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Here what a quarter day (sunrise until very early afternoon) can look like in November . . . the same weekend the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree came to town.  To digress on this last point just a second, would it not be fantastic to have the 2011 (and all subsequent ones) Rockefeller Center Christmas tree arrive in the city by tug and barge?!??  Let’s make it happen.

So, Homie commuted from Gloucester again yesterday to make the sun rise.  Thanks Capt. Joey!

The early morning survey boat heads out as soon as Homie causes the sunrise.

Norwegian Gem shuttles in its passengers from the “chartless sea”  as a tiny Andrew Barberi shuttles its passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island.

Atlantic Salvor muscles its way around the Upper Bay.

Margaret Moran sees Ever Diamond to the door.

Timthy L. Reinauer cruises past Cape Taft, still bathed in rich morning light.

By late morning, the air is clear, as Freja Selandia emerges from remnants of wooden barges toward the Arthur Kill fuel terminals.

Inimitable Odin returns to Mariner’s Harbor, and

CG 40450 heads in the same direction.  40450 last appeared here.

Some say “ugly” and others say “unique”  but I’ll say Lil Rip should  cruise through the harbor more often, as here with a crane bound for Poughkeepsie.

Snow Goose stopped by the fuel dock to slake its huge thirst from the same source tugboats do.

And last but never least, Kristin Poling, dating from the same half decade as the  Empire State Building and Rockefeller Center, hurries along for just another day of work, its engine heat radiation turning the superstructure of Ajax into shimmer.

All fotos taken in one fabulous mid-November weekend by Will Van Dorp.

This post is devoted entirely to requests for info.  Like . . . what is the metal cage on this disintegrating wooden barge on the portion of Shooter’s Island shore right opposite Mariner’s Harbor?

Calaboose?  hoosegow?  tool crib?  bird cage?  rat pen?

Industrial to be sure, but what is

this structure right across the southeasternmost point of Port Elizabeth and near a green corner of Bayonne?

Lygra has an unusual design for these parts.  I caught her in Red Hook about two months back.  Anyone seen her before?  Know what she transported?

Someone asked me about this boat last winter, no doubt attracted by the design and the port of registry:  Portsmouth NH.  Until I watched it a bit this summer and noticed divers aboard, I was convinced that Dolphin III was a sport fishing vessel:  billfish or tuna.

But it seemed to be operating as a dive support boat, complete with

a fairly large tender.

So it didn’t surprise me to hear that the vessel might be working with a marine contractor.  Anyone know what project might be?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

See them under the arch of the Bayonne Bridge, two vessels:  in the distance a hint of bluish Mary Alice and closer up the petite bright orange Monark.

But if you were working in the fog of the KVK that day, you would want flare-bright orange in something so

tiny as Monark, focused on

surveying the bottom,  where the refinery roar obliterated sound and fog diminished visibility.

And Monark dashed all over the Kill, where the waters were sometimes flat and other

times quite lumpy.

Imagine my surprise when–two days later–driving northbound on the NJ Turnpike, I spotted through my moving windshield wipers, a sight of  the same mettlesome orange Monark, trailered, headed south.  Oh, why don’t I keep the camera beside me on the seat!  Well, given traffic, the right thing to do was keep my hands on the wheel and my eyes pointed north.

All fotos–such as I got– by Will Van Dorp.

I’ve not used this title since May.  But Mary K. Adella begs some well-deserved attention.

At this site, Ken Brockway,  owner and builder,  has thoroughly documented the creation of his vessel.  The only thing I didn’t find was the origin of the steamer’s name.  Thank for the site, Ken;  it could serve as an inspiration for someone looking to take on a project for several years.  Small craft maybe, but big accomplishment.

Hestia, written about here and in other posts, glanced over at a kindred spirit whenever Mary K. Adella passed, breathing heavily, as only steamers can.   The green work boat got some attention here.

Earlier in September, I caught this foto of William H working over near the Tappan Zee Bridge.    For more, click here and scroll about 3/4 through, enjoying all the other survey boats along the way.

Last one, I looked long and hard at the boat name on this white fiberglass stern–HOTel cORAL esSEX–and just didn’t get it.  It didn’t work for me;  I thought it was the name of a place or a song.

Win a few, lose a few …. oh well.  I suppose whoever writes this on a boat doesn’t get it either.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Thirteen months ago I last used this title;  it seems summer appropriate.  Look carefully at the foto below and the one that follows.

Same or different?  Barbara McAllister gives portside assist.

