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I’m slowing this down;  yesterday I posted a record-setting 32 fotos, if I counted right.   And I’m making this personal, dedicating this to my wonderful Colombian and Ecuadorian students and to my Indonesian relatives.

Gloria is the official flagship of the Colombia Navy, based in Cartagena.  Yes, we’ve heard too much about some malfeasance there recently.

The population of Colombia is 46 million; the size of the Navy is 35,000.

Here’s view from astern of barques Gloria and Guayas, looking toward Coney Island.

The population of Ecuador is 14 million, and the total personnel of the Navy is a bit over 7200.   The logo on the “sail” between the foremast and mainmast promotes Ecuadorian tourism.  If I had limitless funds and time, I’d go everywhere, but Ecuador includes Amazonian forest, high Andes, the Galapagos, and so much more.

You might know this, but the population of Indonesia is over 240 million, the fourth most populous country, with many cultures and some 700 languages!

Click here for Dewaruci’s itinerary on their round-the-world voyage.

As an archipelago nation made up of more than 18,000 islands, it’s not surprising it has a navy of 150 ships and 74,000 sailors. In the distance, that’s Buchanan 1 moving rock through the archipelago of the sixth boro.

As to my relatives . . . I did have four uncles who fought there against Indonesian independence a half century ago.

I’m eager to see the wood carving closeup;  as a kid, I was scared to visit my grandmother’s house because of a frightful Balinese mask hanging on her wall.

If you have the chance, visit these and other vessels around the sixth boro this weekend.  Click here for further info.  I’ll be working a dock of Staten Island Saturday morning and Brooklyn Sunday and Monday morning.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

When I see foreign mariners, whether on modern cargo vessels or on tall ships, I recall reading that Ho Chi Minh (scroll through to the paragraph “In the USA”) traveled to the US aboard a ship 100 years ago exactly and lived here for a  number of years.    Too bad that story doesn’t have a happy ending.

Unrelated:  Check this list of nations with tall ship/sail training vessels.  It’s interesting to think of which do not . . .

Finally, thanks to all who voted for Peagus and LV-79;  unfortunately they were not in the top four.    We tried.

Here’s  some of my May 2010 coverage of Fleet Week’s arrival.  So Fleet Week and OpSail 2012 have converged, commingling state-of-the-art with traditional vessels.   Now add  into the mix F/A-18s and Hudson river water pumped through the system of  1931 John J. Harvey.  Doubleclick enlarges fotos.

Leading the fleet is Eagle.

And leading the tall ships is J. S. de Elcano (1927).

The day was blessed with atmospheric light

…and acrobatic and disciplined sailors.

Not as common a name to our ears as Magellan, Elcano was Magellan’s second-in-command and the one who completed “Magellan’s circumnavigation” more than a year after Magellan was killed in 1521.

Vessels included destroyer USS Roosevelt (commissioned 2000),

Gazela (1901), (Get tickets to this weekend’s Gazela theater here.)

USS San Jacinto (commissioned 1988),

and Dewaruci (launched 1953, keel laid 1932).

I wondered what these crew would do if the ominous sky sent thunder and lightning.

Etoile, I believe, was there as were

La Belle Poule (1932),

and Cisne Branco  (2000) and   HCMS Iroquois (1970, 1992).

Crew rode high in the rigging of Cisne Branco.

Cuauhtemoc (commissioned 1982) passed in review with

more crew in the rigging.

Emily Miller made the parade and in the distance, it’s  USS Gonzalez (commissioned 1996).

Click here for info on the namesake for DDG-66.

Appledore 5 crosses JS Shirane (commissioned 1980).

The sailing vessel heeled over is Summerwind (1929) and approaching is James Turecamo  (1969), prepared to handle white hulls.

Pride of Baltimore II is especially significant, given that the rationale for an OpSail event this year is the bicentennial of the war of 1812.   This fact also makes significant the participation by a Canadian and a British vessel in Fleet Week.

And huge flag . . . says it’s Gloria  (commissioned 1968), passing

RFA Argus, container ship turned floating hospital.

Colombian crew –men and women–in the rigging

and on the jibbom put on a colorful show.

Guayas (commissioned 1976)

had skyscraper crew at the very top of the mast.

And finally . .  a return for USS Wasp.   Notice the tug midships port side.  Know it?

I was surprised to learned it was neither Charles D. nor Responder but Roderick (1967) !  Generally, Roderick is not a sixth boro tug.

And here’s another unusual sight, commingling the power of a McAllister and a Moran  assisting Wasp into the berth.

Parade over, Catherine heads back to the dock, as does Pioneer (commissioned 1885!!)

And a final shot for today, TWO French handiworks, Belle Poule and the Statue of Liberty.

All fotos by will Van Dorp.

Outbound at 0800 this morning, Swan took a turn past the Statue before leaving.  Foto by John Watson, who is himself outbound for a while.

Out of luck I was in guessing the timing, so I got this view as Swan was outbound for the port of Luba, I’m told.   Luba is on the island now known as Bioko, which

I once knew as Fernando Po, a rare place in Africa where Spanish is the official language.    I hope the Atlantic Salvor folks got some good fotos of Swan headed out.

Yacht Justice (1930) is an outstanding survivor.

I’ve know idea what this trio of military/interdiction go-fast boats are, bt they are turly out-of-the-ordinary.

Also, out-of-the-ordinary for the sixth boro is Dewaruci, in port early for OpSail, arriving here on Wednesday.  Dewa Ruci appears to be a character in a wayang puppet story.  I’m looking forward to their marching band.   Over near the Red Hook side, that’s Pioneer.

And this is the start of leg 2 of the Atlantic Cup race, outbound for Newport this morning.

Over a dozen teams have entered boats.

Possible leader, pending resolution of a protest)  at the end of leg 1 (of 3) is this boat.

Oh yes . . . out of focus!   !@#@!!   And I loved the composition.

And finally . . . these folks are really outbound to a place even less known . . . maybe than Luba.

I love the hammock and banana bunch here.  For some fotos of Avatiu, click here.  For really outstanding fotos from there, click this one.

Picton Castle stack logo is quite outlandish.

First foto by outbound John Watson.  all others by Will Van Dorp.

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