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Here were 11, which clarifies the title . ..  I hope.

I’ve had these fotos from Seth Tane for quite some time.  I looked at them today while culling fotos from my library.  Foto shows Foss tugs moving the Sauvie Island Bridge span into position near Portland, Oregon.  Foss tugs visible are (I believe)  the larger PJ Brix and Jim Moore.

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This foto also shows Daniel Foss. The bridge move happened in late December 2007;  see page 6 of this Foss publication.  Looking up info on the Sauvie Island Bridge, I stumbled on the clever Flickr assemblage of fotos with the string “island bridge” in the name.  Try playing with it to see bridges with those two words juxtaposed from everywhere.

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Like I said, I was scrolling through and culling my 2008 fotos.  Joan McAllister . . .  haven’t seen it in a long time.

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Ditto Crow.  Has she been scrapped?

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Here’s a summer 2008 treat, tandem pushing Aegean Sea and Caribbean Sea, although still on Roehrig colors.  The K-Sea colors on both have yet to come and by now both have been repainted.

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Later in summer 2008 I took this, M/T Great Gull . . . now operating near the Panama Canal.

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And  . . . last one for today, Odin passing the stern of ITB Groton, also sold foreign. ITBs like Groton, obsolete now, were technically catamaran tugs.  Just forward of where the stream of water is exiting the hull is the “bow” of the tug;  look above it and you’ll see the “seam” where tug and barge conjoin.   I posted about ITBs here back in late November 2007, and since

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I’ve been enhancing my fotos on this blogs, let me add a few to that post here.  Here I’m looking between the “hulls” of the catamaran and toward the stern.  Note the portside prop.  For scale, note the size of the “lift basket” and yard worker.  The aftmost portside portion of the “barge” fits into the groove.

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Here’s the aftmost port starboard side of the barge.  These two fotos were taken in the Brooklyn Navy Yard GMD November 2007.

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Thanks much to Seth for starting this 2007/08 flashback.  I feel like a veritable John Titor after this glance back at how much the harbor has changed in five years.  All fotos except otherwise attributed, are mine.

And totally unrelated . . . prepare to laugh yerself buttless  bad lip reading the NFL.   This one is a guaranteed laugh-producer too . . . what they really said in the first debate.

Here’s 3.

Cape Washington left today, following in the wake of Lia.  Zim Beijing came in;  I’m guessing “my” Bebedouro will leave soon, and the pace of ins-outs is such that I have to content myself seeing in on AIS.

Although I’m intrigued with names and itineraries like OOCL Oakland and

Zim Qingdao back here yesterday,

traffic longterm runs together and

goes out of focus and even

blurs.

For a moment, that is.  HS Livingstone entered the harbor Saturday morning, and by midmorning Sunday, it’s off Atlantic City making for Baltimore.

In

in

inbound, then outbound  .  . .

I wonder about the blur for the mariner of these global box vessels.  Here’s a question I have insufficient info to answer:  Pick a year like 1940, and the number of dockworkers that year per ton of cargo transferred between ship and shore.  Now compare the tonnage of freight handled on the docks of NYC in 1940 and 2012 and thereby calculate how many dockworkers would be needed in 2012 using the 1940 dockworker/ton rate.  And why?  Check out this article in today’s NYTimes called “…Rise of the Machines.”

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Recognize the profile?  The gulls swarmed as harbingers, like those that preceded Moby’s rise from the depths?  Doubleclick enlarges.

She comes in like a discriminating predator, leaving Patuxent and Brownsville to continue on their various ways.  I do wonder if any crew on those vessels got any fotos.

As she passes Swinburne and Hoffman, her anchor dangles at the ready, like a claw.

She inches into the deepwater to

settle in and lie in wait.  That’s Stephen passing far on the east side of the channel.

Let’s hope things go faster than they did six months back.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More soon.

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A lot has happened here in 10 days, although the fotos here reveal none of it.  The sixth boro has its way of obscuring change, seasonal or otherwise.  I know folks within 10 miles of this waterway who have no power yet and who have tossed to curb-side trash picker-uppers most of their water-befouled furniture, appliances, books, etc.

But along the KVK, Chem Antares (ex-Sichem Unicorn) transfers fluids,  while

Torm Sara waits to do the same.  [Doubleclick enlarges most fotos.]

