

August 10:  Gowanus Canal

August 12:  Staten Island “graveyard of ships

August 15:  Shooter’s Island

August 22:  “mystery tour”

Not a tug . . .  Blount-built Sailor (1977) delivers lubricants to suezmax crude carrier  Cape Bowen. A sixth-boro Blount boat is Twin Tube.  Sailor and Twin Tube–now that’s an evocative set of names– have similar hulls but houses at opposite ends.  But have you guessed the answer to the ponderable at the end of the post a few days back?

Also not a tug:  fragile lightship Barnegat, here on the mud in North Camden.

Still not a tug:  SS United States.  Don’t the lines suggest the throat pleats of a rorqual?  Got some names of tug companies common in the Delaware but not depicted here the past few days?

Bouchard is one.  Morton IV is a regular in the sixth boro, here approaching the Commodore Barry Bridge.

K-Sea is another.  I’m not sure why Coral Sea lies beside Arthur W Radford here in the Navy Yard.

And then there’s Penn Maritime . . .  here’s Amberjack.  Penn specializes in transporting heated asphalt.

But Vane Brothers is ubiquitous.  Here’s Pokomoke, and

Patuxent,

Bohemia,

Charles Hughes, and

Roanoke.  Two other Vane boats lay in the Schuykill, but too close to Sunoco to risk taking a foto.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, but again special thanks to Jeff Schurr and John Curdy.

You might wonder what’s happening in the sixth boro.  Me too.  I need to have a look, although I’ve really enjoyed Pelican Passage‘s  shots these weeks.  See some  fireworks here.  As for me, it’s prime gallivant season the next few weeks.  See you on the go.

News flash:  unrelated . . . is it true that a duck nursery has been located inside Cornell‘s bow pudding?  Don’t you feel cooled just looking at this January foto?

Delicious cold chocolate chunk ice cream . . .

or not!

Dredge spoils from the KVK.  Baltic Sea just happened to pass by on the far side of the scow.

Fotos by Will Van Dorp.

First, as a followup to Fleet Week, check what stealthy vessel Mitch  (Newtown Pentacle’s) caught over by the Sound end of the East River here.  It’s the m-ship aka M80 stiletto, a quintmaran . . . by my count.

My first time to see Maurania III.

Built in 2004.  Anyone seen where Rosemary‘s been assigned these days?

Irish Sea (ex-Clipper) 1969.

The two Hornbeck boats are Erie Service (nearer) and Eagle Service.  Tanker is Minerva Anna, and the dredge is 996 with an assemblage of small service boats along the starboard side.

Sassafras bunkers Ambassador Bridge.  In the lower right, the yellow machines are called straddlers aka container-haulers.  With so many parked there, I guess Port Elizabeth was quite slow Thursday afternoon.  Here’s a youtube of a straddler in action;  lots more to the right there.

A slow day …?  From left, Nicole Leigh Reinauer, Kristy Ann Reinauer, (I can’t make out the two smaller Reinauer boats farther in), Gramma Lee T Moran, Laura K Moran, Margaret Moran, Marie J Turecamo, Cape Cod, Pati B Moran, and Miriam Moran.

Norwegian Sea: high, dry, and missing its wheels.

Catherine C Miller and company.

Mia Forte Elsa . . . must be nobility.

Linda Moran

All fotos in the past two weeks by Will Van Dorp.

Two related Youtubes . . . not mine.  Thanks to John van der Doe for pointing the way.

Start with this one and this story about a Rotterdam–Murmansk tow (with 44,000 hp of tug power) gone awry partly because of a difference between the captains and the insurers.

First, Smit-Lloyd 115 tows Takpull 750 in rough water.  The soundtrack reminds me of Dutch pop music of my parents wartime generation.

Second, if you can really indulge me . . . here’s another video that gives the English translation of that same music sung by (trans.) the Harborsingers. Great traditional Dutch costumes too.

. . . er “air” and “water.”       But with the Earth & Fire post last week, this had to appear, right?

Thanks to the tentatively definitive compendium on “schooner identification in the sixth boro,” I can without a doubt call the leftmost vessel Imagine and the rightmost Adirondack.  And for outatowners, that’s Hoboken in the background.

Just a glimpse of the spoon-bowed, yellow-sailed schooner raises my spirits from dragging along May’s rocks to June’s breeziness.

Notice how the profile of Escape Plan gets echoed here in the upper reaches of North Sea.

With the June breezes and right attention, even if just for a few moments, all my cares take wing and fly away . . .  propelling my spirit like a little sloop dallying about the start of the North River.

Seeing a yellow hulled sailboat, like Mamzel, powering upriver, one of many migrating mostly northward at season’s start conjures up one thought . . .  sailing . . . you’re doing it wrong.

Clipper City . . . sailing, almost doing it right, but

these ones got it:  Pride of Baltimore, Imagine, and Adirondack . . . back in 2008, air moving them through the water.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s an “erin wadder” post from last fall;  more soon.

And don’t forget the caption contest here . . . I’ve got some good entries but want some more.  Send’em in, please.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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