You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Urger’ category.

Boston Navy Yard, February 1932 and launch day.  Click here to see the context.

14291501
Grand River at Grand Haven, February 1907.

H J Dornbos
82 years later, the same vessel as the top one and now known as Seneca, pushes Tender #10 eastbound just east of Oneida Lake.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

107 years later than the second photo above, H. J. Dornbos, now known as Urger awaits dry-docking between Locks 2 and 3 in Waterford last week.  For a sense of how Urger looks high and defy, click here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Enjoy these additional shots from Seneca‘s wheelhouse.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s the story, and

0aaaaaasen4

here’s what the 1960ish waterways of New York State looked like.

0aaaaaasen3

Click here for an article on an international set of passengers Seneca has recently carried;  ditto here for an fall 2013 article an Seneca.

Thanks to William Lafferty for the 1907 Dornbos image.

No . . . it’s not a disease or a euphemism for profanity.  It’s many places, one of which is marked by this lighthouse in Oswego.  All these photos were taken since Tuesday in Oswego, a place I previously wrote about here last year after watching a drill that involved swimming from and to a helicopter.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

See the light to the right here along the horizon, a light younger than Urger.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Last year’s drills involving drones have already made their way into kids’ murals!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The mouth is the port of entry for Metalcraft Marine vessels making their way into various US ports.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Some vessels I was free to watch enter the port, but others

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

went by and I couldn’t follow until later, when they were really

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

behind and beyond

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

reach.  The tug here is Everlast.  If you were at the canal mouth this morning–or any other time–and caught a close-up, side view of Everlast pinned or–even better–light, kindly send along some photos.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp, whose access to wifi is still a challenge.

 

(I haven’t used this title since 2008) Ooops!  not true.  Here were 2 and 3.

Notwithstanding all that . ..    sometimes the thought that a day is the first day in the rest of one’s life is superlatively vivid.    Enjoy my pics and maybe you’ll get this sense also.

Sunday afternoon, Zhen Hua 10 enters the Kills. Does anyone know if “Zhen Hua” means anything?  Note Manhattan and the tip of Bayonne to the left, and tug Brooklyn, Robbins Reef Light, and the boro of Brooklyn to the right.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The new cranes arriving and the bridge their squeezing underneath are integrally related parts of the same story, as . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

… are the cranes and the dredging equipment in the background.  Note tug Specialist in the background

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Margaret Moran tends the port bow.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Gramma Lee T Moran supplies the brakes and rudder.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The ship completes its journey of thousands of miles.  Is it true that Zhen Hua 10 arrived here via Cape of Good Hope?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On the same theme . .  here’s a handsome team of tugs, good paint all around.  Working on a tandem assignment?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

My thought when I read the name on the nearer tug was . . . this is historic . . . Crow‘s last ride;  the Bushey tug might also be in the last mile of its thousands and thousands in a half century of work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

She’s being escorted in by Emily Ann . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Crow and her sister Cheyenne DO have classic lines!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Machines on shore were already staged . . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

while not far away a last spring seal lollygags on some warm rusty metal, once also a brand new machine.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And on the other side of Staten Island rubble of a light indispensable a century ago adapts to a new life as a rookery.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Many thanks to NYMedia Boat.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be transiting himself soon.  Thursday I leave on a grand gallivant, and in early June–if all goes well– I start a new chapter working on Urger, that handsome young centenarian tug you see upper left at the top of the page.

First the specifics . . . 70 Henry Street Brooklyn Heights Cinema tonight at 7 for reception with showing starting at 8.    After the show, stop by at Park Plaza Bar about .1 mile nearby.

So it’s appropriate to lead these NYC Municipal Archives photos off with tugboat Brooklyn.

0aaaaaa1902brooklyn

Next  in an icy North River  (?) . . . . . . Richmond.

0aaaa21902richmond

Launches  Bronx and

0aaaa31900slaunchbronx

Queens.

0aaaa41902dodtlaunch

Passenger steamer Little Silver, which ran between the Battery and Long Branch, NJ in the first decade of the 20th century.

