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. . . sometimes aka Kate’s Light.   And I did a Katherine Walker post here without including the light in that post.   So here’s my attempt at amends.  All Robbins Reef today . . .

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The tug Robbins Reef is an ex-army tug, sibling of 8th Sea, built in 1953 in Fells Point at American Electric Welding.  Can anyone add info on the former American Electric Welding shipyard?  National also appears to be a sibling, but I am starting to digress.

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Back to the light by that name . . . in the distance.

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See you at the Noble Maritime auction tonight, I hope.

Sunrise to the left of Coney Island Light and tug Escort, a Jakobson boat.  Note how calm the water is.

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The mighty Resolute passing the lofty Chesapeake Coast, with a loftier tower off in the distance.

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James Turecamo–a Matton boat– tailing Stolt Aquamarine

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Gulf Dawn with GL 54

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Escort six hours after the lead foto . .  notice what 22+ knot wind out of the west does.  That’s Taft Beach disappearing  behind the island.

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And Potomac heads eastbound.  I’m thinking to use Robbins Reef light as the terminal punctuation for all posts this week.  Do you remember these signs that used a product name in the same way?  I’m gathering if you are over 55 and a US resident, you’ll know about Burma Shave.  Otherwise, you’ll think I’ve lost it again.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, this morning.

And check out this Staten Island Advance story on Robbins Reef light rehab work, featuring my foto!

Barney Turecamo with barge Georgia  and

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Buchanan 12 light, under the same wintry sky.  The last time I saw the 12 was back when tugster last took a swimming day.  I’d love to see the high and dry hulls of Barney and Mary.

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Franklin Reinauer and Taft Beach leaving Erie Basin and

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Franklin here refueling with Ruth M.

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Robert E. McAllister, passing where warehouses are being transformed into park equipment and

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Passing the cranes at the former Military Ocean terminal it’s Mary Gellatly and headed the other way

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Marjorie B. McAllister.

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Joyce D. Brown westbound past IMTT and here a few minutes later Joyce with

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Meredith C. Reinauer right behind.

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Shelby slings some barges and

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magnificent Maryland –as seen from a low angle–made to the dock.

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A Vane unit . . . I don’t recall and can’t identify . . . a few minutes after sunrise.

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All fotos taken the past month by Will Van Dorp.

Random . . .  all fotos taken in the past week, and  . . .  let’s start with a tugboat that’s NOT mostly painted white, the 1958 Thornton Bros.  This foto, courtesy of William Hyman, also shows the color of foliage on the New Jersey bluff across from upper midtown.

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2000 Brooklyn, which also has had a long list of previous names.

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1979 Margaret Moran

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2002 Gramma Lee T Moran

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1974 BF Jersey

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1966 Gulf Dawn

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1979 Patrick J Hunt

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And some fotos of vessels operating by .  ..  1983 Escort

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1969 Robert E McAllister

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1976 Atlantic Salvor.    Notice the tallest building in the distance . . . that’s WTC1.  Eleven months ago, I took these fotos of Salvor steaming int the sixth boro with segments of the antenna that are now assembled and in place atop the tower.

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And once again, the green 1958 tug that started out this post.

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Thanks to William for the first foto;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

I’d planned something else for today, but when Brian DeForest, terminal manager of Atlantic Salt, sent along these fotos –taken Sunday from a unique perspective, I scrapped my erstwhile plan. See the orange details in the foreground?

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These are fotos from the ship, which is currently moving at 10 to 11 knots southbound off Cape May.   That’s the Bayonne Bridge and

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here’s the arm conveying salt onto the pile.

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I’m sure this has a technical term, but I’ll call it the bracket that supports the arm when not in use.

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And here’s a view into the traveling wheelhouse and

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the hold.

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Here is engine room info.

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Finally, here’s Quantico Creek as seen from the bridge wing.

