You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Erie Canal’ tag.

0aaaats60aaaats50aaaats30aaaats10aaaats2Ex-harbor tug 15 built in Boston by Electric Boat.  Later she was YTL-479, and since 1960 has worked on the Erie Canal as tug Seneca.

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Anyone know the story here?  It’s a state boat, though not in NYS Canal Corp colors.

 

0aaaauu60aaaauu50aaaauu40aaaauu30aaaauu20aaaauu1The 1823 culvert under the canal is a spectacle.  Hope you enjoyed it from below and above here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who didn’t need a drone camera for these.

 

When I noticed someone standing on a bridge in this rural area, I suspected it might be Bob, a person I’d never met but  . . . click here to see how many posts he’s already contributed to.

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Anyhow, I was not surprised when later I received the following photos…

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… all taken between Clyde and Lyons by Robert Stopper.

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Thank, Bob, and great to meet you.

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Portions of NYS Canals run in the rivers, like here . . . where not a trace of human control of nature can be found except

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here and there a navigational aid, and it would surprise no one if

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a sasquatch would appear on the bank.

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But railways and highways paralleling the canal are there, even though in places trees mask their presence.

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Interstate to the south, and railway AND two-lane to the north.

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Sometimes rail and

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often highways switch banks.

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All photos along the Erie Canal/Mohawk river by Will Van Dorp.

For some appropriate links, check this on the history of the “Western Canal” and the arrival of competing rail.  For more Mohawk Valley rail history, click here.

For  link to many more links about the construction of the NY Thruway through this same area, click here.

For info on the latest mode of transport through the corridor, recreational cycling, clck here.

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I enjoyed meeting so many nice people at the Roundup this past weekend.

 

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Whether you carry passengers like Grande Caribe or bulk like Day Peckinpaugh, restrictions of size are the same.

Photos today by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the first post in this series.  The photo below I took last week after the newly painted engine room deck had dried.  At that point, I could have eaten off that “floor,” you know . . . a sandwich, a slice of pizza, although I would have used a plate so that the slice wouldn’t get the floor dirty.   At this point, we are forward of the engine, looking down the port side.

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Here’s a photo I took five years ago, same side of the engine.  Chris . . . the 6′ engineer shows scale . . .

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The next several photos show the starboard side of the engine.  The camera was nearly on the deck.  Upper left side of the photo shows the red grates of the engineer’s station and the chain attaching the controls to the engine.

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This is almost the same shot taken with camera about three feet from the deck.

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Here’s starboard side of the engine looking forward, and

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ditto . ..  taken at level with the catwalk the engineer walks on to manually lubricate the moving engine while under way.

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This is looking forward from “behind” the flywheel.

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The photo below shows the engine room controls to the engine.  Click on the photo to hear and see the Atlas Imperial running.  The sound here differs from the clip embedded in the following photo because here the generator is off.

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The shot below shows the upper engine controls, just forward of the seat where the engineer sits.  Click on the photo for a video of the engineer executing engine commands as the captain communicates them via bell and jingle.  In the video–yes, I invert the camera after a few seconds–the constant roar in the Kohler engine/generator/compressor.  The video starts with an air-start.  At the 10-second mark, the bell commands the engineer to stop the engine.  At the 18-second mark, the bell commands him to restart the engine in the opposite direction.  The captain was doing a three-point turn in a narrow portion of the canal during this time.

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Even though the post is called “internal” Urger, here’s a show from outside the wheelhouse.  Click on it to see and hear the Atlas Imperial running;  again, in this clip the generator is off.  The video was done fairly early in the morning and shooting into the sun.

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All photos and video by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to get better video of the AI once back on the boat.

 

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