0aaaa51900slilsilv

And finally . . . John Scully, a very classy Dialogue (Use the “find” feature to search) built built tug

0aaa11900sjohnscully

And the connection . . . here’s what boats of this vintage look like today in “disintegration experiments” in waters everywhere.  I took these in August 2011 while Gary and I filmed Graves of Arthur Kill.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Some boats of this time, of course, still operate like Pegasus (1907) and Urger (1901)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

while others try to stave off time so that they might once again like New York Central No. 13 (1887).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Late October 2011, Day Peckinpaugh and Frances Turecamo float above Lock 3, post-Irene, seen here through the eyes of the master of Tug44.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s Day Peckinpaugh last weekend, nose to nose with Urger, the latter here for shaft work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It’s unknown when if ever the DP will operate again.  Here and here are previous posts with the Eriemax bulk carrier.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Blount’s two decade old Grande Caribe applies the same design to contemporary passenger cruising.  Notice the popped-down house;  in this post from three years ago, the house is up. I’d love to hear from someone who’s sailed on one of these “small ship adventures.”  Shipboard romance?  What are the stopping off places for adventuring off the mother ship?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And compare the tug Frances Turecamo (1957) in the top foto to her incarnation now.  It’s great to see her back at work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Thanks to Jonathan Boulware , interim president of South Street Seaport  Museum, for passing along  this article and video of salvage of Astrid.

What’s this?  Where?  Answer follows.  It’s not really sepia per se, just an approximation.

0aaaasp7

I took this foto a week ago, then stripped out the color.  It’s Yemitzis, the former

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

PRR Philadelphia, launched 1954.  Major modifications have happened between the two incarnations.

0aaaasp2

Here’s another foto I took last week, Resolute.  With its ample pudding, it’s a perfect candidate to be sepia-fied.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The top foto was taken by Fred Wehner a few days ago;  that’s not Rosie the riveter but Capt. Wendy Marble, working to prep her vessel  Urger, for the 2013 season.  Here, here, and here are some full color fotos previously featuring Urger, who initially looked like this over a century ago.

Thanks to Paul Strubeck for the foto of PRR Philadelphia.

Of course, every day is water day in the sixth boro of the city of NY, and it’s great that MWA and other sponsors have chosen for five years now to recognize that fact . . . on a big “get out on the water” day . . . because who OWNS the port . . . ultimately WE do, you and I, as citizens of this country.  Many organizations manage it, enforce regulations in it, and fund educational activities about it . . . but WE own it, the port, the water . . .  and support it with our taxes and our votes.

Enjoy this set of twelve fotos taken over roughly a 12-hour period yesterday.   At daybreak, Pegasus and Urger were still rafted up on Pier 25.  This foto shows two boats whose combined longevity adds up to over 215 years!!

Resolute was northbound over by the Murchison-designed Hoboken terminal . . . which means a larger vessel needing assistance MAY shortly be headed for sea.  Here’s another Murchison-designed mass transit building in what today seems an unlikely location.

North River itself works tirelessly as part of the effort to keep sixth boro waters clean.

Urger poses in front the the Statue.  Lady Liberty was a mere 18-year-old when Urger (then C. J. Doornbos) first splashed into the waters of a Lake Michigan bay.

Launch 5 races downriver.

Indy 7 shuttles folk around as Soummam 937,  the first Algerian warship ever to visit the sixth boro leaves for sea.

Little Lady II and a sailboat negotiate passage.

Laura K and Margaret Moran escort in container vessel Arsos (check its recent itinerary at the bottom of that linked page) and weave their way to the Red Hook container port through a gauntlet of smaller vessels, including Manhattan.

Catherine C. Miller moves a small equipment barge back to base.

Fire Fighter II hurries north on the Buttermilk Channel to respond to an alarm.

A flotilla (or bobbering or paddling or badelynge) of kayaks crosses the Buttermilk.

Pioneer tacks toward the north tip of Governors Island, leaving Castle William to starboard.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp on Bastille-sur-l’eau Day.

Related:  I was overjoyed to read the NYTimes this morning and find this article about a vessel calling at Port Newark!!  Bravo.  Back a little over a week ago I was miffed about this article . . . about the port in Trondheim, which could just as well have been written about skilled workers anywhere in the sixth boro.

