You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Atlantic Salvor’ tag.

Random . . .  all fotos taken in the past week, and  . . .  let’s start with a tugboat that’s NOT mostly painted white, the 1958 Thornton Bros.  This foto, courtesy of William Hyman, also shows the color of foliage on the New Jersey bluff across from upper midtown.

0aaaaaaaarrrt

2000 Brooklyn, which also has had a long list of previous names.

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1979 Margaret Moran

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2002 Gramma Lee T Moran

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1974 BF Jersey

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1966 Gulf Dawn

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1979 Patrick J Hunt

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And some fotos of vessels operating by .  ..  1983 Escort

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1969 Robert E McAllister

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1976 Atlantic Salvor.    Notice the tallest building in the distance . . . that’s WTC1.  Eleven months ago, I took these fotos of Salvor steaming int the sixth boro with segments of the antenna that are now assembled and in place atop the tower.

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And once again, the green 1958 tug that started out this post.

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Thanks to William for the first foto;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

I’ve held off moving from 99 to 100 because 100 suggested I do something special, but ultimately, I decided that random means random, so here it is.  Guess the location if not the tug?  It IS sixth boro. Answer at the end of the post.

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Almost 30-year-old Franklin Reinauer  entered the Narrows light as Sun Right departed the other day.

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Less than an hour earlier, Emerald Coast (1973) overtook the same Sun Right at the turn around Bergen Point.   I’ve seen Sun Round recently (although I didn’t take a foto) here but not Sun Road.  Are there more in this Manila-registered series?

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Note the small tug assisting with Energy 11105 barge  . . .

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pushed by (?) Liberty Service.  It’s Freddie K Miller, which I first met as Stapleton Service, even though that was not the first identity for this 1966 built tug.

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Susan Miller (1981) meets Akinada Bridge –named for a Hiroshima bridge–at the Narrows recently.

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Coho lighters G. Agamemnon.  Has repainting started on any of the ex-Penn boats?

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Comet (1977) heads under the Bayonne Bridge, while (?) Brian Nicholas following.

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Atlantic Salvor (1976) followed Atlantic Coast (2007) into the sixth boro the other day.

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Resolute (1975) escorted in  Americas Spirit.

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Finally . . . that first foto . . . it’s Diane B southbound in Eastchester Bay (til now a tugster-neglect portion of the sixth boro) with Throg’s Neck Bridge in the background.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Does anyone know if and when Athena was scrapped?

First, in case you missed the links Lazer One put in the comments section of Arctic Shuttle Tanker, including his profile drawing of that cold weather tanker, check them here.  I’ve also added Lazer One to my links list.

In the foto below, mirage-hovering on the horizon today . . . can you identify the company by color scheme?

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It’s Torm Aslaugh, arriving with ice-caked manifold.   For itinerary of past half year, click here.

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Spray from hawse rinse (if that’s the term) has settled on the bow of Nord Intelligence  before she left port today.

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She was in the sixth boro about six months back.  To see where she’s been since, click here.

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Tanker Venice, before heading out today . . . it looked like she was steam-cleaning her manifold.

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Ice removal perhaps?

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Tugs like Atlantic Salvor and

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Barbara McAllister has their share of

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frosty glaze.

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All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

My library for the time period  January 1, 2012 until today contains 11,244 fotos.  Starting from tomorrow, any 2012 fotos will be taken along the road.  So I decided to choose ONE foto per month, quite subjectively and without regard for this foto having previously been featured here.  I don’t claim these are the best of the month. Only 12 fotos, one per month.

January, Sandmaster . . .  waiting to refuel.  Today, Dec 22 . . .  Sandmaster was out there doing what it usually does, mining sand.

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February . . . Eagle Beaumont escorted in the Arthur Kill by Charles D. McAllister.

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March . . . side by side, CSAV Suape and bulker Honesty, Pacific bound through the Miraflores locks, demonstrating graphically what panamax means.

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April . . . red-trimmed Taurus west bound on the KVK, cutting past Advance Victoria.  And just today, I saw Taurus, now blue-trimmed, heading north between Manhattan and Jersey City.

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Choosing just one foto per month is tough, but for May, here’s Swan packed and almost ready to go hulldown toward Africa with these specimens of the Crowley, Reinauer, and Allied fleets.

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June . . . Weeks Shelby tows shuttle Enterprise from JFK toward Manhattan.

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July and an unforgettable 4th using Pegasus as subject under the rocket’s glare

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August . . . and coal-fired Badger heads into the sunset . . . and Wisconsin.

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September, and a parade of vessels including Urger and Buffalo leave the Federal Lock bound for Waterford.   My inimitable platform here is Fred’s Tug44.

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At the start of the Great Chesapeake Schooner race, crew is setting sail on the unique tugantine Norfolk Rebel.  In the distance, it’s Pride of Baltimore 2.

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Coming into the home stretch from Montreal, it’s Atlantic Salvor delivering segments of the WTC1 antenna.

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And December . . .  it’s Stena Primorsk looming over the USCG vessels.   At this time, Stena Primorsk was impatient to load that first hold with “north dakota crude,” only to experience the malfunction that has left her temporarily disabled upriver, its outer hull gashed open.

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Tomorrow I hit the road . . . gallivanting and visiting season.  I thank all of you for reading, many of you for helping me get these fotos, lots of you for correcting my errors and supplying missing info. Happy New Year and let’s pray for much-needed Peace on Earth . . . .

Here was 15.

Cargoes of all sorts move through the harbor.  One that has always surprised me is this ore from the Congo in the first half of the 20th century.

