You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Vinik Marine’ category.

Here was 1.

Bob Stopper sends along this foto from Sodus Bay on Lake Ontario.  Miss Debbie,  1969, was originally 30′ but extended to 46′.

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Here’s a bow shot I took a few years back.

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The Bronx and W. O. Decker here headed up along the west side of Manhattan before the 2010 Hudson River tug race.  Click here to see a clip called Bootleggers Return to the Bronx, re-enacting a 1922 federal raid on a barge where “hootch” was sold.   The clip was sent along by Robert Apuzzo, who samples the bottle on the bow of the tug in the clip.

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From the 2008 Hudson River tug race, Terilou, I believe.   I know nothing about Terilou‘s past or present, although it may be tied up on the Raritan River.

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And here’s a boat i just stumbled onto .  . .  Cynthia Garner.  Anyone know her story?

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The first foto comes compliments of Bob Stopper, the eyes on western NY waterways.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Some folks do spring cleaning;  I do winter culling.  And have been doing a lot of it, including in my foto library.  Considering the library as a whole, it’s constantly in flux . . . stuff out; better stuff-I hope–in.  Many quotes say this;  my favorite version is “you cannot step into the same river twice.”

Same is true of a harbor; what vessels inhabited it when I first paid attention are no longer here, at least not in the same way.  Take Odin, about which I’ve heard a lot of chatter this week.  Great name.  Perfect candidate for an award for eccentricity, but I smiled every time I saw Odin.   I never saw the closest vessel to her in DNA, the ill-fated Red Wing.  You can tell this is the older Odin because the house rests on a hydraulic ram.

 Here her house has front legs.

Here’s Odin, house down, bunkering a Princess vessel.

Dean Reinauer has also left the sixth boro; she traveled out on the back of Blue Marlin last summer.  Where she is today, I’m SURE she’ll see no snowfall like this, taken a few years back over by Howland Hook.

Ditto Great Gull . . . down in Venezuela . . . no snow.  I recall fondly how excited I was when I first saw Great Gull, turns out built by the same folks who built barges for Europe as part of the Marshall Plan.

And the ORANGE June K.  I know she’s still around as Sarah Ann.  But that original color was almost institutional, almost spring time.

And then there’s Rosemary McAllister, now working on lease down south without her last name and with an all-white stack.    Her christening was a seminal bowsprite/tugster collaboration.

She worked in the harbor for too short a spell, from my POV, before migrating to Houston, but what do I know about the economics.

Scott C is now Weddell Sea.  Dorothy Elizabeth (star  . . . well, an extra . . .  of Carlito’s Way) has now been scrapped.

Finally, there’s Kristin . . . , once with a telescoping house like Odin, now scrapped.

I have others, but it’s amazing how much changes in five years of  observing the harbor.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Given my vintage, the sound that personifies change for me is this song by Jefferson Airplane.  

Here was H & D 6.

Thanks to Stuart, Harold, and “Ann O’Numess”  for identifying the Kosnac tug steaming past Riker’s in Carlito’s Way.  Here’s a foto I took three years ago, and below I took of Dorothy Elizabeth (1951)  in Tottenville a month ago.  Might she really already be slivers of scrap?

Hercules (1963), sibling of Maverick and others, awaits her emigration with

the return of Blue Marlin.  Note Alert (1976) in the lower left.

Matthew Tibbetts (1966) was high and

dry on Saturday.

With unusually high exhaust, that’s Marlin (1974)  on left and Penn No. 6 (1970)  beside her.   No one has yet told me how designers decide to run such long exhausts v. equally serviceable short ones.  Sea Raven is another high-exhaust vessel.

Click here to see Kathleen Turecamo in its element, not where it stood last weekend.

Barents Sea (right) and Na Hoku  . . . I wonder how long they’ve spent tied up here.  I recall feeling excited when I first spotted Barents (1976) more than three years back, and Na Hoku (1981) used to work the California-Hawaii run, but I can tell you when she last floated on Pacific water.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who DOES reduce foto resolution before posting them here.

The idea here comes from the “eyed but not seen until it’s noticed” department.  I noticed the Brooklyn church on the hill behind Linda Moran only recently.  I’ve no doubt I’d seen it many times before, but my glance never lingered there.  Now, I am unable to NOT see it.  It is the basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, OLPH, for short.    Between Linda and OLPH is the Brooklyn Army Terminal, designed by the legendary Cass Gilbert.

