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When I noticed someone standing on a bridge in this rural area, I suspected it might be Bob, a person I’d never met but  . . . click here to see how many posts he’s already contributed to.

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Anyhow, I was not surprised when later I received the following photos…

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… all taken between Clyde and Lyons by Robert Stopper.

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Thank, Bob, and great to meet you.

Some areas along the NYS Canals evoke tropical forests . . .

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Some bridges are so low even today that we approach dead slow, jackstaff–our measure of minimum clearance–ready to signal full astern.

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Many places along the canal offer a parallel path for the railroad like

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this automobile train pulled by Union Pacific locomotives.

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If it seems I have paid more attention to these canal banks than others, it’s true, because these are in the county where I grew up and first caught a fish.  Click here for close-ups of this former Agway and beet refining complex.

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These abandoned scows lie within 250 feet of Rte. 31, but I’d never seen them until I took the canal.

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Click here to see the large number of posts I’ve done on this 1912 tug I call Grouper.

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When this creature stands at the end of a dock like this, I’m happy to comply.

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So far, west of Palmyra, I’ve seen the most fabulous bike trails.

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More trains and

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And finally, just east of Fairport, I love this garden with repurposed metal “sculpture” that includes two harps.

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All photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a view from the oldest of the fleet–Urger–heading through the Montezuma Wildlife Refuge.

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Grand Erie and Tender 4 (?) heading west almost three weeks ago.

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SPS 54 (?) tied up above lock 1 of the Cayuga-Seneca Canal.   By the way . . . SPS expands to “self-propelled scow.”

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Earlier this week, Urger meets Grand Erie near Clyde.

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Seneca in Lyons.   It was built by Electric Boat in 1932, and in 1960, was sold from the USN to Canal Corp.

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Another SPS,

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a derrick boat and a tender.

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Syracuse, a heavily loaded scow, and a derrick boat.

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And finally . . . can you tell by the foliage color?  Urger and buoy boat 109 with external fuel tanks in late August.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recently with one erroneous click, lost about 200 photos.  Ouch and we move on.

 

Click here and then scroll to the last three pics;  you’ll see a sixth boro version of the photo below, taken just east of Lyons.

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Near the Montezuma, these passed twice, and they were certainly not the mute type.

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Lots of herons hunt for fish from the locks, but they fly away as a boat appears.  This one, however, may have thought himself fleet

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footed enough to play ostrich.

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The parrot that share an apartment with me stretches each morning before flying; ospreys  . . . it appears . . . do the same, especially

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if they transport meals like this.

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Final shot for today . . . the four-point buck here just about to  find footing and camouflage on the north bank.

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All photos here taken by Will Van Dorp, who has access to wifi AND a more contemporary computer tonight.

 

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Some of you who write . . . yes, the fresh water canal might not be as exhilarating as posts about saltwater vessels and power assist tugs, but here is a good story:  hat’s off to Antonio Varracalli, a canal worker who died saving a life.  Then, Antonio’s name gets forgotten when–three decades later–someone writes a screenplay changing the names.  But Seneca Falls equals Bedford Falls, and this Ruth Dunham . .  I wonder what she did with the life Antonio helped her live . . . at great cost.

Tomorrow we move farther west.

0aaaaccb110aaaaccb80aaaaccb10OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaaccb70aaaaccb60aaaaccb5OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaaccb3OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaaccb1All photos here were taken between the east side of Oneida Lake and Seneca Falls.  In the row of buildings behind the boat in the photo above, there is wifi, as well as laundry machines and clean hot showers.  I counted about a dozen eagles–of all ages–along the waterway.

Portions of NYS Canals run in the rivers, like here . . . where not a trace of human control of nature can be found except

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here and there a navigational aid, and it would surprise no one if

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a sasquatch would appear on the bank.

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But railways and highways paralleling the canal are there, even though in places trees mask their presence.

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Interstate to the south, and railway AND two-lane to the north.

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Sometimes rail and

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often highways switch banks.

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All photos along the Erie Canal/Mohawk river by Will Van Dorp.

For some appropriate links, check this on the history of the “Western Canal” and the arrival of competing rail.  For more Mohawk Valley rail history, click here.

For  link to many more links about the construction of the NY Thruway through this same area, click here.

For info on the latest mode of transport through the corridor, recreational cycling, clck here.

0aaaaurg10aaaaurg20aaaaurg3If you’re up here, today’s another chance to walk through Urger and see Graves of Arthur Kill at 1230 on Pennsy 399 barge.

Here was the first post in this series.  The photo below I took last week after the newly painted engine room deck had dried.  At that point, I could have eaten off that “floor,” you know . . . a sandwich, a slice of pizza, although I would have used a plate so that the slice wouldn’t get the floor dirty.   At this point, we are forward of the engine, looking down the port side.

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Here’s a photo I took five years ago, same side of the engine.  Chris . . . the 6′ engineer shows scale . . .

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The next several photos show the starboard side of the engine.  The camera was nearly on the deck.  Upper left side of the photo shows the red grates of the engineer’s station and the chain attaching the controls to the engine.

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This is almost the same shot taken with camera about three feet from the deck.

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Here’s starboard side of the engine looking forward, and

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ditto . ..  taken at level with the catwalk the engineer walks on to manually lubricate the moving engine while under way.

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This is looking forward from “behind” the flywheel.

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The photo below shows the engine room controls to the engine.  Click on the photo to hear and see the Atlas Imperial running.  The sound here differs from the clip embedded in the following photo because here the generator is off.

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The shot below shows the upper engine controls, just forward of the seat where the engineer sits.  Click on the photo for a video of the engineer executing engine commands as the captain communicates them via bell and jingle.  In the video–yes, I invert the camera after a few seconds–the constant roar in the Kohler engine/generator/compressor.  The video starts with an air-start.  At the 10-second mark, the bell commands the engineer to stop the engine.  At the 18-second mark, the bell commands him to restart the engine in the opposite direction.  The captain was doing a three-point turn in a narrow portion of the canal during this time.

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Even though the post is called “internal” Urger, here’s a show from outside the wheelhouse.  Click on it to see and hear the Atlas Imperial running;  again, in this clip the generator is off.  The video was done fairly early in the morning and shooting into the sun.

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All photos and video by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to get better video of the AI once back on the boat.

 

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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