The huge orange Eagle Beaumont is in both fotos, but the 40′ Coast Guard boats . . . look at the numbers on the bow, one ending in 50 and the other 81.

Dolphin III had a group of divers over the side.  That’s Sea Raven in the background.

Seeing a cutter suction head emerge from the water might make me afraid to dive, but dredge vessel Florida

only raised it to have some dental

work performed by the crew on the barge attached to Brangus.  More Brangus soon, since there seems to be some new equipment mounted to the visor (hard to see)  that reminds me of sport at Pamplona.

Hoegh Pusan hangs on the hook as

Laura K heads out to meet an assist.

I can’t recall seeing the crew boat Alert before yesterday, or

Little Giant.

Parting shot of Heron.

I really am back.  More sixth boro fotos tomorrow.

All fotos taken Wednesday morning by Will Van Dorp.

FireFighter at the Narrows, Fort Wadsworth side . . . rainbow effect of spray . . . must be doins’  … big stuff going on or about to . . . .

Waiting on the Fort Hamilton (Brooklyn)  side, I espy a huge shape some five or six miles off, here between FDNY’s not-yet-in-service 343 and the venerable Driftmaster.  Iwo Jima (Mississippi-built) has returned!  See fotos I took on board last year here.

The first fleet vessel through the Narrows was PC-4, Monsoon, Louisiana-built, commissioned in 1994, here passing Ellen McAllister.  Scroll through this link to see a sampling of  fotos of Monsoon‘s adventures.

Next visitor in was WMEC 909, Campbell, the sixth cutter to bear that name, here with helicopter above and USACE vessels all around, from left, Moritz, (I believe that’s the stern of Dobrin … barely visible), Driftmaster, and Gelberman.  Campbell’s homeport is Portsmouth, NH.  See a previous appearance of Campbell on this blog here… last foto).

Next in, sibling of Monsoon . . . was Squall, commissioned in same year and state.

As Iwo Jima approached the Verrazano Bridge, a gun salute from Fort Hamilton drew

Iwo Jima‘s response.  By the way, the bit of land on the lower left side of the foto above is Hendrick’s Reef, on which the Brooklyn pillar of the Verrazano Bridge stands, an island that from 1812 until 1960 housed Fort Lafayette.  I wonder which Hendrick that was.

Ellen McAllister followed Iwo Jima in.  Is that Catherine Turecamo over on Iwo Jima‘s port side?

Next in was DDG 95, destroyer James E. Williams, named for a sailor who served in both Korea and Vietnam.  Read about her namesake here.

Then it was FFG 45, frigate De Wert, named for a sailor who died in Korea in 1951.

And then Bath, Maine-built CG 58, Philippine Sea.

Closer up . . . I can’t identify the Coast Guard 47-footer other than 47315.  By the way, see this type vessel’s capabilities as filmed in the mouth of the Merrimack River in all its fury.  The Merrimack was my obsession during part of the 80s and all of the 90s.

I didn’t see where Miriam Moran assisted (probably up at the Hudson River passenger terminal) but a while later I caught her headed to home base as Laura K. was out to Red Hook for an assist.  Check out the two crew on the afterdeck.

Hmm . . . I wonder what the story is.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, “Government Ships 5″ is the short title;  a longer version is “Their crews and all those sixth-boro based supporters.”

Welcome to New York.

A century ago, a parade of ships featured the Cruiser Olympia, now in very real danger of being reefed.

Staten Island Live has an excellent schedule of events planned the next few days on Staten Island, where most of the fleet vessels are berthed.  See the schedule here.

Final note:  I plan to cross the Merrimack aka “merry mack” tomorrow headed north for some canoeing.  See foto here.  The Pow Wow flows into the Merrimack.

Small working craft serve a host of  functions, as observed in the fotos below.  I witnessed an interesting gesture involving the New Jersey State Police below, which gave me great respect for the trooper at the helm.  You’ll have to scroll through to the bottom to learn what happened, though.

OK, so this is probably not a work boat today, but deep down inside its skin it’s still a 1929 Coast Guard self-righting lifeboat, and I’d see its function as raising the spirit of its owner . . . it would surely raise mine if I were galloping about on clear days in it.

But so many other functions are played by small craft in a harbor like the sixth boro that sees almost constant traffic of nearly 1000-footers.  Clean-ups,

miscellaneous services,

surveying aka reading the invisible contours of  the old river’ thoughts,   (In foreground is SSG-577 aka Growler, hardly deterring the approach of an unidentified but intrepid orange survey boat that has appeared on this blog previously.)

rescue and small-boat towing,

and more clean-ups,

and more surveying,

booming,

fishing,

assisting in dock construction as platforms and –very important–catcher of dropped tools.

