You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Bayonne wind turbine’ tag.

I took this foto at 15:40 yesterday, and I’ll call it “prelude to afternoon golden hour,”  but this is a view of the turbine from the Battery Park direction. A few weeks ago, I recorded 18 minutes, so here’s more than twice that.

Geese head to wherever they go at dusk.

SalvageMaster passing Caletta ushers in the golden times, 16:30.

Over toward the Narrows, Hellas Progress radios in an initial departure call.   In the distance, Tokyo Express approaches.

Lucy Reinauer pushing barge RTC 83 exits the KVK, followed

Kristy Ann, her bronze and red color enhanced by the setting sun.

By the time Kristy Ann reaches the Brooklyn half, Tokyo Express has started her approach into MOT, and

Hellas Progress has spun around toward the open sea.

By now, it’s 17:10, temperature starts to drop as quickly as the color intensifies.

It no longer feels like summer in February, nor does it look like it.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

So  . . . the bright sunshine and 45+ degree temperature coaxed me out to take some fotos, and soon I’m having a conversation with a gentleman whose first thought was wind power device was deck-mounted equipment on the reddish tanker.  Clearly here . . .  t-o-w-e-r   rhymes with power and not lawn mower.  I’m guessing it to be the tallest structure in Bayonne.    Any idea what Manhattan’s first skyscraper was and where?  It lasted only three years (1853–6) before it burnt down.

It’s definitely land-based.  But I thought I could have some fun creating

some alternative-powered shipping, like a wind turbine barge  DoubleSkin 303.

How about a Jane A. Bouchard with a huge air prop, or

this on an extra-tall Quantico Creek?

Ditto Greenland Sea?

Or a turbine atop the tower of the newly-minted Mediterranean Sea?

Closer up, this is what the hub looks like.

Some of the parts are US-made;  others come from Austria.  Here are some introductory  technical details.  If I read Leitwind’s homepage correctly, this is their first turbine delivered to the US.  Here are even more technical details, again from a New Jersey publication.

Northern New York state has a surprisingly large number of such turbines, as documented in tugster here, and “salties” have been delivering components into the upper Midwest through the St. Lawrence and into the Great Lakes, as Marlene Green, shown here . . . although I caught her running empty.  The five states that currently have the highest percentage of their electric power generated by turbine are:  Iowa, the Dakotas, Minnesota, and Kansas.  Atlantic City has five turbines.  Are there others in NJ?  And Staten Island . . . the idea of wind turbines atop Fresh Kills has certainly been discussed.

As of this writing, I’ve not seen any NY papers mention the Bayonne tower.  Hmm.

Oh, the first “skyscraper”  was Latting Observatory, standing 315 feet.  To learn more, click here.   This bit of erudition comes compliments of Tom Flagg, who is also responsible for this great but maybe slow-loading document of the bygone era of marine rail on the west side of Manhattan.  Thanks, Tom.

Late first snow this season unless you count the few flurries over the sixth boro last October, but flakes did obscure vision this morning.   Of course, Cheyenne is always recognizeable and busy, but Arabian Sea (in green) I had to guess at.

Laurie Ann Reinauer  . . . well, I could read the name on her derriere.

But Barbara McAllister I had to guess at.  (Harold corrects me . . .it’s Amy C. McAllister.  Thanks, Harold.) Snow flakes just blocked out the name.

Franklin . . . I know the profile AND can read the name even with my cokebottle glasses.

But I was looking for a good 10 minutes at this right in front of me and did not even SEE it.  No, not Sanko Blossom, but that new feature beyond her . . . that light colored structure obscured

now and again by a squall.  It wasn’t there a few days ago.

It’s good for my self-confidence that I saw the tower yesterday also, and got fotos of the 260′ tower then, over beyond Hanjin Albany.   Otherwise I might have suspected it came with the storm.   The blades weren’t turning, though, in spite of the wind, since it won’t go operational for a month or so yet. 

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s already wondering if Bayonne can be convinced to put bright colorful lights on the tower next December.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

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