You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Hurricane Sandy’ tag.

John B.   three weeks after coming ashore.  Tethered . . . like an rogue beast.

Tagged . . . like a common railroad boxcar.

Examined by a scissor lift.

Quarantined and sequestered by yellow boom in her element and

orange pole and police tape ashore . . .

Her cavities and ducts probed, cathetered, and pumped out . . .

Prospects do indeed look grim for John B.  . . .  

her fate watched from the deep side.

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Since Ft Wadsworth’s still closed to the public, I’ve no news about the ‘scapegoats there. Anyone have word?

A friend took these from her apartment on the dates specified.  This one was October 27, looking across Shorefront Parkway in Queens . . . yes this is NYC.  Notice the edge of an adjacent building along the left side of the foto, the walls of the handball courts “behind” the boardwalk, the “western” tip of Long Beach on the leftside horizon, and the street lights.

Dusk October 29.

Same location, midday October 30.  Since that time, heavy machinery has moved in to break up and cart away the sections of boardwalk.  I hope to followup with fotos.  And a discussion has begun about what to do with the hardwoods of the boardwalk:  Angelique, teak, pine, ipe, Cumaru,  greenheart  . . .  Click here and here for typical articles.   And as for sewage systems, the news is not good either.

Here’s a foto Elizabeth took today as I drove along Belt Parkway . . .   yacht still along the park.

Thanks to Barbara and Elizabeth for these fotos.  FWIW, Barbara . . . who went to work every day after November 5, managed to do so without heat, electricity, or running water.

I know the sixth boro sees lots of RO-RO traffic, these

almost hermetically sealed vessels like CSAV Rio Aysen that allow vehicles to roll on or roll off a port.    This is the time of year when new year models of automobiles are heavily advertised.  It’s also a time post-Sandy when folks are looking to replace cars crushed by falling trees.

Since Sandy I’ve seen lots of RO-ROs, like

Aida, shown here passing Potomac and

here in the distance heading out the Ambrose Channel,  out beyond NYK Romulus (see fotos of her from the Bayonne Bridge) and the Narrows.

Here’s Western Highway inbound a week ago, and

Grande Guinee–hull down–headed for West Africa the same day.  She’s approaching Cape Verde right now.  In the foreground . . . it looks like Emerald Coast, tending barge alongside an NYK container ship.

And then it occurred to me:  sixth boro ports have large areas only a few feet above sea level where new cars just offloaded await shipment inland.  Were there any in port when Sandy came ashore?    Uh, only about half a billion dollars worth!  These cars, never used, now head straight for the scrap yard.   I’d have volunteered to help drive some of these cars to higher ground away from the port.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Thanks to Michele, here’s a story about burning Priuses and Fiskers at Port Newark.

I’m surprised it’s been almost five whole years since I did the previous installment by this name.   The sixth boro is a huge fuel transfer port, and currently Sandy has moved oil back onto everyone’s brain . . . mostly because of how difficult it is to procure.  Fuel is gold.  The other day when I was standing in line to get to vote, the joke I heard several times was that at the end of the line we’d either get a ballot or a five-gallon container of fuel.

New York harbor is filled with expensive vessels either waiting to move fuel  . . . like Dace Reinauer,

Pati R. Moran, or

Rebel.  Or

they’re actually moving it . . . like from Eagle Matsuyama to this Bouchard barge probably usually pushed by

Evening Star.

Or fuel is actually being moved from one to another node in the distribution chain . . . like here Diane B,

Mako,

Pocomoke,

Pocomoke and Comet (in foreground),

B. Franklin Reinauer,

and Evening Mist . . ..

All this movement notwithstanding, gas rationing is still in effect.

Anyone read whether consumption has decreased because of the rationing?

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Here was installment #21.

