You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Bayonne Bridge’ tag.

(I haven’t used this title since 2008) Ooops!  not true.  Here were 2 and 3.

Notwithstanding all that . ..    sometimes the thought that a day is the first day in the rest of one’s life is superlatively vivid.    Enjoy my pics and maybe you’ll get this sense also.

Sunday afternoon, Zhen Hua 10 enters the Kills. Does anyone know if “Zhen Hua” means anything?  Note Manhattan and the tip of Bayonne to the left, and tug Brooklyn, Robbins Reef Light, and the boro of Brooklyn to the right.

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The new cranes arriving and the bridge their squeezing underneath are integrally related parts of the same story, as . . .

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… are the cranes and the dredging equipment in the background.  Note tug Specialist in the background

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Margaret Moran tends the port bow.

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Gramma Lee T Moran supplies the brakes and rudder.

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The ship completes its journey of thousands of miles.  Is it true that Zhen Hua 10 arrived here via Cape of Good Hope?

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On the same theme . .  here’s a handsome team of tugs, good paint all around.  Working on a tandem assignment?

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My thought when I read the name on the nearer tug was . . . this is historic . . . Crow‘s last ride;  the Bushey tug might also be in the last mile of its thousands and thousands in a half century of work.

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She’s being escorted in by Emily Ann . . .

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Crow and her sister Cheyenne DO have classic lines!

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Machines on shore were already staged . . . .

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while not far away a last spring seal lollygags on some warm rusty metal, once also a brand new machine.

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And on the other side of Staten Island rubble of a light indispensable a century ago adapts to a new life as a rookery.

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Many thanks to NYMedia Boat.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be transiting himself soon.  Thursday I leave on a grand gallivant, and in early June–if all goes well– I start a new chapter working on Urger, that handsome young centenarian tug you see upper left at the top of the page.

I’d planned something else for today, but when Brian DeForest, terminal manager of Atlantic Salt, sent along these fotos –taken Sunday from a unique perspective, I scrapped my erstwhile plan. See the orange details in the foreground?

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These are fotos from the ship, which is currently moving at 10 to 11 knots southbound off Cape May.   That’s the Bayonne Bridge and

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here’s the arm conveying salt onto the pile.

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I’m sure this has a technical term, but I’ll call it the bracket that supports the arm when not in use.

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And here’s a view into the traveling wheelhouse and

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the hold.

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Here is engine room info.

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Finally, here’s Quantico Creek as seen from the bridge wing.

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Here’s a foto I took nearly six years ago on the KVK looking off the starboard bow of a large vessel of another time–a century ago–that used to engage in a salt trade out of Chile.   Know the vessel?

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Answer:  Peking.  Here’s one of six posts I did about that transit of Peking from Caddell’s back to South Street Seaport Museum waters.

Many thanks to Brian DeForest for all these fotos, except the last one.

A thought just occurs to me:  Chile’s main salt port today is Patache.  Could that word be a Spanish spelling/pronunciation of the word “potash”?

The days to use the westside pedestrian/cyclist lane of the Bayonne Bridge are winding down . .  if plans are to be believed.  And then, in 2014 or so when the work is completed, the walk/cycle lane will reside on the east side.

Note the bulb of a vessel appearing between the support members.  I’m thinking that given the use of “flags of convenience” in this industry, this foto might make a suitable flag for an aquatic micronation like Republic of New Atlantis or Oceania.

Behold a possible 4892-teu vessel headed straight for the narrow channel at Mariners Harbor.

Fortunately, that trajectory will be modified by Amy C McAllister.  But I wonder, what would happen if that bow tug should suddenly lose power.

That gray console on the portside bridge wing, can I cal that a bridge wing helm station?

Note the folded forward mast.  Vessel is APL Oman.  Any guesses where she was built?  A clue is that builder is listed as a company named Daewoo.

Bruce A. McAllister acts as the starboard stern thruster.

She’s five days out of the Panama Canal. Here’s APL’s itinerary for the past two months:

2012 August 19th, 13:00:31 UTC New York
2012 August 14th, 04:00:44 UTC Balboa
2012 July 29th, 00:00:08 UTC Pusan
2012 July 27th, 08:30:05 UTC Yang Shan
2012 July 25th, 00:30:49 UTC Hongkong
2012 July 24th, 11:00:17 UTC Yan Tian
2012 July 21st, 22:00:58 UTC Yan Tian
2012 July 21st, 22:00:40 UTC Hongkong
2012 July 19th, 22:30:28 UTC Kaohsiung
2012 June 18th, 08:00:09 UTC Norfolk

The rotation is progressing well.

