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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaabw1OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaabw4The light was present for LCM-8010 and Sarah Desgagnes, but  . . . my white whale . . . Everlast . . . passed at 0300, which made for a not very interesting photo.

Ah . . . failure breeds persistence.

The newly named Patrice McAllister, sixth boro bound, experienced a fire near Kingston, Ontario.  For the story, see boatnerd here.   The Shipwatcher has the story here.  Bowditch, ex-Hot Dog and here the rescue tug, was featured on tugster here back in 2010;  see second foto from the end.

Several thousand miles south, Harding is an older tug still in use in the Panama Canal named for Chester Harding, not Warren G.

Foto taken almost 25 years ago from aboard sugar bulker Sugar Island, northbound in the Panama Canal.   Being a sugar-dedicated bulk carrier would make this one sweet vessel.

Top foto from USCG via boatnerd;  next two thanks to Allen Baker.

I’ve now also added Ship Watcher to my blogroll.

Also, check out photosbytomandpolly, who shoot from not far away along the western end of the St Lawrence Seaway.

All fotos today come from Isaac Pennock at various Canadian shorelines along the eastern Great Lakes.  And an interesting set of vessels this is.  Take James A. Hannah, foto shot in Hamilton.  Look at her lines.  You’ve seen a sibling of this vessel here before.    Recall Bloxom here and in the graveyard here. More on James A. Hannah and siblings at the end of this post.


This foto of M. R. Kane was taken in Toronto.  Kane appeared in the sixth boro on this blog three years ago in a foto Bowsprite took from her cliff.  Finally . . . a closeup.

Wilf Seymour foto was taken Port Colborne.  Seymour is Port Arthur, TX-built in 1961 and some of you may remember her as M. Moran!  Here are more specs from the McKeil Marine site.

Salvor is Long Island-built former Esther Moran. Salvor, delivered in 1963, was hull # 417.   To add some context here, K-Sea’s Maryland was also built  at the Jakobson yard in Long Island, hull # 406 and delivered a year before Salvor.

There’s not much to see here, but I believe–Isaac asserts– is the Australian-built, Canadian-flagged K-Sea tug William J. Moore, taken here in St. Catherines.  I’ve never heard of this vessel. I quote from Birk and Harold’s site:  “at one point she was dubbed the largest and highest-horepower tug in Australia.”  Who knew?

I located this image in the photo archives of Marietta Manufacturing.  Taken on May 20, 1944, it shows LT-650.  Bloxom was launched a month later, same location, as LT-653.   Two years later, LT-650 was sold to China, and current disposition . . . I’ve no clue how to trace.  Is there an US Army tugs-in-China expert out there?    James A. Hannah was launched a year later–July 1945 as LT-820.   Fleet siblings of James are David E. Hannah and Mary E. Hannah, respectively LT-815 (April 1945) and LT-821.  David E. appears to have been out of service since 2009, somewhere near Chicago.  Birk and Harold have her series of names listed here;  one of those former names was   Kristin Lee Hannah, shown here, although the date of build listed as 1953 is wrong.  Click here for a 2009 article on the demise/auctioning off of Hannah Marine.  I’d love to see a current foto of David E. or know her approximate whereabouts.

Many thanks to Isaac for these fotos.  Also thanks to the Point Pleasant (WV) River Museum pointing me in the direction of the Marietta Manufacturing photo archives.

Detroit . . .  it’s international and freshwater, although a number (anyone KNOW that number?) of saltwater vessels pass through for such still-distant “ocean ports” as Chicago and Duluth.

Vessels in the race below are, l to r . . . Sheila Kaye, Josephine, Elmer Dean, J. M. Westcott II, and Sindbad.  By the way, J. M. Westcott II could also go by the “floating zip code” of  48222.   I’d love to see a floating post office take part in NYC’s 2011 tugboat race . . . you mean the “sixth boro” does not have its own zipcode??  I wonder if the Terreform ONE folks anticipate a zipcode in their visions?   Then again, will the USPS even exist in 2050 or 2111?  Anyhow, more Westcott pics soon.

Again, Sheila Kaye, Josephine,  Elmer Dean, and Marvin O.

Sindbad was the overall winner in the race from the Ambassador Bridge

to the Dieppe Gardens. If the info in this article is correct, Sindbad was built in 1925 in Buffalo, but  I haven’t corroborated that.  It’s not on the Buffalo DryDock site.

Elmer Dean . . . pretty . . . can anyone confirm that it was built in 1998?

An international race implies vessels from more than one country.   You might not have suspected that Josephine began life as Wambrau, 1956, in Den Helder.  In 1987 she became Sea Driver II, out of the VOC city of  Enkhuizen, and at some point after that, became the Toledo, OH Josephine.