This foto was taken from Front Street in Stapleton, Staten Island.  The gray vessel is docked at the pier now used by Firefighter II.  What’s remarkable about this foto–I think–is that Hurricane Sandy has brought together here  (l to r) a re-purposed C5 and a repurposed C4, two old-fashioned but reborn American built ships.  Let’s take them chronologically.  The black hull is T/S Kennedy, a C4-S-66a originally built by Avondale Industries as Velma Lykes, has been activated to serve as housing for relief workers.  Thank you Mass Maritime.   The gray hull is SS Wright, a C5-S-78a originally built by Ingalls Shipbuilding as Mormacsun, was quite some time ago reconfigured as aviation (helicopter) logistics support ship T-AVB-1.

Here’s as close as I could get, and

here’s a view from the south.

RIBs are a common sight here, and

Is this the Moose boat that sank off Breezy Point back in September 2012?

And finally . . . I know Patrick Sky is not a government boat, but she was posing here yesterday with a snmall UACE vessel.

While looking at this list of MARAD design vessels, which include Wright and Kennedy, I notice E. A. Fisher, built in 1963 and donated to NYC in 1993.  Of course, I’m new on this scene, but has anyone heard of this vessel?  What became of it?

Any guesses on the identification of vessel/structure X above?  I assumed it was military.  Answer follows.

The long frustrating lines at the gas pumps locally are NOT the result of absence of fuel in the port.  From l to r here are tankers Queen Express, Romo Maersk, Sira, and Mercini Lady . . .

Closer up of Romo Maersk and Sira.  Although these tanker are in port, they’re not at the usual docks because

this activity is in high gear there:  hydrographic surveying for hidden obstacles and possibly

retrieving them.   Tug here is Harry McNeal.

Oil is being moved, however, in the likes of barge Edwin A. Poling, pushed by Kimberly Poling,  and

barge Pacific, pushed by North Sea and assisted here by tug Pegasus. Clipper Legacy is obscured at the dock there also.

Here it is . .  vessel/structure X aka Happy Delta bringing in some large structures marked

NYC Sanitation.   ?

It’s great to get this angle of Pati R. Moran, but noteworthy also . .  the orange vessel in the background . . . it’s Duncan Island, bringing NYC its bananas.

Western Highway . . . transports who knows what vehicles

And surely some parts of the port are flowing when APL Cyprine ingresses as Hoechst Express egresses.

Note the tan colored vehicles atop  . . .  port side.  Charles D. McAllister escorts.

JLTVs mebbe?  Among other things  . . .

And the two final images thanks to AIS marinetraffic . . . .  the inflow Monday morning at 0800 . . . and

today, Tuesday, at 1400.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who is mindful that many folks on land around the sixth boro still lack electricity, heat, and cable communications; and walk up and down dark stairs in high rises to get MREs passed out by the National Guard.    Temperatures this morning here were in the mid-30s . . . i.e., just a hover above freezing.

May 30, 2012 . . . around 1000 hrs.  I’d forgotten taking this foto until a conversation with Harold Tartell this afternoon.  RIP . . .   Bounty in that foto was heading for Newburgh, NY.  Note the USCG vessel lower right.

Here are more fotos from my harbor jaunt yesterday…  Apollo Bulker now lies at the dock in Rensselaer.

John A. Noble passed the Statue on the Upper Bay at midday yesterday.

Lower  Manhattan yesterday was a maze of pumps powered by portable generators of all sizes.  I’m not sure where this water is being pumped from.   But waters in other parts of that area smelled of fuel;  people wearing masks–there’s a whole new meaning to Halloween mask now–ran pumps and threw out waterlogged debris from residences and businesses.

Google “John B. Caddell” now and you’ll see lots of stories describing this vessels as a “168′ water tanker” or a “700-ton water tanker.”  It’s NOT a water tanker.  It was built as hull # 137 for Chester A. Poling Inc.  to transport petroleum.  Soon after delivery, it was turned over to the Navy and redubbed YO-140.    After the war, ownership was returned to the Poling company, and until its sale “foreign”  about two years ago.  It’s NOT a water tanker . . . it did not transport water as a paying cargo.