Here’s a vessel–certainly empty as it was towed to drydock in the old Brooklyn Navy Yard earlier this week.  I missed it but John Watson caught it.  Any ideas?  I believe I saw it in Wilmington back in mid-October.

It’s Falconia of the Corral Line, adapted to carry things that go “moo” in the night.  Stephanie Dann and Ruby M act like drovers to get Falconia into its own private East River corral.  Having grown up on an upstate NY dairy farm, I’d love to see a Corral Line vessel loaded and at sea;  even better, anchored on a calm night in a comfortable harbor.

Here’s an additional shot of the cargo barged in last week from Canada, powered by the inimitable Atlantic Salvor.  The cargo, if you missed last week’s post, is antenna sections for the World Trade Center.

Look closely at that patch of blue on Stolt Emerald‘s port side.

Although not cargo, it is truly unique application of paint . . . surfing penguins.

And finally, look at the frontmost cargo on Zim Virginia.

Here’s sideview of two Ford tow trucks, ones to be operated by wrecker drivers rather than towing officers.  And that’s Barbara McAllister running alongside.

Many thanks to John Watson for the Falconia fotos.

See that empty space way up there?

It’s about to change.    Ten million dollars worth of structure is about to rise.  Nine of the 18 pieces have arrived in the sixth boro aka the harbor of NYC.

Just before noon today,

the cargo turned into the Kill Van Kull, squired in

by DonJon Marine’s

Atlantic Salvor, passing directly in front of the building the antenna soon will adorn.

As I said, watch that open space and when the antenna is planted there,

remember Atlantic Salvor and Witte barge 1407.

All fotos this morning by Will Van Dorp, who wonders how these segments will be transported to lower Manhattan.

Yesterday a goal was to get a better look at this vessel, Ternen.

Her odd posture resulted from some marine variation on a flat tire.

And while I watched, this familiar bulbous bow appeared, headed for sea.  Alice!!  she was in town almost to the day six years after I started this blog.

Almost exactly four years ago I posted this, with a tallying of statistics about two years of watching/studying the empiricals of New York harbor aka the sixth boro.

Thanks to your continued encouragement in the form of reading, commenting, correcting  . . .  I’m still watching life on the most important boro of this port city.

The buffleheads are back, and when I asked, they let on they were really happy they were not gallopavos of any sort.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, no matter any info to the contrary, tomorrow is Blue Friday.    Why blue?  DonJon blue . . . of course.  Atlantic Salvor will be arriving back in the boro towing sections of the WTC antenna.  You can track it here.

How I spent Thanksgiving 22 years ago . ..  in Basra, Iraq . . . click here.

This is the 98th installment of this title.  If you’ve any ideas about what I might do with the 100th, let me know.  Of course, I could just let it pass by . . . randomly.

All these boats have some things in common, like  . ..  they passed through the sixth boro although in all types of weather/light in the past week or so.  I’l let you know what I’m thinking at the end of the post.

Miss Yvette, 1975 built in Houma, Louisiana (LA), here attending to Kraken.

Freddie K Miller, 1966 . . . Madisonville LA.

John P Brown 2002 Morgan City LA

Atlantic Salvor 1976  New Orleans.

James Turecamo 1969, Waterford NY.

Pegasus 2006  Tres Palacios TX

Pathfinder  1972 Houma LA

C. Angelo 1999 Lockport LA

Margaret Moran December 1979 Morgan City LA

Miriam Moran November 1979 Morgan City LA

And another thing they all have in common right now is that

they all work in trades other than directly pushing oil.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’d love to hear ideas about the “Random Tugs 100″ post.

Unrelated:  I read this line yesterday about a withdrawn lawsuit between the NY Port Authority and a Canadian steel company:  “The deal means the lawsuit will be dropped and the steel for the [World Trade Center] tower antenna can set sail before Canadian shipping channels freeze over in winter.”  Here’s the rest of the article.  But it made me wonder . . .  by what vessel . . . barge or ship . . . will this steel arrive in the Upper Bay.  Anyone know?  Here’s info on the fabricator of the antenna.

And a Q . . . has anyone seen evidence of construction of the crane(s) to be involved in the Bayonne Bridge raising?  I’ve heard rumors, but not read or heard anything authoritative.

On most vessels, the color orange is reserved for safety gear;  on others, like

Topeka and Torm Freya it’s the main act.

Other variations of orange as dominant color appear in the harbor as well . . .

like the Staten Island ferries.

The color orange has many other associations in the month of October . . . like leaf color and pumpkins.

Note the difference in visibility here between the departing RORO Topeka and the inbound Atlantic Salvor.

Here were Topeka and an identical fleetmate Totugas back in March.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Here’s another Torm Freya post.  More “orange” tomorrow.

Unrelated:  Thanks to EuroFred for passing along this Youtube that involved a RO-FLO (roll on/float off), three speciality vessels, the orange mud of Surinam, and 608 tires in a story that could be called “cutter head Fitzcarraldo,”  and those are two separate links.

Comet, Eva Leigh Cutler, Manhattan skyline in September 2009.

Ditto . . . . September 11, 2012.

Buildings are replaced,

trade flourishes,

channels are carved deeper,

the open is

closed up,

precautions

are exercised, but

we remember.  Many thanks for the foto below to Capt Jack Joffe, Liberty V of the National Parks Service in the sixth boro.

We heal although scars at times recall pain.

Unrelated:   An NYTimes story about a revival in moving raw product to steel mills on inland waterways.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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