You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Atlantic Salt’ tag.

There are birds . . .  .  like (?) this winter plumage loon and

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this common merganser male.  And

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there are birds . . . here.  The rest of these photos come from Brian DeForest.

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What I’d still like to see this winter is one of these, though.

Many thanks to Brian DeForest for these photos.

 

Just before 0700, Medi Osaka rounded the bend, low in the water as a galleon from the Andean mines.  Only two hours before, under darkness, Medi Osaka‘s soon-to-be berth was still occupied by Global Success, which had just completed discharging its payload of road salt, at least the part of the load gong to Atlantic Salt.

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Many media reports notwithstanding, there is road salt around.  Not all suppliers have been out.

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This clam shell has been steadily emptying out holds.

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Granted the salt has been leaving almost as quickly as it has arrived, but

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count the trucks . . .  a dozen and a half waiting  here . .  and more.

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For JS and others who know the place, yes, I’m atop the salt pile looking down on Leidy’s .  .  . not far from Sailor’s Snug Harbor.

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The trucks are there loading salt from Global Success even before Medi Osaka docks.

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There’s 36 feet of water here and then some.

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Note the crew watch the vessel inch up to the docking barge.

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The next post will show the linemen ferrying the lines to shore crews running them up to the bollards.

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Meanwhile, temperatures were almost to 50 F by the time I left here.

What’s this?  Answer follows.

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Ice . .  we love it in some drinks.  but on rivers and roads, it’s a nuisance.  Ice breakers try to keep strategic waterways open, and on roadways, salt is the weapon, but when the storehouse floor looks like this and

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and this, then you pray for another replenishment.   By the way, the top photo looks down into this hold from the exterior.

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Geography and time are  impediments, but so are well-intentioned regulations, as explained in this article.  We’re still a month from the start of spring this year, and according to the article embedded in the previous sentence, the state of NJ–I don’t know the info for NYC or NY–has used 1.5 times the amount of salt used all last winter.

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Many thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt for all the photos in this post.

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These photos were taken on M/V Rhine last week.

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Currently the next vessel has arrived and  . . . more are in the offing.

Many thanks to Brian for these photos.

It’s high time for me to reread Kurlansky’s Salt.

Here was the first time I used this title, which clearly needs to be used again.

Let me start here at 13:38.  Note from far to near, or black hull to black hull . . . Cartagena, Four Sky with Lee T Moran, Red Hook, and Genco Knight.

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Twin Tube slides through the opening between Bow Kiso and Genco Knight.

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Even the bow of Genco Knight is crowded as their vessel prepares to dock and resupply the salt depot.

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Kimberly Turecamo works the bulk carrier’s stern as Evening Star passes with B. No. 250.

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Add McAllister Girls in the foreground and Ellen McAllister in the distance against the blue hull, which will appear a bit later.

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McCrews heads westbound and Four Sky now seems to be doing the same.

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Are you out of breath yet?  Only 10 minutes has elapsed.

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Linehandler 1 cruises blithely through it, supremely self-assured.

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Cheyenne adds color.

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Another line handler boat scouts out the set up . . . as a new blue hull arrives from the west, as

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. .  . does Charles D. McAllister.

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Crew on the blue hull–Nord Observer–stows lines as they head for tropical heat, escorted

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by Catherine Turecamo although

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at the turn on the Con Hook range they meet Mare Pacific heading in with Joan Turecamo and Margaret  Moran.  At this point . . .

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14:12 . . .  the mergansers decided to hightail it . . . or at least follow their crests.  And I hadn’t even turned around yet to see the congestion on land behind me.

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All these photos in a very short time by Will Van Dorp.

My thanks to Brian DeForest and Atlantic Salt, whom Genco Knight was arriving to restock.

Here was a post about a dense traffic day as well as a busy day.

Rhine is currently in port offloading salt given the reported shortage of the material.

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Lines were made fast Monday midday, just after Balder had left.

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In the past six days, Balder had come and discharged its dozens of thousands of tons of the stuff and gone.  As Corey Kilgannon reports in the first sentence of his recent NYTimes article, “Pass the salt, please” describes the business plan here.

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This is what international trade looks like, whether it be Islandia heading out under a leaden-gray afternoon or

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these unidentified vessels departing recently at dawn.  In the photo above, the dry-docked vessel in the background is USNS Pomeroy, T-AKR 316.

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The first three photos are used with permission of Brian DeForest.  The others are by Will Van Dorp. And obviously, none of these photos were taken today, as another type of white stuff descends upon the harbor.

Here was 5 in this series.

This is the view from the bridge looking forward on Key Frontier, built 2011 in Maizuru, Japan.  From this point to the bow is 638′ and to the stern is about 100′.   Note the approaching tug and barge.


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The length on the tug is 64′ .

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The orange tanker in the distance is 800′.  See the crewman standing  on the edge of hold #4 just to the left of the green half mark for the helipad?  He’s around 6′.

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He’s a spotter for activity below inside the hold.

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The bucket can hold holds 30 tons when full.