It’s remarkable to see the number of government helicopters in the skies over New York–and the military trucks and personnel.  This afternoon I spoke with US Forest Service crew in my neighborhood–Queens–clearing roadways: the person I talked to, from Arkansas, had never been in NYC before.  He said he was working with USFS crews from Texas, Wisconsin, and Ohio.  Thanks, welcome to NYC, and come back sometime when we’re all feeling better.

And finally, attributed to the Daily News . . . LARCs come ashore on Belle Harbor, Queens to assist.   Click on the foto to get the Daily News story.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except that story and fantastic foto by Vera Chinese the NY Daily News.

After coming home last night, I finally finished reading Rockwell Kent‘s 1929 memoir N by E.    Rockwell Kent lived for a time on the curve at 1262 Richmond Terrace (Staten Island) just east of the Caddell Dry Dock.   N by E tells the story of his shipwreck on the western shore of Greenland near Godthaab and subsequent struggle to survive.    Here are some teaser excerpts.

“We lay, caught in the angle of a giant step of rock, keel on the tread and starboard side on the riser; held there by wind and sea; held there to lift and pound; to lift so buoyantly on every wave; to drop–crashing our 13 iron-shod tons on granite.  There, the perfection of our ship revealed itself; only, that having struck just once, she ever lived, a ship, to lift and strike again. …  wind, storm, snow, rain, hail, lightning and thunder, earthquake and flood.”  (page 132)    Some time later, the three crew save what supplies they can and scramble up the rocks to safety.  Kent again:  “The three men stand there looking at it all  [including the wreckage of their vessel Direction]   … at last one of them speaks.  ‘It’s right,’ he says, ‘that we should pay for beautiful things.  And being here in this spot, now, is worth traveling a thousand miles for, and all that it has cost us.  Maybe we have lived only to be here now.'”  (144)  And later   “It was clear to us that the boat would remain on the ledge and even be, at low tide, partly out of the water.  She appeared to have been completely gutted …  the forecastle hatch now stood uncovered and every sea came spouting through it like a geyser, bearing some quaint contribution to the picturesque assortment that littered the rocks and water.  Books, paper, painting canvas, shoes, socks, eggs, potatoes:  we fished up what we could.”  (148)

Somehow Kent found himself ennobled in that personal disaster.   There’s hope.  It’s also a good read.

Last foto here passed along by Justin Zizes Jr .  . partly submerged fishing boat in Sheepshead Bay.

Think of the sixth boro as a destination/origin as well as a crossroads.  WMEC-905 Spencer anchored in that point of convergence as of midday.

In points not far from Spencer and the Statue, cargo destined for/originating in this port was moving only if it could transfer in the harbor, petroleum liquid, like here, congress happened between barges powered by Pati T Moran and Sassafras as Meagan Ann passes by with a scow.  For debris?

Kimberly Turecamo stands by with Long Island itself . . . well,  a fuel barge by that name. The spirit is greatly willing to move fuel to faltering consumers on the shore, but the distribution system is broken, for now.

Nicole Leigh Reinauer awaits the green light.

St Andrews with barge on this side and Kimberly Poling on the other . . . like thirsty twins on their mother, Glory Express.

Traversing the sixth boro . . .  Marion Moran pushes LaFarge barge Adelaide to points south.

Supply boat ABC-1 passes tanker Favola.

Diane B waits with a barge.  A problem is that debris like blowaway and sunken containers may lurk unseen at the transfer docks.

Doris Moran, with another LaFarge barge, makes a power turn from the North River into the East River.

A cluster of DonJon vessels–tugs Mary Alice, Thomas D. Witte, and Brian Nicholas–attend to crane barges Columbia NY and Raritan Bay on some “unwatering” project just west of the Battery Coast Guard station.

Transiting the sixth boro from south to North is Apollo Bulker.  More fotos of her later.  She may be headed to Albany.

Ken’s Booming & Boat Service tug Durham passes the “seeing boat” Circle Line Manhattan.

Over by the Brooklyn Navy Yard, schooner Lynx heads for the Sound, past an East River ferry.

