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I thought all the vessels had left under cover of night.  Unceremoniously.  It turned out that the Japanese and Colombians had, but lots remained.  So the best place to go was near the exit . . . everyone would depart through the Narrows.  The forecast was 50 percent chance of rain all day, but I’d shoot from under an umbrella if necessary.    At 10, tugs were ready for USS Gonzalez to cast off.  Doubleclick enlarges fotos.

10:14 . . . she was under weigh.

10:23 . . . Responder returns for the next departee and Miller Girls (?) shuttles yokohamas back to Miller’s home base.

USS Mitscher at 10:33,

10:36, and

10:38, posing for Black Hawk photogs with a better perch than mine.

10:55 . . . Cuauhtemoc is next.

11:15 . . . USS Donald Cook moves away.

11:25 . . . San Jac next?

Nope. 11:34 . . . Argus heads for the Narrows

leaving Brooklyn’s “gold coast” (as on lots of these fotos) to port.

USS San Jac proceeds at 11:53 with escorts and fans aplenty.

11:56 . . . it’s “local-build” USCGC Seneca.

12:26 . . . Elcano departs under  11 sails . . . and screw  turned by ” motor diesel sobrealimentado de 2.000 caballos de potencia.”

Scotty Sky passes. . . WW2 vet and still at work, as is

Julia Miller.

12:50 . . . and I’d thought all vessels had exited, but here comes USS  . . .

Roosevelt, 

followed by LHD-1 USS Wasp with all her

like this Sea Stallion.

It’s 13:38:  Wasp has left the Narrows and Scotty Sky is topping off the tanks of Dewaruci.

Tankers wait in the anchorage, and

 . . .oh wait . . . for today, the end of the parade is provided by Guayas.

Some of these vessels will reconvenrge in Norfolk.  By 1400 yesterday, I know the French schooners, the Brazilians,

and the Indonesians were still in the sixth boro.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who is looking to score two XL OpSail shirts.    Barters . ..  anyone?

Wifi (why? fie!) issues have delayed this series, but let me begin this “better-late-than-never” post with some rhetorical questions.

If tugster sees a tug and doesn’t have his camera, did he REALLY see it?  I hereby claim to have looked up from snorkeling at Fort Zachary Taylor to spot Ocean Atlas and Ocean Wind . . . groaned about not having my camera . . . and then returned underwater to watch parrotfish, ballyhoo, grouper . . .

I visited the Mel Fisher Museum, but can you believe I missed the Miss Atocha Bikini contest . . .  @!@?  What would Captain de Lugo think about this?  And might Miss Patty Nolan participate one of these years?  Click here for some Patty Nolan history.

And I did hear about schooner Hindu . . . but will have to get fotos . . .  later.  For now, I present  Western Union and Jolly Rover.

Here Western Union headed out for a sunset sail . . . following the tender and two dolphins that JUST dove.

What these stats don’t say is that she was built FOR the cable company in 1939 and ran between Key West and Cuba.

I believe this is Yankee on the far side of Sunset Key, with crew in the rigging, like spiders.

This B & B named for Captain Cosgrove shows how contradictory some historical personages can be:  Coast Guard captain, sponger, and wrecker!!  I read this as “government servant, business person, and  . . . pirate.”

Fort Jefferson, a 35-meter National Parks Service vessel,  is part of a contract to deliver support to the Iraqi Navy . . . .   Am I reading something wrong here?

I haven’t found much more out than that Retriever is attached to Naval Air Station/Key West.

Another foto for the currently elusive  bowsprite:  a landing craft with a camper trailer on board . . . for how long?  And I’m not so sure I’d feel confidence in a boat named “Maybe.”

And a final shot for now . . . is this a production boat or a one-off?  Round . . . a water pod with at least one floor panel transparent . . . I failed to check if there was a propulsion unit anywhere.  Foto was taken at the east end of the Conch Republic . . . in Key Largo.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who has actually just returned, albeit haggard, to the sixth boro.

Fishnets get dragged by different forces around the world, but what’s remarkable is the similarity of modern commercial fishing boats. Scroll through this “December holiday” series taken by the master of yacht Nolwandle to see net boats from South Africa.

I’ll be really surprised to see a net boat called after the Norse sea goddess Rán, an original “fisher of me” and this Sunday’s siren. Above are some Jersey shore boats.

By the name, you’d guess this photo to have been taken in Asia, but . . . Jersey shore, again, although the boat’s registered in Pennsylvania. Check out this great post showing Galician boats from El Mar.

Here are two shots, above and below, of boats from Long Island and New Jersey.

What makes people who fish commercially part of a global brother- and sisterhood is the constant danger; it’s one of the most dangerous professions, whether nets or traps are used.

Anyone out there can send fotos or shout out blogs of fish boats in Asia, Europe, the Pacific, Australia? South America?

Finally, unrelated except through the danger factor, read cruelkev‘s April 5 report on–and foto of –a French sailing yacht taken by pirates off Somalia.

Thanks to Mar, here’s a pilot boat near Vigo in Galicia. I like it when the water’s so clear you can see the keel.  OK, a pilot boat’s not strictly a government boat.

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See FireFighter’s keel?

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Now you can, although this is not FireFighter. Anyone identify this FDNY vessel at Caddell’s recently?

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Ever wonder how the keel and prop of a Staten Island ferry look high and dry?

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It amazes me to see the gawkiness, fledgling-awkwardness of a newbuilding. Shipspotting’s foto misses this “learning-to-float-straight” spirit.  Buoyancy is tricky.

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The spirit here reminds me of springtime on the farm, seeing calves outside the first minutes.  Born during winter and confined to box stalls until there’s enough grass in the pasture, these calves require farmer’s help with people waving and bright flags hanging on the fence before they notice a fence and learn that it confines. Calves first in the pasture try to run–tails straight up–although they’ve no idea how.

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Hear the flags flutter in the breeze and smell the new toxic paint of this water calf. Feel the smooth hull coatings with nary a spot of rust.

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Scaffold still surrounds the bridge, and …

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and… and … she must be levitating, bulbous bow down, or in drydock?

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Fotos thanks to Mar, whose site–el mar–awaits on the blogroll. Mar’s from Vigo, due east of Sandy Hook about 3000 miles. I don’t know Paula C’s future route, but I’ll be waiting at the Narrows when she arrives, atlantica-experienced, having lost all gawkiness.

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My job . . . Summer AND Fall 2014

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

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My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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