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Here’s a foto I took nearly six years ago on the KVK looking off the starboard bow of a large vessel of another time–a century ago–that used to engage in a salt trade out of Chile.   Know the vessel?

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Answer:  Peking.  Here’s one of six posts I did about that transit of Peking from Caddell’s back to South Street Seaport Museum waters.

Many thanks to Brian DeForest for all these fotos, except the last one.

A thought just occurs to me:  Chile’s main salt port today is Patache.  Could that word be a Spanish spelling/pronunciation of the word “potash”?

Here was part a of this series.  Twelve hours after arrival, Balder could already be 25,000 tons lighter, although I’m not sure at this writing at what hour of darkness the discharge began.

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But in daylight as by night, the Cats labor to keep the salt piled for maximum space efficiency.  Since I’ve not done it, I can only imagine what a time lapse of the unloading process–in say 60 seconds–would look like as the great orange hull rises in the water as a mountain–with Cats scrambling laboriously– grows on shore.

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Periodically the flow of salt stops along this nearly 300′ long arm, and

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the traveling deckhouse,  covering the unloading machinery and keeping the process virtually dustless, trundles over a still loaded portion of the hold.   The fotos below come from the MacGregor site.

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Notice the Empire State Building–almost 10 miles distant– in the foto below, just down and to the left from the starboard side lifeboat.

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Here’s another shot showing Balder‘s traveling deckhouse.

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Salt goes off the portside while fuel enters to starboard from

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Doubleskin 33 squired by –here–Quantico Creek.

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All fotos–and narrative–by Will Van Dorp, who is solely responsible for any factual errors and who is grateful to Brian DeForest for permission to observe and take fotos of this process.  I’d also LOVE to accompany Balder for the six-week 6000-mile voyage to the Chilean desert for more seasonings to tame your wintry commute.

Returning to the foto above, notice the creamy colored hull intruding from the right . . . well, more on that tomorrow.

Postscript:  Balder might have loaded this salt in Patache, in northern Chile.  Click here for a CSL article on Balder’s South American bulk trades.

 

Random, recent, and variously sourced.

The closeup of Nanticoke pushing Doubleskin 57 toward the Goethals Bridge below comes compliments of Allen Baker.

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I took this foto of Robert E. McAllister.

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Marie J. Turecamo here assists Barney Turecamo, pushing

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the 118,000 barrel barge Georgia.

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Four of the Dann Marine tugs:  l to r, Emerald, Chesapeake in the distance, First,  and Calusa . . . all Coast.

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Pegasus . . . the former John E. McAllister and so much more . . . the only tug in the sixth boro that today still excurses (yup . .  that’s a word!) for the public.

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First Coast, the former

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Morania No. 18 . . .  See the traces of “R–A–N” in the painted metal?

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Over in the East River, it’s Bruce A. and

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Charles D. McAllister.   See the McAllister striped Rosenwach wooden water tank on the building upper skyline left?

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From l’amiga .  .  it’s another shot of Patricia, a 1963 tug built in Port Deposit, MD.

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And last but not least . . .  just cellphone-snapped by chance by Birk Thomas yesterday, it’s Miss Lis, which at this writing is about to steam past Sandy Hook on her way out of the sixth boro.  What’s remarkable about this foto is that Birk caught this Tradewinds tug in the last two miles of a journey that started in LA!   I feel like there should be a brass band playing or some other celebration of completion.   Click here to my previous “seeing” of another Tradewinds tug.

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Click on this foto below . . . and if you have a Facebook account, you should be able to see Tradwinds Towing’s FB page.

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Fotos should be credited as I tried to indicate;  non credited ones by Will Van Dorp.

And the winner of the speed race . . .

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in a record setting 0 days, 0 hours, and precisely five minutes and 0 seconds . . ..

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. . . sorry . . .  this is part of the day too; click on the foto for bowsprite’s rare foto coverage.

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The winner   of the speed event will be revealed, uncovered, somewhat shorn  . . . at the end of this post.  But first, besides the tattoo contest, other contests include line toss.