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When a hold is just about empty, a loader is lowered to assist in filling the bucket.

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These trucks can hold up to 40 tons.  The ship transports between 50 and 60 thousand tons.

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Safe driving on the ice.

All Fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to Brian DeForest for access to the process.

Here Key Frontier‘s itinerary for the past six months:

2014 January 23rd, 14:30:44 UTC New York /u.s.a.
2013 December 26th, 12:00:22 UTC Tocopilla /chile
2013 November 19th, 22:00:34 UTC Roberts Banks
2013 November 19th, 22:00:25 UTC Roberts Banks
2013 November 19th, 22:00:14 UTC English Bay Anch.
2013 October 21st, 10:00:12 UTC Lanshan/china
2013 August 19th, 19:00:37 UTC Mejillones/chile
2013 August 9th, 15:00:13 UTC Cristobal,panama
2013 July 31st, 15:00:14 UTC Baltimore/usa
2013 July 12th, 21:30:58 UTC Rotterdam/netherland

Roberts Bank and English Bay are both in British Columbia.

The link here may show the first glimpse I had of Balder.  Let me share my getting better acquainted, but first . . . the foto below I took 13 months ago.  Note the different colors of salt, reflecting

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different provenances, as explained in Ian Frazier’s New Yorker article below.  Buy a copy to get the rest of the story.

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Without this vessel, all of us who drive the roads or walks the sidewalks and streets within the metropolis surrounding the sixth boro would be at greater risk of slipping and crashing.  Framed that way, Balder could not be better named.   Here’s what Kimberly Turecamo looks like from Balder‘s bridge.

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On the far side of the channel, that’s Dace.

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Here’s what has come forth from Balder‘s belly, a bit of the Atacama Desert on the KVK.   Huge tractors load the trucks that come to a highway department near you today.

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This 246′ arm, reaching nearly to Richmond Terrace, offloads at the relatively slow rate of 8oo tons per hour.

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And here’s the hold just emptied, one hold of five.  Notice the ladders and the tracks at the base of the hold.

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Click here to see the unloading machinery in action.

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Navel, perhaps?

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Here’s what gets even the last pound making up the nearly 50,000-ton payload onto the salt dock.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt and the Balder crew for the tour.

I could have called this a “scale” post, but I wanted to keep the thread.  The next two fotos were taken over a hundred years ago;  I used them back in 1989 in a now out-of-print book called Incomplete Journeys.  It was about shipwrecks in or near the mouth of the Merrimack River in Massachusetts.  The fotos show not salt but sand being loaded onto a schooner.  The vessel would be run onto the “sand pile” bank at high tide, loaded, and then floated off the next high tide.

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These ships were called sand droghers there, although that usage doesn’t seem very widespread.   But I digress.

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Let’s return to Port Newark, United Challenger, and salt.

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61,000 tons of salt arrived on this ship.

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Two men in cranes emptied the ship in about five days.

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That involved an additional eight men driving trucks to the mountain.

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Time lapse photography might be fun.

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Notice the spiral staircase into the hold.  Also, this hatch is midships;  the bridge is quite a distance away.

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Double click to enlarge (most fotos) this foto and just to the left of the Newark Bay Bridge, you’ll see WTC1.

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This is taken from just forward of the first hatch, counting from the bow.

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This is the bridge view.

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This parting shot is from the starboard bridge wing.

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Safe driving on icy roads.

All fotos (except the first two, of course)  by Will Van Dorp.   Many thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt.

Timbuktu?  Taudenni?    Has tugster gone back way west?

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A buried ship?

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Nah . . . See the Newark Bay Bridge in the background and if you look carefully just under the open clamshell in the center of the foto, you might spot WTC1 in Manhattan.

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Here’s a closer up of United Challenger–now back at sea and bound for Norfolk, actually Newport News, I think, to load coal.    See the WTC1 between the crane cab and the bridge?

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The workday is getting under way.

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Clamshells drop the salt into the loader.

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Huge trucks loaded with relatively small increments of the 61,000 ton cargo transport the road salt to

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the top of the mountain.

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Here you’re looking from the ship at–I’d guess–at least a million tons of road salt.

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And these are one of two sets of hands that unload the ship by controlling

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clamshell buckets this size.  Think of these places, ships, and crews when next you’re driving on icy roads.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More soon.   Many thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt for permission to get these fotos.

Tangentially related:  Check out this article in the NYTimes about my friend John Skelson.

FedEx in the sky, container barge at the ASI yard on this side, Donjon Marine yard on the other side, and off the end of the channel, highways and railways.  By the way, Fred Smith has long been one of my heros.

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EWR is one of three very busy airports in greater New York.

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Note the control tower at the airport.  Check that link for a view of the whole complex from the air.

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And the ship . . .  since 1 September, here’s a list of ports it has called in:   Balikpapan,   Yeosu,   Huanghua,  Aviles (maybe) , Red Dog Mine, and who knows where else.  And some of the crew . . . are dreaming of visiting Times Square and Rockefeller tonight.

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And if this is Port Newark, then next it’s Norfolk.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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