Also, I’m passing along a request from the Urger crew:  if anyone sees a foto of Urger crew in any local print publications, please tell me so that I can look for a clipping to pass along to them.  Thanks much . . . .

Unrelated:  From today’s NYTimes Book Review section, an essay by Douglas Brinkley and Johnny Depp on Woodie Guthrie, who would have turned 100 yesterday.

By the way, from Mitch’s Newtown Pentacle, can anyone identify the tug in this post?  I can’t .

Once these were wooden barges, which

were towed around the harbor with a wide range of cargoes.  In the foreground … disintegrating … is one a tug that once could have done the towing, now unidentifiable and impotent.

The sixth boro has many such tugs and barges, although given the efficient advance of decrepitude, fewer each season.

Once there was even a sixth boro barge called Periwinkle, no doubt painted in that color, a popular nightspot.

Here’s another barge called Driftwood, whose paint scheme and additional storage transformed a coffee (or whatever else commodity)  transporter into an off-off-Broadway-even-off-the-island entertainment palace.  Only stories remain and can be told by David Sharps, who

created the Waterfront Museum out of a wooden barge he literally dug and pumped out of the Hudson River mud, saving it from the fate of those barges above.    The two fotos above come courtesy of David Sharps.   Now the barge, the 1914 Lehigh Valley 79 tours with 1907 tug Pegasus, and other

vessels like the 1901 Urger, featured in many posts on this blog, help us visualize what those ruins in the top fotos once looked like and serve as places of entertainment even today.   Here’s one set of fotos of Urger high, dry, but cold.

Anyhow, with five minutes of your time, you can help  LV-79 and Pegasus collect a $250,000 grant for ongoing repairs.  Just click here–AND each day until May 21 on the icon upper left side of this blog to vote.  Partners in Preservation has chosen to award $$ by grant applicants demonstrated ability to use social media.  So please vote . . . and ask a handful of your friends to do so as well . . . .

Unless otherwise attributed, all fotos by Will Van Dorp.

(Silent version)

The Roundup begins with a parade between the Port of Albany and the wall below Lock 2 at Waterford.  Waterford is the easternmost point on the Erie Canal. From wherever they find themselves, crews and vessels begin to gather around mid-day Friday.  Benjamin Elliott headed south from Waterford,

Cornell saved fuel, waited at the wall, and met the parade just below the Federal Lock,

Crow joined in at its place of work,

Governor Cleveland, Grand Erie, and W. O. Decker traveled down from the Waterford wall,

some traveled in pairs like Chancellor and Decker,

Grand Erie and Decker,

and Gowanus Bay arrived from the south.

Some folks and boats worked en route in one way or

another.

Lots of folks and some vessels worked during the Roundup.  The fireworks barge would not have been  in place without the efforts of Mame Faye.

(Sound version)

Wind roar, spray, hiss, deep pitched throb, horns tuning up, whistles, pipes, percussion, more horns, and whoopnhollering of the crowd on Saturday night.

Fotos and video by Will Van Dorp.

More from the Roundup tomorrow.

Related:  World Canals Conference starts next Sunday in Rochester, NY.

Just back from the Roundup, but before I can relax, I want to download my fotos and put a few up.  Below is a lineup as seen from the 2nd Avenue Bridge to Peebles Island.

Another lineup, as seen from the fotog boat–Tug 44–loitering just north of the 112th Street bridge.  Many thanks to Fred and Kathy.

Left to right inside the Federal Lock, the Erie Canal’s largest and newest tugboat, Grand Erie (ex-USACE dredge tender Chartiers, 1951!!)  and Urger, (1901!) a frequent focus of this blog.  Type Urger into the search window.

Throngs crowded the waterfront in Waterford this weekend all day.

Just after dawn on Saturday fog rises from the calm waters.

W. O. Decker won the “people’s choice” vote.

Empire wins my prize for the most altered color from last year.

My thanks to the sponsors.  I appreciate your sponsorship.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More Roundup fotos and videos this coming week.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 358 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments? Email Tugster

My job . . . Summer 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Recent Comments

My Parrotlect Flickrstream

PC290099

PC290098

PC290097

P7070075

P7070073

P7070072

0aaaaff9

0aaaaff5

More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

free web page hit counter
July 2014
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 358 other followers