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Jamie of Susan Miller shows how it’s done.

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Then . .  there’s sanctioned, precision pushing.

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Can you spot the difference between the white-and-green tug to the right above and the one below?

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Vane had twins in the race, and one near-clone.

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I’m not sure what this event would be called . . . mustering maybe.

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There’s sizing up and

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retreat.

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On the pier, winners wear not laurels but spinach . . . .  Someone inspired by the anthropological study of the Nacirema people might write this up as a study of a late summer ritual called Ecar Toabgut.

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There are raffles that landed some this bowsprite print of a boat that represents–I believe–the first Vane participation in this race on

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September 2, 2007.

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And after the race–if it hadn’t happened before–boats might pose with the great Lady.

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Here are some of the crew of the fastest boat . . .

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Resolute.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Congratulations to the crew of Working Harbor Committee for their work;  many thanks to all the companies and crews for participating.

And let’s make this Tubing Tuesday, with a video of the race in NYC, the one in Gloucester and this tour in port of Antwerpen . . al  this same weekend.

Uh . . . what’s this?

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It’s Buddy, living breathing braying hoof-beglittered mascot of Debora Miller.  If you’ve never been to the New York’s race, there’s a best mascot category.  In the past there’ve been  . . . dogs, hermit crabs, even a chicken . . . but Buddy redefines the contest.

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With the threat of rain, someone made a wise decision and advanced the start of the race.  Here Resolute, Catherine Miller, Tasman Sea, and Red Hook move toward the starting line . . . feted by now-retired 1931 fireboat John J. Harvey.

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Foto thanks to William Hyman . . . the line up.

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And at 10:29:30 . . . they’re off . . . with 1930 wooden tug W. O. Decker taking an early and easy lead!!

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45 seconds later . . . W. O. Decker has dropped back.

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Here’s they are 15 seconds later.

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John J. Harvey is not a tug, but to see the speed out of this octogenarian . . . was humbling.   An engineer toiling away in the engine room later told me all four engines were driving propulsion.

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The red tug–Resolute–went on to win, although I don’t yet have the official times.  I could have written them down, but I was far too busy applauding and taking fotos.

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And here’s the crowd at the finish line.

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Part B tomorrow.  Thanks to William Hyman for foto 4.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Many thanks to Glen Miller of Miller’s Launch for my ride this year.

Unrelated and almost forgot:  Here’s a query from Jeff S, a frequent commenter on this blog:  he saw a “very weather beaten wooden sailing vessel (hull) at the Jersey end of the Goethels Bridge, about 65-70 foot long , two deck cabins and a bowsprit.”  It was parked in the oversize lot waiting to cross the Bridge when traffic gets light.  Anyone have an idea what this may be?

 

This summer has taken me to memorable places and points in time, one of which was this comparison of the NJ-side Holland Tunnel vents today and thirty years ago.

This morning as I walked to a meeting on the Lower West Side of Manhattan, I took this set of fotos, all within a quarter mile . . .  More time travel?

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Here’s a perspective of Lilac and Pilot from an angle that was not available–due to construction–as recently as two months ago.  Click here (foto #11) for more info on Pilot, the 1941 tug along Lilac‘s starboard side.

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Fair early morning sun illuminates tug Red Hook and the CRRNJ building, seen here 30 years ago.

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Brendan Turecamo passes the Hoboken Terminal, originally completed in 1907.   For a look at what’s behind the Terminal, click here.

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Tailing Brendan Turecamo was El Galeon Andalucia, presumably headed south for Puerto Rico and Florida.

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In Spanish . . . is the phrase “Felices vientos,”  I’m wondering . . .  Also, is El Galeon Andalucia the same vessel that I saw a half year ago in San Juan then called Galeon La Pepa?

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All fotos taken this morning between 7:30 and 8:30 by Will Van Dorp.

 

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