And–this just in–as of 1900 hrs tonight, APL Sardonyx became the first container ship to enter Port Elizabeth,

escorted in by McAllister Sisters and Barbara McAllister.   Interestingly, see the foto here of her as one of the first into the port post-Irene!!  Here’s another shot almost exactly two years ago of  APL Sardonyx.

And a bit later, APL Coral came in, escorted by  Elizabeth and Ellen McAllister.

Outside the Narrows waits USS Wasp, recently here five months ago for Fleet Week.   A pulse has been re-established.

I am mindful that many residents of the area are hurting.  My prayers go out for relief for them soon.  Folks who suffered through post-Katrina are also sending along their prayers and encouragement, their solidarity with Sandy-afflicted.

We went through a “reboot” here 14 months ago, but this one is going to be much tougher.

x

It appears that Staten Island ferry John J. Marchi was crossing the Upper Bay just before 1800 hrs.  Otherwise, it was still mostly government boats like

NOAA S-222 Thomas Jefferson, performing post-storm hydrographic surveys.  I took this foto back in early September 2012.  Buoys move, debris lurks, and bottom depths change.  Assessing and correcting these and other conditions of the port are keeping lots of folks really busy . . . .

I braved gridlock and frantic traffic with very long lines at gas stations to get to my work.  A detour–of course–led me past Arthur Kill Park across from the Howland Hook Container Terminal.  As no doubt you’ve seen in fotos of docks, boardwalks, and coastal areas from Cape May to here, these fishing docks are wrecked.  Remarkable here is that this dock is protected by 10 miles of waterway and  Staten Island’s heights from the ocean.

Two vessels that rode out the storm in port are (l to r) dredge Atchafalaya and container ship CSAV Itajai, not sure why this latter stayed in port.    Here’s my previous not-so-great foto of Atchafalaya.

As I said, lots of assessments are happening . . .  which means very little traffic.

I believe this is survey boat Cape Elizabeth.  In the distance at Fort Wadsworth–wonder how my goats are–notice the tents set up for Sunday’s NY Marathon.

And this may very well be the first tug/barge to leave the sixth boro post-Sandy . . . Morgan Reinauer, I think.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, and except for the shot of Thomas Jefferson . . . all taken today.

If you’re free and local, here’s a lecture on hurricane/flood risk coming up in two weeks on my friend Philip’s blog.  And here’s insights on risk assessment/response driving the Dutch “deltaworks” project after their “once in 10,000 years” flood considerations post-1953 North Sea flood, which claimed over 2000 lives.  

I took all these fotos this morning.  First, here’s the ashoremost portion of John B Caddell in the parking lot waterside of Edgewater Drive, roughly across from the Clifton*** Staten Island Railroad stop.  After being delivered from RTC Shipbuilding in Camden, NJ in mid-December 1941, she has come to her end.  Most of her life she delivered petroleum products, not water.  Click here for a foto of her at work in the sixth boro six years ago.

Looking eastward, one might imagine a beautiful day under dramatic clouds, with the current pilot boat New York in the spotlight, in

an otherwise unusually empty Upper Bay.

An especially clean street here belies

debris left strewn on the street showing how high the surge rose and

leaving behind vile stuff like dozens (!) of vials of blood . . . with recognizable names on them!

Alice Austen house, about a mile farther south,

was spared, but just.

Neighbors on lower land began the cleanup.

And the Kills and Upper Bay, devoid of traffic, had a few vessels checking navigation channels.

Has anyone gotten “aftermath” fotos of Binghamton to share?  Here, here, and here are my fotos of that vessel post-Irene.

To reiterate, I found the scattered vials with blood along Edgewater Drive very disturbing.  I called 311.

From a mariner’s perspective whose truck got flooded while he was working afloat, click hawsepiper here.

For a report on the storm from a high-rise over the East River, click here for Vlad and Johna’s blog.

*** Six months ago another vessel washed up on another beach called Clifton here.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

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My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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