It seems the starboard bridge wing helm station is covered,  so portside to the dock?

Color-coded overalls keep hierarchy pronounced?

While I’m up on my vantage point overlooking Newark Bay, I have a chance to see what else is around.  From roughly far left to near right, it’s upper blue wheelhouse of DonJon boat, Bebedouro!!, an unidentified ferry, and Cashman’s drillboat Kraken.

All fotos taken today by Will Van Dorp, whose computers are happier than they were yesterday.

And the place of construction for APL Oman . .. Daewoo Mangalia in Romania!!

I took this foto at 15:40 yesterday, and I’ll call it “prelude to afternoon golden hour,”  but this is a view of the turbine from the Battery Park direction. A few weeks ago, I recorded 18 minutes, so here’s more than twice that.

Geese head to wherever they go at dusk.

SalvageMaster passing Caletta ushers in the golden times, 16:30.

Over toward the Narrows, Hellas Progress radios in an initial departure call.   In the distance, Tokyo Express approaches.

Lucy Reinauer pushing barge RTC 83 exits the KVK, followed

Kristy Ann, her bronze and red color enhanced by the setting sun.

By the time Kristy Ann reaches the Brooklyn half, Tokyo Express has started her approach into MOT, and

Hellas Progress has spun around toward the open sea.

By now, it’s 17:10, temperature starts to drop as quickly as the color intensifies.

It no longer feels like summer in February, nor does it look like it.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Although I noticed  no harbingers of snowy December when I stopped briefly at the KVK this morning, my eyes were drawn beyond the barge and tug in the foreground.  My attention went right past what I believe is Greenland Sea  to the vessel in midstream.  Could

it possibly be . . . Barents Sea?    It’s been ages since I saw it move, and judging by

the carbon coming from the stacks, it may very well have been ages since it last ran?  And what might be in the works?

As I followed Barents back toward Mariners Harbor, I noticed another surprise . . . movement up on my favorite bridge.

Routine inspection?  Preliminaries to modification?

Who knows answers to any of these . . . I don’t.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.   Click here for a foto of Barents Sea and Atlantic Salvor in earlier lifetimes.  Atlantic Salvor appears to be keeping Ken Boothe company.

Maersk Kentucky turns at least 90 degrees to starboard after passing under the Bayonne Bridge.  Beyond Shooters Island lies the city of Elizabeth, NJ.  More close-ups of Maersk Kentucky–eleven years running and a fifth of a mile long tomorrow, but for now, she draws more than 30 feet max . . . and notice the mud trail she stirs up.

Here’s a satellite view of Shooters Island;  I believe the vintage foto of Shooters I posted the other day was taken from midway between the A pushpin and the New York ramp of the Bayonne Bridge.  Click on the satellite foto to see where things lie in relation to Manhattan.  Most of the container traffic through the port of “New York” operates through Port Elizabeth.

Again, here’s a tightly-cropped foto of Shooters around World War 1, and here’s a

foto I took from mid-Bayonne Bridge pedestrian way this morning, where I got my exercise.

As I walked over, Maersk Kentucky traversed beneath, tugs Resolute at the bow and Elizabeth McAllister near the stern, making the turn and then


heading into Newark Bay, a half an hour

or so behind Sea Land Eagle, roughly the same size as 1997-delivered ‘Kentucky.  The land in the foreground is Bergen Point.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  See Johna and Vladimir’s homage to the Bridge here.

There always needs to be a first time, for everything.  Maria J (ex-Jesus Saves)  did it for me . . .

my passing from innocence to experience.  I picked the day, bridge dedication plus 80 years with vivid bridge shadow on the water.  Land in the distance is Elizabeth, NJ;  point on right is Bergen Point . . . a section of Bayonne, NJ that once was a farm of tanks . . . an orchard if you prefer.

Zim Virginia was the first ship

to pass beneath me.  Anyone know of fotos of traffic through here 80 and 75 and 50 years ago?

Charles D. McAllister assists port side, and

besides the hard over rudder,

Maurania III, starboard, nudges the vessel to starboard to

avoid Shooter’s Island and head up to Port Elizabeth.

Happy dedication day!  If you missed the link to the pdf published by the Port Authority upon the 75th anniversary, click here.  Great vintage pics.  If you missed the diagram of the planned approximately 80′ raising of the roadbed, click here.