This got my wondering about other churches visibly prominently  from the sixth boro.    Like St. Michael’s in Sunset Park, Brooklyn.  I know some might find this heretical, but as a newbie in the sixth boro, I considered the possibility that the 200′ egg-tipped spire might be a minaret.

Just forward of Megan McAllister is St. Mary Star of the Sea in Bayonne, as seen from Richmond Terrace, Staten Island.

Just above Ellen McAllister‘s stacks, Our Lady of Mount Carmel is mostly obscured here by the IMTT tanks.

St Peter’s in New Brighton, Staten Island can’t be missed.

Just astern of Kristy Ann Reinauer, St Patrick’s in Elizabeth, New Jersey, has two spires.  The single white spire to the right of the courthouse tops First Presbyterian on Broad Street in Elizabeth, a congregation going back to 1664.

From this 2007 foto, it’s Riverside

Church in Manhattan.  In the foto above, left to right:  Dorothy Elizabeth, Patapsco, Lucy Reinauer, and unknown.  Can anyone identify this Moran boat below?  Answer below.

And since I’m asking, here’s a church along the Brooklyn side of East River aka Easy River, taken in 2007, I cannot identify.  Anyone help?

If you wish to add other church landmarks, let me know.

All fotos here, Will Van Dorp.

Moran boat below Riverside Church is Paul T. Moran, answer thanks to Allen Baker.

First this, . . . from a certain waterblogger I tandempost with,  about a Saturday gathering.

The Dann Ocean towing boat below bore no identifying info.  At first I wondered if it was Allie B returned from Romania, but it seemed smaller than Allie B.  An erudite reader helped me identify it.  Answer follows.

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Here’s another shot, with Dorothy Elizabeth on the Staten Island side.

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I posted Outrageous a year ago here moving a barge on the hip westbound on the East River.   Just today, thanks to Bob Beegle on the tugboats yahoo group I learned it’s the ex-Maya “built in 1981 by Dravo Steelship for Apex Towing Company (Apex Oil), as a shallow draft tug capable of working both inland and coastal waters and fitted with both steering and flanking rudders.  Reportedly very maneuverable.”  Great name, unusual profile.

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Brian Nicholas 1966 (ex-Banda Sea, Jenna B., Bunker Tide, Dad II)  pushes

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a scow.  Note:  Dad is an acronym.  Expansion comes tomorrow.

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Approaching is Dorothy Elizabeth 1951! (ex-Gotham and Christine Gellatly) with its unmistakeable color scheme.

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And we’ll end as we started with a Dann Ocean Towing boat . . .  but this one is identified:  Thomas Dann 1975 (ex-Yabucoa Service, Yabucoa, Yabucoa Sun), named for a town in southeastern Puerto Rico.

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Here’s another shot of Thomas Dann.

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So if you identified that first boat as Comet, you’d be right.  Thanks to Harold E. Tartell for the ID.  I ran a foto of Comet here a year ago.

I hadn’t planned to post on Charles Oxman again, but I felt encouraged by emails and  recollection of a discussion board last year or overhearing in conversation someone comparing the visorless wheelhouse to the conning tower of a cold war submarine . . . aaaacox

Oxman, then known as Falk was designed that way back in 1940.  Were other visorless siblings also built for some specific purpose?  Was Falk a one-off wheelhouse design?  I’ve also  always wondered about the choice of “Falk” as this vessel’s name:

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“Falk” is the title of a 1901 short story by my all-time top five writers, Joseph Conrad.  Read the short story here. “Falk” happens to be a recollection of events in life of a British tugboat captain working in Thailand a century ago.

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Back to Oxman, the vessel is named for a community college professor as related in this article I’ve always liked.  A close-up of Oxman (go here and click click on foto)  shows another name Oxman‘s carried, St. Petersburg,  which

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–though unrelated–is similar to the name of this vessel.  I took this foto in Kingston almost a year ago.    Petersburg, I believe, is the tug I couldn’t identify at the end of the post here on QE2′s final departure from the sixth boro back last October.

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Back to Oxman, this Pusey and Jones tug also went by the name A P St Philip.  Anyone have fotos of the vessel bearing these names?

Vinik‘s Charles Oxman enters the west end of the KVK;  that’s Elizabethport, NJ, in the background.  I couldn’t tell if Gotham was on board.