I’d wager Josephine is the only Toledo tug powered by Werkspoor.  Here’s an English language site on the company.

Wheel,

galley, and

after portion of the house.  The engine room must be light and airy with this many port holes in a hatch over the engine

All fotos come thanks to Jan van der Doe, frequent commenter who watched the race from the Ontario side.  Thanks, Jan.

And I’m supposing that some of these tugs may have passed through the sixth boro at some point in their careers.

To see last year’s post from August 30, click here.   For info on the race next Sunday, click here.  If you scroll through that previous link, way down in the fine print you’ll read that this year’s race is dedicated to the memory of Don Sutherland.  Below is a short video I made at a memorial to Don held in June 2010 aboard PortSide NewYork’s Mary Whalen.

This post is dedicated to those folks who . . . on Labor Day . . . can’t make the tug race or even the family BBQ because they will labor in the house,

on the bridge,

on deck,

following the border,

in the service,

pushing oil around, or

trying to clean it up.

Happy Labor Day.

Now . . . that bridge in the background has not been moved to the North Country, has it?    And have the folks at Brooklyn Bridge Park –the section south of the Bridge–finally been persuaded to have freighters incorporated into the design?  And is this foreground schooner really named John A. Noble?    Will the captain and crew please identify themselves?

Answers to the above questions are (in order) no, no, YES, and maybe.  The foto below is the same vessel, now named Sara B, and now a denizen of Lake Ontario.  Sara B‘s very complete and illustrated log (2004–current . . . hours of pleasure await at this link)  can be found here, a story that bears some resemblance to one told by Farley Mowatt.  In the background are Lake Ontario’s Chimney Bluffs.

Sara B was built in the 1950s (can be more specific now) near Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.  She then traveled up the  St Lawrence and through Champlain Lake and Canal, ultimately to the sixth boro, which explains the lead foto.  The log begins with her purchase here and voyage up to Ontario.

Below is the pinky schooner La Revenante (Ghost) (ex-Amanda, Buccaneer)built in Massachusetts in 1969.  I spotted her twice:  once near Ogdensberg and then here near Alexandria Bay. “La Revenant” belong to charles Baudelaire.

Mentioned in the Sara B log is this vessel (foto from 2008) called Royaliste, technically a gaff-rigged topsail ketch.

I saw Sara B in a barn last week south of Oswego, where she’s undergoing a refit.  Check out refit log here.

Anyone tell New York stories about Sara B or John A. Noble . . .   I’d love to hear them.

Last two fotos here are mine;  the others are attributed in her log.

Sara B‘s log is kept by Susan Peterson Gateley, whose other writing can be found here.

I’m still unpacking my head and camera from the gallivant to Algonquin Provincial Park, where these “water taxis” work the tourist trade, hauling canoes on racks to remote reaches of Lake Opeongo.  Because Canada is a bilingual country, next to “water taxi” on the sign were the words “bateaux taxis,” which Elizabeth-in spite of the fact that she knows French–decided said “battle taxis,”  an exciting

permutation.  And they raced around the lake as if they were doing battles, lances up top at the ready, jousting against phantoms.

At rest, the Giesler boats–built in Powassan between Algonquin and Lake Nipissing–are cedar–stunning-strip!  I want one!

Less beautiful, this aluminum  “battle taxi” jousts with three weapons.  The sound of these vessels racing up or down the lake was not unlike that of a floatplane, and it was easy to imagine this a floatplane traveling upside down, floats up.   We paddled our own ways around the south end of the lake, but given that the park is 10 times the area of  the six boros of New York, a little assistance helps.  If we’d taken a not-cheap lift on a “battle taxi,” we could have camped nearer to moose and bear.  Lake Opeongo is 1/3 the size of Seneca Lake and 1/6 the size of Moosehead Lake, this latter a probable future gallivant destination.

At the logging museum there I learned of “pointeaux,” very sturdy and shallow draft variation on the dory, designed by the Cockburns to

break up logjams, almost like a waterborne “log fid” that

resists crushing in log-choked rivers as its crews  “unjam.”

Thanks to Jed . . . identification of the freight vessel next to Maple Grove is a 1646 LCU, one type of vessel that HaRVeST should look into for transporting the Hudson Valley’s bounty to the five boros of consumption aka “foodway corridor.”   I wonder who came up with that garble, and further … how the francophone Canadians would transmogrify that.  Buy an LCU here.

Yes, I was transporting dry firewood from the lakeshore here, and it’s only coincidental that it appears that my canoe has a bowsprit, and I’m sticking by that story.  To digress, H. D. Thoreau said, “A lake is the landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature.  It is earth’s eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature.”  I’m sticking with that, too.

Less far up north–yes, this is Grouper, often written about here and still stuck just west of the Erie Canal locks in Newark, New York.  Anyone know what happened with the plans to get her to Detroit this summer?  This foto was taken in late July 2010.