All foto by Will Van Dorp.

So concludes this series . . . with total time elapsed from Qatar nosing around Bergen Point until Suez Canal Bridge‘s stern clearing the west side of the Bayonne Bridge  . . .  about 50 minutes.  Furthermore, a fourth vessel–Seatrout–traversed in that same time period, as did RTC 135, moved by Nicole Leigh Reinauer.

So while you’re enjoying –I hope–these fotos, let me do some math.  Using deadweight tonnage info available in that magic library called the internet, I total the cargo capacity of these four ships and one barge as  . . . 223,157 tons.  And I’ll assume (just an assumption for sake of discussion)  that each of these vessels was at its peak capacity.

While the math process is going on, enjoy the fotos of Ellen McAllister helping rotate Sea Land Mercury at Bergen Point.

Assuming that an average semi-trailer carries 20 tons of cargo, I come up with the equivalent of 11,157 truckloads of cargo passing below this bridge . . .   in 50 minutes!!

Now I’d love to see my illustrator or modeler/gamer friends depict the KVK as a highway and

run 11,000+ trucks under this arch in 50 minutes!  Read the thoughts of  Ellen McAllister captain here, thanks to gCaptain.  Another article on Ellen appeared here  in the Wall Street Journal today!

Imagine noise and fumes of 11,000 trucks/per hour . . . and impact on traffic flow.  The final shot here shows the stern of APL Qatar, Marion Moran, Seatrout, and the bow of RTC 135.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  As of this writing, Sea Land Mercury is already between Savannah and Mobile.

And if you’re wondering why none of these fotos were taken by the new camera, I was lugging it, but it confounded me by moving one of its own buttons and not working until I got home.

On Sunday, APL Qatar was tied up at the dock at Howland Hook.

Note the snow on the Elizabethport bank.  Imari is the smaller vessel forward of AP Qatar.  I wonder if she’s the only vessel ever named for  export porcelain??  Given the marine environment, I can’t imagine feeling safe on a vessel named for a material so fragile, but I digress.  And let me digress some more, the snowy bank a century ago was home to Crescent Shipyard, where an early generation of submarines was built.  Click here for fotos and story.

As of this writing, Qatar’s already at the dock in Savannah after having arrived and departed Norfolk.  By early afternoon Sunday, she had been backed down, nosed her way past Bergen Point and

slipped beneath the Bayonne Bridge.

Escort appears to be Elizabeth McAllister.

Will there be regrets when this beautiful bridge gets modified?

It appears here that some masts have been folded down.

On the question of the future of this bridge, read the Nathan Holth comment . ..  scroll down.  Not every agrees with the idea of modifying the bridge.

Funding to change the bridge . . . wonder why tolls have recently increased on all the bridges over the sixth boro?  Details  on bridge modification–if it’s a done deal at this point–have been scant.  Will the bridge have an 80th party?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Ever wonder what bridge was the longest steel arch prior to Bayonne’s  acquiring that distinction in 1931?  Before you find out by clicking here, a clue is that it’s also over a sixth boro waterway.

About a year ago this blog featured “turning 70,” with a vessel that subsequently played an unexpected role in history.

See the crewman on the bridge wing looking up?   What’s he monitoring?

Ten minutes earlier I’d caught Suez Canal Bridge nosing around a bend on E 1st Street in Bayonne.  That’s Caddell Dry Dock and Repair Shipyard over on the far side.

Six weeks ago she actually was at the north end of the Suez Canal,

and now she’s headed for a portal that turns 80 this month, the Bayonne Bridge, dedicated on November 13, 1931. For the next 46 years, vessels passing here like Suez Canal Bridge–escorted by Maurania III and Amy C McAllister–could say

they were passing beneath the longest single arch steel bridge

in the world.

In 1977 the New Gorge Bridge took that distinction from the Bayonne Bridge.  See what the New Gorge Bridge looks like here, and that was in turn eclipsed by the Lupu Bridge.

Some vessels traversing this waterway and squeezing under this arch may in fact know the Lupu Bridge.

Anyone have fotos to share of tugboats on the Huangpu in Shanghai?

Maurania III churns the waters to turn Suez Canal Bridge the 90-plus degrees into Newark Bay at Bergen Point.

By the way, the Lupu Bridge is itself no longer than longest steel arch bridge in the world, a distinction that now belongs to the Chaotienmen Bridge.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

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