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. . .or dino juice or geo sap.  According to the US Energy Info Administration, the US consumes just under 20 million barrels of the stuff daily.  Today, in less than a half hour, two tankers entered the Kills with a combined capacity (if I calculate correctly) of over a million barrels, or 5% of one day’s US consumption.  First came Avra . . .

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seen in by Brendan Turecamo.   I’d guessed I’d never seen this tanker before

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til it came close.  Last time I took a foto of her, she sported flaky green paint and the name Altius . . . not Michele Iuliano, the raised metal name covered inadequately here.

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Here are vestiges of her formerly green superstructure.

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A previous time Americas Spirit came in, she made energetic use of her horn whistle as she plowed through the fog.  Note:  I wish I could perfect the art of whistling with that low penetrating pitch!

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It seems from this itinerary that she’s in here once every two months.

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Click here to see a report on her from some bloggers who watch the Straits of Canso.

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Barbara McAllister and McAllister Sisters bring her in like a big catch, lots of juice.

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All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

First, in case you missed the links Lazer One put in the comments section of Arctic Shuttle Tanker, including his profile drawing of that cold weather tanker, check them here.  I’ve also added Lazer One to my links list.

In the foto below, mirage-hovering on the horizon today . . . can you identify the company by color scheme?

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It’s Torm Aslaugh, arriving with ice-caked manifold.   For itinerary of past half year, click here.

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Spray from hawse rinse (if that’s the term) has settled on the bow of Nord Intelligence  before she left port today.

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She was in the sixth boro about six months back.  To see where she’s been since, click here.

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Tanker Venice, before heading out today . . . it looked like she was steam-cleaning her manifold.

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Ice removal perhaps?

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Tugs like Atlantic Salvor and

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Barbara McAllister has their share of

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frosty glaze.

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All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Take 2 . . . some the same, some different.  Lynx southbound at 16:08.

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Evening Star anchored at 16:09.

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Christine McAllister anchored at 16:10.

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Julia and Twin Tube attending Maersk Katarina at 16:13 at the 28 buoy.

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Crystal Cutler heading for the Kills at 16:30.

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Overseas Atalmar and bow of American Spirit at anchor . . . 16:37.

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Another shot of Christine McAllister at 16:44.

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Discovery Coast at 16:46.

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Liberty V at 16:53 bound for Liberty Island . . . a crewboat.

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Twisted #2 sign at the Battery looking toward Jersey City at 17:07.

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Barbara McAllister preparing to remake the tow at 17:26.

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Maserati VOR70 at the dock, heeled over for repairs, at 17:40

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I first used this title a year ago . . . when I caught morning light in December here.    Solstice time for me . . .  I want there to be light, preferably the golden kind outdoors.  These fotos were all taken in less than 90 minutes.  Lynx was southbound,

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as was Joan Turecamo, each on the far side of a barge.

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Maersk Katarina and Soley-1 awaited on the hook.

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Overseas Atalmar did the same, closer to the Staten Island side.

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As the sun declined behind Staten’s summit, a last gleam of sunlight did its magic.

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A fortunate building in Brooklyn appeared to catch fire as

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sun set over beyond the Kills.

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Craig Eric Reinauer headed north and

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Barbara McAllister slowed up to remake the tow.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, whose batteries run low in this season when there’s a need for light . . . .  If you’ve never been down at the Battery at sunset this time of year, it’s high time you treat yourself.

Here was 15.

Cargoes of all sorts move through the harbor.  One that has always surprised me is this ore from the Congo in the first half of the 20th century.

Here’s a vessel–certainly empty as it was towed to drydock in the old Brooklyn Navy Yard earlier this week.  I missed it but John Watson caught it.  Any ideas?  I believe I saw it in Wilmington back in mid-October.

It’s Falconia of the Corral Line, adapted to carry things that go “moo” in the night.  Stephanie Dann and Ruby M act like drovers to get Falconia into its own private East River corral.  Having grown up on an upstate NY dairy farm, I’d love to see a Corral Line vessel loaded and at sea;  even better, anchored on a calm night in a comfortable harbor.

Here’s an additional shot of the cargo barged in last week from Canada, powered by the inimitable Atlantic Salvor.  The cargo, if you missed last week’s post, is antenna sections for the World Trade Center.

Look closely at that patch of blue on Stolt Emerald‘s port side.

Although not cargo, it is truly unique application of paint . . . surfing penguins.

And finally, look at the frontmost cargo on Zim Virginia.

Here’s sideview of two Ford tow trucks, ones to be operated by wrecker drivers rather than towing officers.  And that’s Barbara McAllister running alongside.

Many thanks to John Watson for the Falconia fotos.

I heard the foghorn (or is it called a ship’s horn?)  for some time before I saw the vessel, but I knew I’d see Americas Spirit because of  the AIS app on my phone.  If I’d had my VHF with me, I’d also know from that which vessel approached and with whose assist.

With these and other elements of redundant technology, any vessel–like the small one below– in the vicinity would have slim chance of being surprised by a massive bow like this appearing unexpectedly out of the fog.

So if the question is  . . . why do ships still use these spectacular horns even with all the others means of “seeing” through the fog?   I suppose the answer is that redundancy is a good thing.

Click here for fog horns in San Francisco, but I believe the sounds from Americas Spirit were even lower pitched.  Even at a quarter mile’s distance, I felt it as much as heard.

Once the docking rotation began, the horn ceased…

and Barbara and Responder pinned Americas Spirit to the dock.

That horn booming out of the fog, though, stays with me.  It sounded almost human, like the breath wafting through and resonating within a wind instrument.

Next foggy day, head down to the Kills.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

10 was just over exactly a year ago, and my first “fog” post fotos were taken over six years ago here.    This autumn dawn brought fog and horns . . . horns that could be heard, with echoes, and felt.  Eukor Morning Conductor seemed asleep to shore folk

as Anna L. Miller motored by.

On the KVK, Gage Paul Thornton chugged to an appointment as Bow Summer , which I last saw in springtime Panama, made all lines fast.

Mary Alice towed more Kills bottom out to sea.

Finally, the loudest and deepest horn came into view.

attached to Americas Spirit, a name of a befogged yet moving vessel which I’ll avoid attributing too much symbolic meaning to.

Taurus passes Robbins Reef Light.

And Americas Spirit came closer.

She was so close to this shore observer that two of her crew could be clearly seen on the bridge wing.

Barbara McAllister spun her stern to put the tanker portside to at the dock.  More of these docking fotos tomorrow.

And Hunting Creek also made her way from Brooklynside to Bayonneside.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was 7.

Below . . . that’s Weddell Sea, last here (second foto from last) in green.  Seeing a vessel like this is not unlike “doctor’s office” nekkid . . . so much more is revealed, and I don’t mean just physical.

To see many more fotos of her afloat, click here.

Amy Moran–telescoped-up-house– was here literally half a year ago.

And four years older and upstate New York-built . . . here’s James Turecamo.

Finally . . . about to be high and dry, here was Barbara McAllister just driving into Dry Dock #1 in the Brooklyn Navy Yard last week.  Click here for a short lecture on Dry dock #1 by a Yale architecture professor.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to get some great high and dry later this week.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

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