Kings Point Liberator inspects other vessels along the KVK.  I’d never guessed she had a wooden hull.

Sarah Dann froths eastbound.

My shot is a half second late as splash dissipates from this Ken’s Marine boat.

Note the water color here from  Marie J Turecamo and from

Ellen Bouchard.

Anyone identify this crew boat?

To get a sense of scale on ATB Freeport, note the two crew outside the wheelhouse.

So far, Freeport is the only of the US Shipping Partners 12,000 hp ATBs.  Some years back, I was fortunate to have caught one of their ITBs–Philadelphia- high and dry, here and here.  For an update on Philadelphia‘s current location/status, read Harold’s comment below.  Thanks, much . . . Harold.

Skiff in the foreground seems to be capturing flotsam planks for reuse.

Oh, by the way, four days  from now will be the sixth boro’s 19th annual tugboat race.  See you there?

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

The sixth boro really does not have that many tugboats doing ship assist work, so when I see McAllister Responder and Ellen McAllister  move in this formation, no matter the weather, it can mean only one thing . . .

ship assist.  Chemical Pioneer has a checkered past with respect to the sixth boro:  she’s

part of Sea Witch and part newly grafted hull.

Thirteen mariners paid with the lives as a result

of the crash and inferno.  But ships are inanimate, just vessels shaped and reshaped by human hands.

We need her product, and so she’s

welcome in the port, I suppose.

And  Ellen and Responder are there to assist.

All fotos taken last Saturday by Will Van Dorp.

I call this a “water blog,” but usually avail myself only of salt water shots.  Below is what I saw from my bedroom window yesterday morning:  rainwater pool on roof beside my building.  Foto is obviously flipped, but the vent with round hole to the right serves as “portal” for at least three raccoons who cavort and sing after dark.  New York is wild.

Foreshortening . . . makes for some arresting shots:  here McAllister Responder, Franklin Reinauer, Jennifer Turecamo, and RTC 150 pushed by Meredith C. Reinauer enjoy much greater separation than appears.

Left to right here are:  Chemical Pioneer, Johann Jacob, and OOCL Busan.  I post this foto because it suggests that the forward portion of Chemical Pioneer and its stern seem mismatched.  Think about it . . . and I tell you the story below.

Foreshortening again . . .  plenty of searoom exists between NYK Constellation and OOCL Busan, but for some seconds, from my vantage point, I was getting nervous.

No comment on the frothiness in the center of this foto.  Notice the building on the tip of Manhattan between the red and green buoy.  That is 17 Battery Place, once the “footprint” for Moran Towing.  Starting on p. 273 of Tugboat:  The Moran Story by Eugene F. Moran and Louis Reid, there’s an incredible story about a Captain Daniel F. Anglim that dates back to the 1927.  In short, Dan had a naturally loud voice “even louder from having to yell against the wind” (pre-walkietalkie days) did dispatch from the 25th floor of that building down to the tugs waiting between Pier 2 and 4 on the Hudson.  I cannot imagine.  Looking for a good read:  Get The Moran Story!

Today several hundred feet of landfill separate 17 Battery Place from the nearest water.  See a foto of 17 Battery Place from that time here .  . second foto down.  I’d love to see a larger version.

Cape Melville bound for sea.  I love the name . . . that northeast corner of Australia.  In the background you see parts of the Brooklyn Bridge, Manhattan Bridge, and One Court Square, Queens’ and Long Island’s tallest building.  One court Square also appears in the second foto above.

That’s Adirondack coming around the side of City Pier A, the once and future dock for NYPD and FDNY?

Yes, this is a wild turkey in Battery Park, it looked totally indignant when I asked that he pose in front of  either the Terminal or one of the Homeland Security cars in the background .  Imagine that !!  But the location is inland about 100 feet with the Staten Island Ferry Terminal to the left and the Coast Guard station to the right.    Wild New York.

The Chemical Pioneer story:  in late May 1973, a Bath Iron Works container ship called Sea Witch bound for sea lost steering and collided with an anchored tanker called Esso Brussels, resulting in a deadly fire (15 deaths, 13 of them on Esso Brussels, loaded with Nigerian crude) and New York harbor oil spill.   Read the complete story here.    Later, the stern section of Sea Witch was grafted onto a new forward section.  For Sea Witch‘s original lines, click here;  she’s the second one down.