Mystery boat #1 . . . seen at a marina in Cape Vincent, NY.

Mystery boat #2 . . . seen at a marina in Clayton.  This vessel has a metal hull.

The lines would say 40’s.  I don’t have any info about either of these boats.

All fotos taken by Will Van Dorp.

For starters, yes I do feel I’ve dropped the ball and missed taking and publishing fotos of such sixth boro events as the final move of the Willis Avenue Bridge and City of Water Day.  If anyone has fotos to share, I’d love to see them.

The North Country here means the St. Lawrence and beyond.  The white-helmeted gent does seem to be leading and gentle giant on a leash, not even having to

tug as BBC Rio Grande (ex-Beluga Gravitation, 2008) traverses the Iroquois Lock.  All the Wisconsin-built Staten Island ferries had to make their way through this lock.  Anyone have a foto of a big orange ferry passing here?  I previously wrote about these locks here and here.

It hardly seems possible their beam would squeeze through.

William Darrell ferries loads of improbable size across the international border between Cape Vincent and Wolfe Island, Ontario.  86 windmills now churn in the breezes near this northeast tip of Lake Ontario, not without controversy.

The “H” on the stack stands for Horne, the family that has operated this ferry since 1861.  This particular vessel entered service in 1953.

Bowditch (ex-Hot Dog, 1954) works out of Clayton, NY; as do

Maple Grove (left) and the unidentified “landing craft/freight ship” on the right.

More upcountry workboats tomorrow.  All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

For now, some announcements:

Kudos to the ArtemisOceanRowing (scroll way down) crew who left New York in mid-June;  they broke a 114-year-old  record when they arrived at Isles of Scilly this weekend.

And finally, I’ve started a new blog called My Babylonian Captivity.  Exactly 20 years ago today, Iraqi forces invaded Kuwait, the US entered the current era, and I became trapped and remained so for over four months.  It’s a different kind of blog–all text– but I plan to chunk it out day by day or week by week until December.  Please send the link along to folks who you think will enjoy it.  It’s all nonfiction, the experience as filtered by me.

April ends with transitions, endings and beginnings, decisive moments.  May 1 is cross-quarter day aka Beltane, and a time for juleps, mead, or mint tea–or rainchecks for same.

And into the midst of all that excitement into my email popped the foto below, thanks to Kaya, who had surfed the Queen‘s wake last fall.   Kaya:  you made my day by sending a foto of the gray and green ships below passing along :  I know that gray one (Georgia S)  AND that green one, but I know the green one more.  To digress, from this angle, doesn’t the Hudson look like a minor water course?

aamg

Marlene‘d steamed away from me before,  for other missions and destinations,

aamg3

after I’d witnessed her sidle up to handlers like a tame animal . . . not tame at all really but one with adequate self-assurance and strength to tolerate for a spell the appearance of being domesticated, the illusion of being led on a tether, giving herself if only for a short time in spite of her immense power relative to the handler.

aamg2

Marlene Green she calls herself, and she gets around and through some straits.

aamg22

And if anyone upriver sees Marlene headed back south, let me know ETA the sixth boro.  I’d like to get some good fotos of Marlene powering herself back out to sea.  Here be her sisters.

Of course there’s always the not-so-minor inconvenience of having to report for work the hours I–like most folks–have to.  And of course I’m grateful for my work, but all the passages, transitions, transits–just plain sixth boro traffic– I miss!!  Like BBC Konan a few weeks back.  Yes, the house is way up forward.  I’m endebted to Dan B for catching the shot below of  BBC Konan and sending it along.   See info on the entire BBC fleet here.    It turns out that Marlene gets chartered by BBC sometimes.

aamg5

Ah, well . . . I know that if I lived along here, I’d never get work done, never have the chance to be decisive because I’d always be scanning for surprises moving in and out of the sixth boro.

Thanks again Kaya and Dan B.  Fotos 2, 3, and 4 by Will Van Dorp.

Some may underestimate the climate diversity of New York, the state.  After shutting down for the winter, the Saint Lawrence Seaway along the north  just re-opened last week.  Check out this link from the Alexandria Bay newspaper.  The foto below from 2008  shows ice on Oswego harbor, which leads into Lake Ontario and downbound to the Saint Lawrence River.   As a kid, I enjoyed hearing stories told about folks driving across the Saint Lawrence between the US and Canada.  See allusion in this linkNine Mile Point steams in background.

aato1

Photos above and below, after ice-out,  come compliments of Susanne DeLong.

aato2Below is a “recycled” image from a year and a half ago.   I wrote about LT-5 here.

avd2

It was my Canadian cousins (literally) who regaled me with stories of driving their cars between the two countries.  Check out a newspaper story here.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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