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West bound  Atlantic Coast yesterday found no ice to break on the KVK as it passes Seapowet (Seapower with part of a letter missing?) and Sunny Express (nearer tanker).

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Charles D. McAllister, passing bowsprite’s cliff two weeks ago, will encounter ice some dozens of miles upriver.

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Capt. Tom idled last summer in Erie Basin (Brooklyn), and I know nothing more about the vessel.

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Amy C McAllister (often sounding like A-B-C) waited for the Arthur Kill Lift Bridge to . . . lift two weeks ago.

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And my parting shot shows Elena, a small independent tug leaving Gowanus Canal.  I took this shot in December 2007.  If my info is correct, Elena is a 25′ loa,  out of the Bronx, and built in 1949.

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In winter my metabolism and outdoor activity slow a bit, and  I go through my archives.

If you have more time to linger in front of the computer this time of year, scroll up the image of Henry Hudson (guy with frilly fashion statement around his neck), click on his nose, and read what I imagine he was doing 400 years ago, at the start of his eventful third voyage.

Finally, for follow-up on Weeks 2 story about the locomotives, check this link, compliments of the friendly folks at Working Harbor Committee.   I have another Weeks story coming up on Friday.

So through the magic of blogging, let’s turn time back and shift camera position, kind of like the movie Groundhog Day.  Or “TR 2008  . . . Take 2.”  The crew of W. O. Decker–the only tug in the harbor taking paying passengers–coordinate to rope a bollard.  By the way, W. O. took first place in best mascot . . . and guesses what it was?  Answer follows.

Truth must out . . . these fabuous fotos were captured by Brian, also intrepid captain of Puffin.  Below, Charles Oxman pushes around Rosemary . . . until Rosemary turns on all her 6000 hp.  The Oxman takes my first prize for the most unusual house design AND best namesake.  Bravo Vinik!

Brian gets a prize for catching the drama of nose-to-nose gladiating (I’m sure that’s not a word til now) with Edith Thornton, who saved all its grit for this, twisting it up with St. Andrew.

Best-looking tug in the harbor . . . Matthew Tibbetts.  Anyone know its namesake?

And one more shot for today of “sturm und drang” as portrayed by speed winners, Ross Sea and Maryland.

Oh . . . about the best mascot:  beating out a disqualified tattoo queen, a ferret, a large dog and a puppy, and some very happy clams . . . winner was an East River spider crab.  Does it have a name?  A special snack for winning?  Check back later.

Daily News reports the news here, even dragging in some Yankees-RedSox causality.

OK . .  last addition for today, thanks to Bernie of the Working Harbor Committee, someone who loves spinach . . . although I still suspect it’s seaweed.  Either way, he’s gonna grow up strong.

days left . . . and three fotos. Up close . . . with Dorothy Elizabeth. Will mascot Gotham appear this year?

Will the mystifying Odin take part, and if so, house up or down?

And will Susan Miller, below shown in a backwater of Brooklyn, be tag teamed with Catherine C?

A shot from last year’s race, and

… here’s Sunday’s schedule.

9:30 a.m. – Spectator Boat departs Pier 83 (boarding begins at 9 a.m.); advance reservation necessary*

10 a.m. – Parade of Tugboats starts at Pier 84

10:30 a.m. – Race begins near W.72nd Street & Hudson River

11 a.m. to Noon – Nose-to-nose pushing contests and line-toss
competition

Noon to 1 p.m. – Tugboats and crews gather at Pier 84
Spinach-eating contest (SPINACH???? Dulse might be more appropriate.)

1 p.m. Awards for the above PLUS best tattoo and other fascinating qualities.

* The spectator boat will depart at 9:30 a.m. sharp from Circle
Line’s Pier 83 at 43rd Street and the Hudson River. The boat will
join in the tugboat parade and provide the closest view of the action
as the tugs race down the river at full throttle and then go nose-to-
nose in the nautical version of an arm-wrestling contest. Tickets are
$35 adults/$30 children and seniors (free to members of the press on
assignment). Advance tickets can be purchased online at
www.workingharbor.org or by calling: 212-757-1600.

Admission to the Pier 84 events is free.

Here’s the complete press release from Working Harbor.

Surprises might be debut of a new tractor tug. Maybe an award for the crewman most resembling King Neptune?

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My job . . . Summer 2014

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