All fotos taken on May 20 by Will Van Dorp.

By the way . . . that turkey . . . she goes by the name Zelda;  be good to Zelda when you see her.

is the  name of Pamela Talese’s show (til end of October) at Atlantic Gallery at 135 W 29th Street Suite 601 in Manhattan.  Pamela and I share some large interests . . . like her take on Alice Oldendorff and

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and mine.

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Hers of Penobscot Bay, now

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gearing up for ice-breaking duty, and mine.

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Charleston, being painted in dry dock and

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fotograffed in KVK.

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Pamela has worked in cold weather and

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and warm to

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capture the ubiquitous

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changes wrought by rust and paint . . . in paint.  Below, she travels to her “studio” via the paintcycle.

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See her website here.  See her work at the Atlantic Gallery soon.

A description of people along the waterfront in the first chapter of Moby Dick omits a class; Melville mentions some  “posted like silent sentinels all around the town, stand thousands upon thousands of mortal men fixed in ocean reveries. Some leaning against the spiles; some seated upon the pier-heads; some looking over the bulwarks . . .”   To do the unthinkable of completing Melville, my annotation here:  “still others women as well as men devoted to the arts, brush in hand, gazing in turn at ship and then at canvas . .  or notebook, then searching with paints or inks or charcoal . . . ”  Go Pamela.  Go others!  I love it.    More waterfront art soon.

Ralph E. Bouchard and B. No. 230 move in the direction of Explorer of the Seas.  Not apparent from this foto . . . Explorer was at that moment reversing its way into the the Bayonne passenger terminal, backing into a parking spot if you will.

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Compliments of Bernie Ente of Working Harbor Committee, Hoegh Africa moves seaward through the KVK, overtaken by  . . .  she who’s been alleged as my “crush-du-jour,” Emma Miller.  Well, Alice has spurned me for just so long,  that part of me that always seeks “my other half” has decided that 700′ loa bulk carriers like Alice might just not be my long-lost other half.  Maybe Emma is more my type.

To get serious, Bernie has some fantastic “hidden harbor tours” planned, including four sunset tours and –what I get most excited about– a circumnavigation of Staten Island.  Click here to reserve your spot(s) while they last.

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Nathan E. Stewart emerges from behind New River, an American-built tanker from Avondale Industries, 1997.

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Emma again?   Nope.  It’s her sister Sunny Williams passing Histria Tiger, Romanian, proving that not all blues are created equal.  I’m partial to the lube tanker’s blue.  To digress into thoughts of love, I’ve never had a crush on someone with an identical twin.  I wonder how that would work.  Here, I feel something for Emma different from Sunny.  Hmm?   Such strange wiring I must have in me.

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Parting shot . . . stern of Chemical Pioneer, a very unusual ship to bear New York as its port of registry, escorted to sea by Rosemary McAllister, who arrived in the sixth boro almost a year ago.

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All shots, except Bernie’s, taken today by  . . . Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Henry’s logpage is up although the watercolors keep getting washed away by the stormy north Sea.

As we approach winter solstice in the north, noon light can be dull enough for me to wonder if my eyesight might be failing, my glasses opaque with greasy fingerprints.

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But yesterday my company was luminous (solar bright, even)  and the movement on KVK exciting (with stellar choreography), so we watched Sea Venture pivot with the assistance of McAllister Responder and Ellen McAllister and

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like a mere tub toy, this

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570′ loa vessel did a 180,

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fired up the M. A. N.  engine and

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headed for sea even if

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for now she headed only as far as Stapleton anchorage.

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Still,  this overcast December  light really makes me rub my eyes.

Related:  To take the fotos above, I stood in front of the entrance to Snug Harbor, Staten Island.  If you haven’t seen the exhibit “As Tugs Go By” yet, make a point to get there.  It’s fabulous.  Recently, as I re-read Fast and Able, it amazed me how many fish-schooner crew of vessels the vintage of Lettie G. Howard spent their last days on Staten Island at Snug Harbor.

Note:  Sea Venture is fleet sibling of an ITB featured here a year ago.

Never before have I seen Erie Service (completed retrofit only a few months back),

or Wye River (off the ways in Louisiana only a few months ago),

I have seen Bruce A. McAllister, but not the assisted barge Chemical Transporter or

its articulated tug, Freeport, half sister to the ITBs.

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My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

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