That’s it for now.  So, the story of the State Trooper.    While I watched NYK Rigel getting backed out to sea on Thursday, I saw this small RIB boat racing northbound on the Arthur Kill, not an unusual sight.  Inexplicably (to me) the trooper throttled back.  I had seen a speck in the water just at that moment, but it was too small to make out.  After a quarter minite or so, the trooper throttled back up and disappeared into Newark Bay.  As the speck approached my position, I began to distinguish two Canada geese, swimming quite slowly toward me.  Then, there was something between the two.  There it was . . . two goose parents with two goslings, the tiniest Canadas I have ever seen.  I know that not everyone is thrilled by Canadas or any other goose or duck proliferation, but my hat goes off to the trooper for spotting them and making to effort to not swamp the young’uns.  There should be an sixth boro version of Make Way for the Ducklings,  in which all manner of shipping from small craft to tankers to tugboats can put the deadlines aside to  . . .  make way.

I’ll leave it to you to wonder whether I got too much sun yesterday.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  Scroll this joan sol’s post here and watch the video on trying to capsize a well-designed and constructed small craft.

A little more watercolor from yesterday . . . the rainbow injects magic into what otherwise might just be distant Brooklyn waterfront, Clipper City, and a Staten Island ferry.

Here’s what creates the conditions for a rainbow.

Color on water, this time reflecting a certain survey boat with unique paint loss patterns.

You will notice an apparent repetitiveness in the next set of fotos of Frying Pan over at Pier 66 Maritime–my favorite place on the Manhattan waterfront, except not

really.  The evanescent colored shapes so took me that I just keep shooting as

Harvey‘s propwash made ripples and

swirls and pulsations and

teases, glimpses of  LV-115 Frying Pan‘s chartreuse hairy nether parts.

All was fine until I imagined what other situations exist that colors the

waters this living red or

rusty, risky brown .

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Good golly . . . what hangs there?  Find a color clue  in the lower left corner as to ownership of the crane, …

Why . . . it’s Miss Holly aka these days as Paul Andrew. If you click the Paul Andrew link, check Sarah Ann. And if you own a crane like this, who needs a dry dock to lift a vessel into the high and dry?

Paul Andrew (ex-Miss Holly) built in 1968, 63′ x 23′ x 8 draft and 2400 hp.  Anyone

have fotos of

Miss Holly hanging around?

Sorry, but I couldn’t resist.  Nor could I resist listening to Little Richard Miss Holly . . . er something.

Top three fotos (taken in March 2008) taken by Mr Bill Benson of Hydrographic Surveys.  Thanks much, Bill.  The last two, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  A peak moment in 2009 for me was seeing Onrust lowered from a crane into the Mohawk for its very first float event.

Where I’m steering  here most corresponds to the second post in this series, Coexistence 2.  On an ideal day, all traffic gets along, sorts itself out.  Big steel and small steel keep clear of one another, again

and again, no matter what the direction or

cargo or time of hitch or

commercial alliance or lack thereof, or

speed for whatever the purpose . . . understandings get articulated, negotiated, and agreed upon.

But then without warning and from out of nowhere, the wild jumps

in.  The beast, driven by terror of the predator and the mindless urge to mate, dives in

as members of its species have for millenia.  Some have always made it, wild and unfettered.  But now the environment has

changed;  rules and conditions altered.   And intervention happens or

doesn’t.

Many thanks to Bill Bensen for the three fotos of the deer.  For the record, Bill took these fotos about three weeks ago although it may be the same buck that jumped in this week.  For more of Bill’s fotos of animals of the harbor, click here.

Other fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Info on the vessels in the fotos:  Foto 1: Bro Albert is a Maersk product tanker with an unidentified McAllister tug in the distance.  Foto 2:  Marie J. Turecamo and Kimberly Turecamo pirouette parcel tanker Stolt Vanguard out to sea.  Foto 3:  from near to far, Taft Beach, Captain D, and ATB Pati R. Moran moves the barge Charleston with assist from an unidentified Moran tug.  Foto 4:  near to far is Davis Sea and Java Sea.

Related:  I included the tug Dolphin above as an attempt to broaden the term, given  Bowsprite’s recent treat (treatise?) on inanimate harbor “animal” life.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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