You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Dann Ocean Marine’ tag.

Tugboats in the sixth boro of New York City vary not quite infinitely, but almost.   Consider Pegasus (1907)here with Lehigh Valley 79 (1914) alongside.  And my social medium tells me they’re about to link up and travel again soon.    Watch Pier 25.

And Coral Coast (1970) versus its fleetmate,

and newest tugboat in the boro .  .  . Discovery Coast (2012).

Amy C. McAllister (1975) and

Bohemia (2007).

Taurus (1979) and

James Turecamo (1969) along assisting Scott Turecamo (1998).

Thornton Brothers (1958),

Caitlin Ann (1961), and

Maria J (1958).

Rounding it all out . . . is JoAnne Reinauer III (1970), here passing the unmistakeable Torm-orange house of Torm Thames (2005), and see this spotlight by selfabsorbedboomer.

Having called this set almost infinitely varied, I must say there’s NOTHING operating in the sixth boro quite an unusual as Joseph Thompson Jr. (portions from 1944), the tug portion of an ATM unit currently working the North Coast between US and Canadian ports.   Thank’s to Isaac Pennock aka tugboathunter for introducing me to this vessel;  For the dizzying set of transformations, read the bio by boatnerd here . . . and follow the fotos, especially the ones by Mark Vander Meulen, Steve Hause, Lee Rowe, and Rod Burdick.

Foto of Discovery Coast by Joel Milton;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

Fundraiser TONIGHT Dec 1, 2010 for the tug Pegasus!!  It’s unfortunate that I have to work elsewhere tonight.

A short post today . . .  it’s December and just to call it windy out is an understatement along the lines of saying that in winter the sixth boro is less hot than in June, that sex is just exercise, and that this video is a fenderbender.

Oh, well . . .  enjoy these fotos: Specialist II slings a string (strings along a sling?) of rock scows into the confluence of the East (so-called) River and the Hudson.  That’s

Red Hook container port in the background, with the nose of Mary Whalen protruding from behind the blue warehouse.

And here’s a catch-up from my Philly posts of last week:  when Captain Dann towed the Lockwood 2002 barge south-bound the cargo looked

all boxed up like this.  Maybe something headed south or east for Sinterklaas?

Nah.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Thanks to Carolina Salguero of PortSide NewYork for calling that video to my attention.

And since I’m linking to videos today, see this one, a music video that uses the Witte scrapyard as backdrop.  I really like the music, but I think the ship remains in the Arthur Kill location should be the main event, NOT the backdrop.

Fundraiser notice Dec 1, 2010 for the tug Pegasus!!

I give thanks for the doomed ships getting a (maybe temporary) reprieve, although there’s no denying that Olympia does NOT rise and fall with the tide.  Here she clearly rests

on Delaware bottom.  The draft numbers there suggest a countdown . . . til drydocking and rescue?

While it lasted, the snow seemed more appropriate for Christmas than Thanksgiving.  Timothy McAllister moves upriver, as does

Captain Dann, seeking a load for an empty Lockwood 2002 barge;  see the loaded barge . . . tomorrow.  In the background, Castlegate takes on cargo, after having left New York just Tuesday.

Crew of SKS Tyne fotograph each other as they leave Philly and

Camden and their skylines and

waterfront work and

mothballed vessels. SKS Tyne, goodspeed for whatever your next destination and next ….

Pilotboat Overfalls heads south, and

no matter the day, the harbor beat goes on.

All fotos, Thanksgiving Day, by Will Van Dorp.

Soon afterward, I went out for a Thanksgiving lobster.  Speaking of, read this great article about the Pilgrims and their Thanksgiving eels.

OK, Seattle just has to wait when a bridge (that gets built over  100 miles north of the location where it’s destined to replace another bridge that has stood for 109 years)  gets shipped downriver by three tugboats AND gets covered by the NYTimes AND the Wall Street Journal.  My plan is to get fotos early tomorrow morning as it navigates between Manhattan and Hoboken or Jersey City.  For now, with many many thanks, here are fotos from Deborah dePeyster . . . as it passed by Coxsackie, where she camped out so as to ensure not missing the excitement, then

Catskill Point;

then fotos by Jeff Anzevino from the walkway and bridge at Poughkeepsie;

then Harold Tartell with fotos from Newburgh.

What the mainstream newspapers missed was the names of the tugs:  left to right:  Ruby M, Margot, and Elizabeth.

I have and will share lots more fotos from Seattle, a location seriously trying my faithfulness to the sixth boro.  But for now, my plan is to get up early enough to catch the bridge  edging somewhere tomorrow at dawn through the sixth boro.

Articles from the mainstream media are here:  NYTimes, Wall Street Journal.  New media here: DNAinfo.com, iStockAnalyst. My only criticism of these articles is that they do not specify  the names of the tugs, not to be picky or anything.

After “taking your house on a trip,” moving a bridge to somewhere is the next best thing.  Oh, what is the world coming to?

Thanks to Deborah, Jeff, and Harold for these fotos.  So if the old Willis Avenue Bridge lasted 109 years, how might you imagine the replacement for THIS one happening in 2119?

More Seattle soon.

Before these views of the bridge at Bayonne, two quick reminders:  1) the drum calls to the big parade less than a handful days away, and 2) the voting for caption contest #2 takes just a few seconds.  Do it, please.

A half year ago, you saw views of Outerbridge;   what unifies these fotos is the most beautiful bridge over the sixth boro that now threatens to stifle the sixth boro as well as the other five.  When the Bayonne opened in 1931, it set the mark as the longest steel arch bridge in the world.  Similarly, the foto below (looking to the southwest from central Brookln, over Red Hook, and toward the Bayonne)  was taken from 44 Court Street in Brooklyn, which in 1901 was the tallest building in Brooklyn.   Certainly, it’s a most enviable view of the sixth boro I’ve seen in a while.

I have a request at the end of this post.

Supply vessel Sorensen Miller distances itself from the Bridge on a foggy May day.

Falcon leaves it behind as it enters the Buttermilk Channel.

Shannon Dann heads farther southwest of it.

Patriot Service pushes a fuel barge toward it for refill.

Scott Turecamo, locked 60 feet into the notch of fuel barge New Hampshire, uses its 5100 hp to drive the unit toward the Bridge.  To the left is Cape Cod, which first appeared here two and a half years ago.

A light and curvaceous Timothy L. Reinauer steams toward the yard on this side of the Bridge.

Help me out here:  an unidentified tug (a Great Lakes Dredge & Dock boat?)  pushes a scow (with Boston registry?)  toward the KVK beyond the Bridge.  Foto taken in 2008.

From the same Elizabeth (NJ) perspective, unidentified tug and tanker collaborate so that one may head for sea.

Bayonne, the Bridge too low for the future . . .  what will it look like in 10 years?

My request:  send me your views of the Bayonne Bridge, the more unusual, the better.  I’m proudest of the second shot above, as the tower of 44 Court is a special place.  Send me your unusual shots and we’ll reprise this topic.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but very notable:  Check out this memorial post for the first CGC Escanaba, which made the supreme sacrifice 67 years ago last weekend.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 389 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments? Email Tugster

My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

free web page hit counter
September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 389 other followers